National Kidney Month Continues

To continue the celebration of National Kidney Month, today we visit DaVita’s wonderfully informational site.  Again, I’ve tried to preserve the click throughs.  Just in case your computer didn’t receive today’s blog that way, their address is: www.DaVita.com.  Or, you can check out their discussion forum through the blogroll to the right of the blog. Notice: only the information pertinent to Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease is included in today’s blog.

March is National Kidney Month

March is National Kidney Month…. DaVita has teamed with The Kidney TRUST, an organization that aims to benefit the estimated 31 million adults living in the United States who have chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as the 550,000 Americans with end stage renal disease (ESRD) who need dialysis or a kidney transplant, to help raise awareness about kidney disease.

Chronic kidney disease develops when kidneys lose their ability to remove waste and maintain fluid and chemical balances in the body. The severity of chronic kidney disease depends on how well the kidneys filter wastes from the blood.  It can progress quickly or take many years to develop.

More than 31 million adults in the US – one in six – have chronic kidney disease and most of them are not even aware of it. Often there are no symptoms until kidney disease reaches the later stages, including kidney failure.

Risk factors for chronic kidney disease

High-risk populations include those with diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease and family history of kidney disease. Eleven percent of the U.S. population has diabetes, the number one cause of kidney disease. One out of three Americans has high blood pressure, the second leading cause of kidney disease.

More than 32 percent of kidney failure patients are African American. Other high-risk groups include HispanicsPacific Islanders, Native Americans and seniors 65 and older.

Who should be screened for chronic kidney disease?

Anyone 18 years old or older with diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular disease or a family history of kidney disease should be screened for kidney disease. If you live in an area that is offering a free screening, plan to attend. If not, visit your doctor and ask that you be screened for chronic kidney disease.

What is involved in a kidney screening?

Because there are often no symptoms of kidney disease, laboratory tests are critical. When you get a screening, a trained technician will draw blood that will be tested for creatinine, a waste product. If kidney function is abnormal, creatinine levels will increase in the blood, due to decreased excretion of creatinine in the urine. Your glomerular filtration rate (GFR) will then be calculated, which factors in age, gender, creatinine and ethnicity. The GFR indicates the person’s stage of chronic kidney disease which provides an evaluation of kidney function.

Treatment for chronic kidney disease

In many cases, kidney failure can be prevented or delayed through early detection and proper treatment of underlying diseases, such as diabetes and high blood pressure to slow additional damage to the kidneys. Also helpful are an eating plan with the right amounts of sodium, fluid and protein.  Additionally, one should exercise and avoiding dehydration. Treating diabetes and high blood pressure will slow additional damage to kidneys.

Related articles on DaVita.com

More features

It’s Friday.  The weather is beautiful out here and you know, if you have Chronic Kidney Disease, one way to deal with it (while complying with your nephrologist’s instructions after you’ve thoroughly questioned him or her about them) is to:

Keep living your life.

Advertisements

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://gailraegarwood.wordpress.com/2011/03/25/national-kidney-month-continues/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: