But That’s What I’ve Been Saying

Now that I’ve been able to stay home for more than a few days in a row and actually organize some of the papers on my desk this Labor Day weekend, I’ve come to realize the AMA is starting to think the same way I do.  That’s not as grandiose a statement as you might think.  If you heard The Wellness Authors Show’s interview about What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease , you heard me explain at one point that I look for patterns in my medical results.  I also believe there are patterns in the development of diseases. I mean simple, logical progressions in deteriorating health. Of course, it’s the doctor and researchers who establish the veracity of these patterns, but even a layman (like me) can see them.

I discovered this artcle at:    http://www.privatemdlabs.com/blood-testing-news/Kidney_Diseases/Metabolic-syndrome-shown-to-increase-risk-of-kidney-problems—$800580785.php .  It doesn’t say anything we couldn’t figure out ourselves, but I like that medical doctors are realizing the necessity explaining how metabolic syndrome ADNFCR-2248-ID-800580785-ADNFCRcan lead to risk of kidney disease. Although, I especially like that the article suggests that PATIENTS bring this possibility to the attention of their doctors.

 

Private MD News

Metabolic syndrome shown to increase risk of kidney problems

Updated: 2011-08-22 16:01:41 CST Category: Kidney Diseases

Metabolic syndrome shown to increase risk of kidney problems   Individuals who suffer from metabolic syndrome may benefit from talking to their doctor about kidney testing, as new research shows that the condition significantly increases the risk of renal complications.

Metabolic  syndrome is a collection of conditions that include unhealthy cholesterol, high blood pressure, insulin resistance and excess abdominal fat. It is known to increase a person’s chances of developing heart disease and diabetes, but the new study is among the first to connect it to kidney risk.

For the study, researchers from the Cleveland Clinic analyzed the findings of 11 previously published studies involving more than 30,000 participants. The results showed that individuals with metabolic syndrome were 55 percent more likely to develop kidney problems. Low kidney function, which is an early sign of kidney disease, a condition that often leads to organ failure, was the
most common problem.

The researchers said that primary care physicians should be aware of these findings and recommend kidney testing
to their patients when appropriate. Counseling individuals with the condition on their risk of developing renal diseases could enable them to make lifestyle changes before severe harm is done to the organ.

On another topic, as chronic kidney disease sufferers (I’ve got to find a better word), eating out can  be a pr0blem if we allow it to be.  Naturally, we ask a million questions before ordering.  Part of my traveling was a two night stay in Cottonwood, Az. to celebrate my fiance’s 65th birthday. At The Annabelle Inn, Annabelle herself asks you what you can and can’t have and how much of what you can have you’d like… and then she cooks it just that way.  If you still think our renal diet means unappetizing meals, you need to eat Annabelle’s healthy French style cooking. Look at the picture.  The jam is even made from fruit she grows herself. Everything on the plate is on the renal diet. If you go, say hi for me.

It’s all on the renal diet.

If you’re local, drop in at the Dog Eared Page Book Store (16428 N. 32 St, Phoenix) for the Local Author Book Signing. I’ll be there signing from 1 to 3. I’ll have copies of the book with me if you haven’t gotten yours yet – AND you’ll get to meet Bear.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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