Stressed? You Must Be Kidding.

You’re reading this and I’m recovering from my first cataract surgery.  Only one eye is operated on at a time, so the next one is September 4th.  Part of the post operation plan is not driving for a week, which I’m sure I’ll be chaffing at before that week is over.  Another part is reading (and computing) for only ten minutes at a time which is why I’m writing this particular blog a week ahead of time, even though it will be published August 21st.

If you’re following us on Facebook or Twitter, you know I had a cardiovascular scare during my pre-op testing.  While talking to the ever reassuring Dr. Waram at Southwest Desert Cardiology, he mentioned the stellar reviews for What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease on Amazon. That got me to thinking I hadn’t looked at them so months, so I did.  I found two new ones I want to share with you:

5.0 out of 5 stars very helpful for calming down and getting to work on controlJune 23, 2012

By R. Sass

Format:Paperback|Amazon Verified Purchase

This is not a medical book, but it is the ONLY book I could find discussing the issue of early stage CKD. My twenty month old son was diagnosed on thursday, almost in passing by his nephrologist. I did not ask any questions on CKD, I was not handed any pamplets – I went into schock and reacted like I always do to bad news I can not process. I asked questions about my infant son’s high blood pressure (the reason for the appointment). Tried to pay attention, remained calm so as not to upset my children who were with us in the room, and then began to research like crazy. I also went back to the doctor and confirmed that she had in fact diagnosed my son with CKD (stage 1). So for me this book has been very helpful, but again I am still in a schock like state and just want to know how to slow the progression of the disease so that my son can have a mostly normal childhood. Best I can tell there is no treatment for the early stages and at least my son’s nephrologist (who is an expert in the area) does not appear to be at all concerned or worried. So I appreciate this book because it remined me to take the reigns (no one else will or can) and I plan to speak to my son’s pharmacist today about his other daily perscriptions, just to make sure that its okay to take… I plan to get more knowledgeable about nutrition (just like the author did) but most of all I plan to let my son play the sports he loves because activity is so important (the author loves to dance, my son loves to try and ice skate like his big sister).

This book is a very quick read, its almost like you are having a conversation with a friend over coffee. It calmed me down, it gave me direction and it was available on my kindle in seconds. THANK YOU!!!!

5.0 out of 5 stars great down to earth read. May 31, 2012

By HELEN A. VIOLA

Format:Kindle Edition|Amazon Verified Purchase

This book and the author was very informative and so close to my situation that I felt at timess, I wrote it myself. There is so much information included, along with so many web sites to continue my own research. I want to thank this author for her down to earth style of writing!

Back to the cardiovascular scare.  There is no, zero, zilch history of heart disease in my family BUT (as we all know), I do have Chronic Kidney Disease. That moves me up a notch for developing heart problems. According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, ckd may be the cause of the following heart and blood vessel complications:

(Diagram  by  Nucleus Medical Art, Inc./Getty Images)

I was worried, but keeping my fear under control thanks to Bear and my good buddy, Joanne Melnick. – one with hugs and kisses, one with common sense (e.g.  Are you in the hospital?  No? Then it’s not an emergency.)

By the way, you can read more about ckd at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmedhealth/PMH0001503/

Here’s what happened.  I needed pre-op clearance for the cataract surgery. My trustworthy primary care doctor was unavailable, so her lovely and efficient physician assistant made an appointment for me with the nurse practitioner in the practice.  This woman asked her own physician assistant to perform an EKG on me – twice since she didn’t like the results of the first one.

I didn’t know the np., but was more than a bit disconcerted that she arrived late and had not looked at the notes, did not believe me when I pointed out on the ophthalmologist’s request that I needed an EKG and asked my pcp’s p.a. to verify, and – here’s the worst one – was visibly shaken at the EKG results.  Okay, maybe I was annoyed when I walked in (none of this was taken care of in a timely fashion despite my phone calls so it ended up being a terrific rush), but if anyone should be upset at the results, shouldn’t it be the patient?

The practice provided cardiology recommendations since it was clear seeing one was my next step. I called the closest one hoping they could get me in before my scheduled surgery. Southwest Desert Cardiology’s Brittany had me in the next day.  Their Dr. Kethes C. Waram answered every single one of my numerous questions (Hey, this is me.) and scheduled a stress test for the next day after reading the results of the EKG I’d been given in this office.  Dr. Duong wandered into the examining room while I was there and explained that EKGs can be interpreted from different aspects. While the np. used electrodes on many different parts of my body, the cardiologist concentrated on those areas nearer the heart. These EKG results were far less worrisome, but there still was an abnormality in one part of my heart function they wanted to explore.  Hence, the stress test. (The photo to the left is not my EKG and is for demonstration purposes only. Courtesy of Pharmacotherapy Publications via Medscape.com)

Dave made me very comfortable during that test. He even supplied a blanket since nuclear medicine rooms need to be kept very cold. I was injected with a slightly radioactive dye, but was assured this went nowhere near the kidneys and was so safe that I didn’t even have to check with the nephrologist about its use.

The test results came back normal. According to Dr. Waram, an EKG may be too sensitive to female hearts.  I’m having trouble verifying that via research, but I have to admit I had no symptoms and no results. I wonder why the np. didn’t explain that so I wouldn’t worry about the possible diagnoses (infarction, which mean heart attack, was one of them) on the EKG print out she gave me.

Moral: Go to doctors you know or have an immediate affinity with.  I didn’t know any of these doctors, but was immediately frustrated with the np, while I immediately felt comfortable with Dr. Waram.  Is this sound medical advice?  Hardly, but it makes me feel better should I have to see that doctor again.

Of course, if you have no affinity with someone who is the best doctor for you, ignore my advice.  I’ve done that myself.  The nice thing about advice is that you don’t have to take it.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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