Drink Up

This is a pre-canned blog written prior to the second cataract surgery. As mentioned last time I brought this up, I can only type (read, watch movies, etc.) for ten minutes at a time during the first two weeks of recovery.  I am not that great at short term thinking – although I get some stunning story ideas and problem solves while I’m simply listening to a book on my Kindle.

One of my problem solves has been to write the blog in Word where I can easily hyperlink sites for you. Then, when I copy the blog to wordpress, you’ve got hyperlinks. It beats your copying and pasting, especially if there are several links that interest you in the blog.  See, there is an upside to non-reading recovery periods (I can just hear Nima now: “Ma, that’s TOO Pollyanna!”)

Something kept nagging at me until I forced myself to remember what it was (who knew humans had the capacity to do that?). Something about what we drink. Since we (as chronic kidney disease patients) barely – or in my case, don’t – imbibe that means juice, water or soft drinks.  I’d rather get the fiber in my big three servings of fruit a day so that narrows the choice to water or soft drinks.  That’s what it was!

This is an older article, but one that resonates even with those who insist upon drinking soda. Well, except for my childhood buddy who insists she’s drunk diet sodas for a long time and they haven’t killed her yet. On the other hand, until her own death my mother was convinced she had contributed to my dad’s death due to pancreatic cancer by insisting he use NutraSweet, a brand name for aspartame.

Aspartame alert: Diet soda destroys kidney function

Thursday, December 17, 2009 by: E. Huff, staff writer

“Scientists from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston have revealed results from a study outlining some of the effects of artificial sweeteners on the body. Conducted on a group of 3,000 women, the results indicated that those who drank two or more artificially-sweetened beverages a day doubled their risk of more-rapid-than-normal kidney function decline.”

The article includes the fact that more sodium is used in diet sodas, and how stevia (natural sweetener) could be used instead. You can read more at: www.naturalnews.com/027758_aspartame_kidney_failure.html

The American Cancer Society seems to have only one concern about aspartame as of February of this year.  You can read about aspartame and Phenylketonuria (PKU) at: http://www.cancer.org/Cancer/CancerCauses/OtherCarcinogens/AtHome/aspartame

Wikipedia has this to say about aspartame: “Aspartame (APM; /ˈæspərtm/ or /əˈspɑrtm/) is an artificial, non-saccharide sweetener used as a sugar substitute in some foods and beverages. In the European Union, it is codified as E951. Aspartame is a methyl ester of the aspartic acid/phenylalanine dipeptide. It was first sold under the brand name NutraSweet; since 2009 it also has been sold under the brand name AminoSweet. It was first synthesized in 1965 and the patent expired in 1992.

The following is my favorite article by far.  I am a coffee lover to the point that I sometimes buy and blend my own beans – a pleasure introduced to me by my ex-husband and the father of my children. Yes, of course I have chronic kidney disease and, yes of course caffeine is frowned upon, but there is that 16 oz. (two whole cups!!!!) permitted for those who simply must have their coffee – me! Remember, I mention in the book that this helps keep me from feeling deprived since I follow the renal diet.

 “Kicking your morning off with a cup of joe may provide more than a caffeine boost. A recent study from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) found that older coffee drinkers — even those who swill decaf — have a lower risk of death than those who don’t drink coffee.

‘Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages, both in the United States and worldwide,’ the authors of the study write. ‘Since coffee contains caffeine, a stimulant, coffee drinking is not generally considered to be part of a healthy lifestyle. However, coffee is a rich source of antioxidants and other bioactive compounds.’ ”

Read more: http://healthland.time.com/2012/05/17/coffee-drink-more-live-longer/#ixzz25FfFcdVo

Another article from June of this year talks about water.  While you read this, keep in mind that CKD folks need 64 ounces of FLUID, not necessarily water, a day.

 8 glasses of water a day ‘an urban myth’

Water and a well-balanced diet ‘do far more than water alone,’ Australian researcher says

CBC News

“The common advice to drink eight glasses of water a day doesn’t hold water, say nutrition and kidney specialists who want to dispel the myth.”

The article includes fluid from other sources, including my beloved coffee.  The address is: http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/story/2012/06/08/water-eight-glasses-myth.html?cmp=rss

I have received three calls just this last month from people picked up the book flier AKDHC has placed in their office waiting rooms. The people who contact me have no computer nor know how to use one. They thought they couldn’t order the book unless they had one.  Wrong: contact me at 623-266-2609 (as they did) or order one by email at: myckdexperience@gmail.com.

Apparently, there was also an economic problem.  These days, we can certainly understand people not having the money for the book, but I can’t see that as a reason for them to have no access to the information in the book. 

I’ve sent an office copy of the book to each of their nephrologists.  This way they can read the parts of the book they need the most while they wait (and don’t we always have to wait?) for their appointments.

Does your nephrologist’s office need a copy of the book for his/her waiting room? Just send me the name and address of your doctor and I’ll be more than glad to send her/him a complimentary copy. The name of the game is making sure chronic kidney disease patients have access to information, not to get rich.

Until next week – when there will be another pre-canned blog,

Keep living your life!

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