Read, Read, Read

I’m a voracious reader.  I read everything: instructions, food labels, medicine bottles, research, fiction, non-fiction and my doctors’ notes.  In What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I wrote about keeping a file for yourself for each doctor you see. 

                                    

                                     I began requesting copies of my doctor visit reports as well as my blood and urine tests so I could have my own file

                                     at home and stay on top of whatever I needed to. With these copies, my home files would be much more thorough.

                                     I was feeling burned by my previous P.A.’s failure to pick up on the low readings for the estimated GFR and felt I

 

                                     had to be my own case manager. I still do and find both the nephrologist and my primary  care

                                     physician  agree with me.

                                  

                                   Not a single doctor that I’ve seen for a test or a consultation has ever refused or been difficult about

                                   making certain I receive these copies. Most  (The one exception was a rheumotogist I encountered after

                                  the book was published who not only charged for these copies, but had me doing the telephone run

                                  around just to request them.) have encouraged me to keep my own, thorough medical files at home.  I

                                  suspect it may have made life easier for these doctors, too, since there was no calling other doctors to fax

                                  reports or requesting them from labs.  I had them and could fax them over to whichever doctor needed to

                                 see them immediately.

 

 I have been adding quite a bit to these files recently due to the cataract surgery, sleep apnea apparatus, allergies, biopsies, cryosurgery, and an asthma scare.  I have been a bit of a medical mess lately.  

Ever notice that things happen in threes? I’m beginning to think they may happen in sixes. At any rate, I began to doubt my own advice until I read the following articles. 

Opening MDs’ Notes to Patients Wins Support

By David Pittman, Washington Correspondent

Published: October 13, 2012

WASHINGTON — Patients who viewed their doctors’ notes reported feeling more in control of their care and practiced better medication adherence, a study showed.

You can read the rest of this one at:

http://www.medpagetoday.com/PracticeManagement/PracticeManagement/35298?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DailyHeadlines&utm_source=WC&xid=NL_DHE_2012-10-15&eun=g596983d0r&userid=596983

I have to agree that I do feel more in control when I read the doctors’ notes. I’m also something of an overachiever, so I want to see my success at whatever was instructed – provided I understand it and agree with it – reflected in my doctors’ notes.

As for my doctors writing more clear and easily understood notes once they realized I would be reading them, well…. maybe it’s because they know I’m going to research that mine don’t do this.

Wait a minute; I used to spend quite a bit of time researching. It seems to me that I spend less and less time researching these days, but am not certain if that’s due to the growth of my knowledge base (Oh no!  I’m using my college instructor vocabulary in a CKD blog.  Talk about needing to write more plainly!) or if doctors really are writing in a way their patients can understand.

The other article that caught my eye was this one:

Medication beliefs strongly affect individuals’ management of chronic diseases, MU expert says

Health practitioners should use behavior-change tactics so patients take medications as prescribed

COLUMBIA, Mo. – Nearly half of patients taking medications for chronic conditions do not strictly follow their prescribed medication regimens. Failure to use medications as directed increases patients’ risk for side effects, hospitalizations, reduced quality of life and shortened lifespans. Now, a University of Missouri gerontological nursing expert says patients’ poor adherence to prescribed medication regimens is connected to their beliefs about the necessity of prescriptions and concerns about long-term effects and dependency.

The entire article is at: http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2012-10/uom-mbs101512.php

I readily accept that your beliefs dictate your behavior.  For example, my PCP was worried that I might be developing asthma and prescribed a steroid inhaler plus a daily allergy pill until I could see my immunologist.

She was being cautious, but the QVAR could cause oral thrush – a fungal condition – if I didn’t rinse my mouth and teeth carefully enough.  That was scary.  A medication that could cause another condition?

Hmmmm, it did allow me to breathe freely, though.  After a couple of weeks, I became even more uncomfortable since I believed I was developing a dependence on the QVAR. For once in my life, I didn’t research that.  I just stopped taking it.

When I did get to see my immunologist, I suggested stress might be causing the ferocious cough and the difficulty catching my breath afterward.  Not only did I have all these annoying medical problems I mentioned above, but my good buddy and my cousin died in the same week.  It was a rough patch in my life unlike any I’d experienced in the last twenty years.

My immunologist listened to me and suggested breathing exercises that might help since I wasn’t interested in any more pills or other medication.  At my request, she wrote the instructions for yoga breathing in her notes. And, of course, gave me a copy.

As for the article’s mention of mechanical reminders to take your medication, I still wouldn’t take medication if I didn’t agree with the purpose for taking it.  I do think I should have been more responsible and spoken to Dr. Zhao before I just stopped, but who says I was thinking clearly.

Bear uses the reminder on his phone whenever he needs to take a new medication (or cooks or times finish on his woodwork. He’s very clever that way.)  It works for him and he’s found some pretty interesting ring tones. If that method of reminder works for you, use it.  My meds are always meal based, so that triggers me to take the meds.

Here’s a laugh, sometimes I’m just not hungry but I know I have to have something in my stomach before I take my meds so I eat.  Can I blame all this excess weight on that?  Please?????

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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