The Flu Flew By

‘Tis the season to be jolly… and get the flu.  You’ll be in crowds at your holiday parties, even in stores when you get your shopping done. Everyone’s got to eat, even Scrooge, so you will be in the markets – and crowds – whether you want to be or not.

Uh-oh, so what do you do about the flu? According to Dec. 3, 2012’s MedPage, the flu has arrived early this year.  Bah! Humbug! Just in time for the holiday season.

“The flu season is officially under way about a month earlier than usual, the CDC announced on a call marking the beginning of National Influenza Vaccination Week. {For your information, that was Dec. 2-8 this year} ‘This is the earliest regular flu season we’ve had in nearly a decade, since the 2003-2004 flu season,’ CDC director Thomas Frieden, MD, MPH, said on a conference call with reporters.”Shoppers1

Who even knew there was a National Influenza Vaccination Week? You can read a bunch of statistics about this early flu season at: http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/URItheFlu/36225?utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DailyHeadlines&utm_source=WC&xid=NL_DHE_2012-12-04&eun=g596983d0r&userid=596983

Reminder: as a chronic kidney disease patient, you already have a compromised immune system.  Help yourself to avoid the flu by getting that vaccine.  In some cases (you’ll have to ask health care worker if you are part of this group), you may be able to take the nasal vaccine.  This is especially helpful if you have a great dislike for injections, but if you can’t because you have ckd, just look away during the shot.  That has been proven to make it easier to handle the fear, as I wrote about in an earlier blog.

By the way, Medicare covers the cost of the flu shot.

So, again I ask what do you do about the flu? According to Healthfinder.gov, you can protect yourself from the flu by doing the following:

Getting the flu vaccine is the most important step in protecting yourself from the flu. Here are some other things you can do to keep from getting and spreading the flu:

  • Stay away from people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water.
  • Try not to touch your nose, mouth, or eyes.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze

The entire article about the flu may be found at: http://healthfinder.gov/prevention/ViewTopicFull.aspx?topicID=18

Most of this sounds fairly obvious. But then Bear told me about someone at work who simply sneezes and coughs into the air around him. That got me to thinking.  Do you find yourself shying away from certain people who do the same?  Maybe you should.

Since the cataract surgery and the sealing off of my tear ducts, I am always touching my eyes to wipe away the extra moisture. Until I read this article, I’d always thought of myself as someone who doesn’t keep touching my face.  But that’s not true, is it?

And how many people in this economy really do take off from work for 24 hours after their fevers break?  Who can afford to do that? We have people struggling to hang on to minimum wage positions while a string of other people are ready and waiting for these same jobs.

It’s worth thinking about this yourself.  Remember when we were taught to cough or sneeze into the inside of our elbows?  Looks like that’s not as effective as stopping the particulate spray immediately at its source – your nostrils.  Makes sense to me.

We live in Arizona.  It’s so dry we try NOT to wash our hands since that dries out the skin.  I’m not saying we’re a dirty demographic, simply that we try to wash our hands only when necessary. That is not often, but it needs to be during flu season.

fluBut have hope!  According to Rob Stein on NPR’s Health News, “One big difference between this year and the 2003-2004 season is that so far the vaccine appears to be a very good match for the strains of flu that are circulating most widely. That’s important because one of the reasons officials are concerned is that one of the strains is similar to the 2003-2004 strain that caused so much illness and so many deaths.”

I think that’s good news.  It sounds like good news.  Is it good news? Why DID the 2003-2004 strain cause so much illness and so many deaths?  Somehow, that’s not as reassuring as I’d like it to be.

The original article is at: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health/2012/12/07/166745954/unusually-early-flu-season-intensifies?ft=1&f=103537970

I wondered how to tell the difference between a cold and the flu.  Since being diagnosed with ckd, I make it a point to take the flu vaccine annually, yet there have been times when I just didn’t feel that well. I found my answer in the following: http://abcnews.go.com/health/t/blogEntry?id=17885194

“ ‘With influenza you might also feel very poorly, with aches and pains in your muscles and joints,’ said Dr. William Schaffner, chair of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. ‘There’s often a cough, too, which is much more prolonged and pronounced.’ ”

That does answer my question.  No muscular aches or pains, so what I experienced was just a cold.

Don’t let yourself become run down with the festivities this year, take the time to relax, maybe even put your feet up and read What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. It’s available in digital – which is less expensive than the book – and print at Amazon.com and B&N.com.

You’ll be in good company.  I’ve gotten notice that personal trainers, doctors, medical assistants, phlebotomists, physicians’ assistants, chiropractors, naturopaths and gym owners have been reading it to understand how better to deal with their clients (or patients, as the case may be) who have CKD.  What a nice holiday present for me.

Here’s my wish that you had a Happy Chanukah and/or are happily preparing for Christmas and Kwanzaa.

Until next week,2012-12-12 19.41.37-1

Keep living your life!

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