Renal Foodie

It’s that time of year again. We have holidays of religious significance.  We get to see friends – old and new – that we haven’t seen for a while.  If we’re lucky parents, we get to see all the kids at one time. We even get to play with busy members of our families, such as when my step-daughter, Lara Garwood, asked me to go to our local Glendale Glitters event to see the lights.photo (2)

I’ve figured out how to stay within the renal diet guidelines at the parties we’re invited to and when we entertain here, but this time it’s different.  Our future son-in-law, Sean Rasbury, has taken over yet another family tradition: Christmas Eve dinner. The Arizona family alone has six members. Add assorted boyfriends and best friends and the number can go much higher.

I didn’t think it fair that he cook for everyone even if he is the one who has the day off, so I offered my help.  And he accepted, suggesting I cook a side dish.  Great!  Now I can get some veggies in!

When I went to the market for the ingredients I needed for this dish, I became aware of just how carefully I look at nutrition labels (the number of people politely waiting for me to move out of the way and then ahem-ing when I didn’t notice them may have had something to do with that) and wondered how many other people knew how to read them.

We are chronic kidney disease patients.  We do not have the luxury of tossing anything into our systems, yet we need to make the food we share with others tasty.  How to do that?

Leave it to the FDA to make this easier for us. When you go to: http://www.fda.gov/Food/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/NFLPM/ucm274593.htm you’ll find this chart.label

If you explore the page, you’ll find explanations for each designation on the chart.  It’s been color coded for your convenience, nice touch that.

Notice not all the electrolytes you need to watch are itemized, but at least you now know what you’re looking at when you see these labels. You can always use the downloadable booklet at http://www.aakp.org/brochures/nutrition-counter/nutrition-counter-english/ to see the electrolyte contents of each of the 300 foods listed in this booklet.  By the way, it’s been mentioned repeatedly that portion size is the key to the success of the kidney (renal) diet.

On the FDA site that has the chart, you’ll find explanations of serving sizes (Boy, do we ever need that!), links to specific recipes for low sodium diets, diabetic diets, pregnancy needs, heart friendly food, even a daily food tracker. In addition, there are downloadable shopping lists for healthy food. There’s also advice about how to pick out healthy food and including your children in planning the family meals.

Come to think of it, I seem to remember, my youngest daughter, Abby Wegerski’s teacher using this chart to re-enforce her math lessons in third grade. What a clever young woman she was. Or was she simply nutrition conscious?

Chicken-Dumpling-Stew-7DaVita has some holiday cooking tips of their own.

“Use kidney-friendly substitutions for your meals

Are you cooking a dish for a party and want to make sure it doesn’t pack on the pounds? If you cook, use healthy recipe substitutions for your kidney diet dishes. Listed are some ingredients a recipe may call for and the kidney-friendly substitute to use instead.”

Recipe calls for: Substitute with:
1 whole egg 2 egg whites or 1/4   cup egg substitute
Sour cream or cream   cheese Low fat sour cream   or low fat cream cheese
Sugar Splenda® or other   low calorie sweetener
Oil (for baking) Unsweetened   applesauce
Regular Jello® Sugar-free Jello® or   gelatin
Fruit packed in   syrup Fruit packed in   juice

You can find more of their holiday eating tips at: http://www.davita.com/education/article.cfm?educationMainFolder=diet-and-nutrition&category=special-occasions&articleTitle=five-holiday-eating-tips-for-people-with-kidney-disease&articleID=5371&cmp=dva1203_feat_art_five_holiday_tips

I do have to write something about the use of the sugar free products.  I wouldn’t use the substitutes, but would lower the amounts of sugar used in the recipe instead.  Sugar is 15 calories per tablespoon and is much healthier than any substance that has been altered in any way.

Until recently, I felt safe substituting unsweetened applesauce for sugar, but with the recent publicizing of genetically modified foods, I don’t trust the product anymore.  I would expect to see some central clearing house to list GMOs in the near future.

According to Wikipedia, “Genetically modified foods (GM foods, or biotech foods) are foods derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs), specifically, genetically modified crops. GMOs have had specific changes introduced into their DNA by genetic engineering techniques.”  You can read more about this at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetically_modified_food

As I researched GMOs for this blog, it seemed to me articles were either written and posted by health proponents urging they be avoided or businesses promoting them.  Cravat: this is not something I researched in depth and this is simply my opinion.

So, are you now afraid to eat or cook this holiday season?  Don’t be.  Part of the enjoyment in life is sharing good meals with our loved ones, maybe even with those we want to become our loved ones.   Enjoy yours.th

On a more private note, I’ll be taking both a copy of the renal diet and my own copy of the AAKP’s nutritional content booklet with me (And, of course, my book which has an entire chapter on the renal diet) when we go to Florida next month. I know what I can eat here at home, but we’ll be in a different place with different people cooking for us and going out to restaurants I probably never heard of.  I am so eager for my brother and sister-in-law – Paul and Judy Peck – and my cousin Nina Peck and her partner, Sandra, to finally meet Bear after all these years of hearing about him.  And, icing on the cake (of course I’d use a foodie phrase in this blog), we get to see my junior high school buddy Joanne Dana Young-Melnick and her husband Norman again!!!!

I know tomorrow is Christmas and the day after is Kwaanza, but you can download the electronic version of What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease immediately as a last minute gift for someone who has CKD, has a family member or friend who has it, is in the renal field, or is just plain curious.  It’s $9.95 at both Amazon.com and B&N.com. The Table

Until next week – and the last day of 2012,

Keep living your life!

Advertisements

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://gailraegarwood.wordpress.com/2012/12/24/renal-foodie/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Found your article interesting right up until you quotes Wikipedia as an actual source for information. Probably best to go to any references listed in the Wiki article which will be more factual. Do you know most colleges do not allow Wkipedia to be referenced as a source for facts in your research papers? It is really just a starting place for further research. I have no idea whether GMF is good or bad, but Wikipedia is certainly not going to provide you with the facts needed!

    • You are absolutely right, Janet. As a college instructor, I do not accept Wikipedia as a resource either. However, you’re also right that their links are more informative. I was hoping to lead readers to their links. As mentioned in the blog, all that was offered from Wikipedia was a definition of GMOs, not information to decisive information as to whether they are good or bad. Thanks for giving me the opportunity to clarify that… and Happy New Year!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s