Let The Sun Shine…

Here we are in lovely, warm, sunny Florida.  But you just left lovely, warm, sunny Arizona, you may say and you’d be right.  We’re here to see family and friends, one of whom is over 65 and has dropped over 60 pounds via exercise and diet.  Jo is my inspiration!

I’ve wanted Bear to meet my brothers for a bunch of years now. This is an opportunity for him to meet one of them, Paul Peck, and his gracious wife, Judy.  Come to think of it, I haven’t seen them since Abby’s college graduation.

Then there’s my New York cousin, Nina Peck and her partner, Sandra, who just happened (ha ha) to move five minutes away from my brother.  That’s another one I haven’t seen in a bunch of years.

Of course, I get to bring the book to Florida, too.  Some of the medical departments of the colleges there are following me on Twitter, but I don’t think any clinics or private sector doctors are.  Good, another way for me to spread the word. The Table

Oh, right, hot weather and CKD. The rules for CKD patients in potentially hot weather are the same anywhere in the world.

According to Dr. Leslie Spry, a National Kidney Foundation spokesperson, “Heat illness occurs when body temperature exceeds a person’s ability to dissipate that heat and is commonly diagnosed when the body temperature approaches 104 degrees Fahrenheit and when humidity is greater than 70 percent. Once the humidity is that high, sweating becomes less effective at dispersing body heat, and the core body temperature begins to rise.” The entire article is at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/leslie-spry-md-facp/heat-illness_b_1727995.html

We don’t worry about humidity in Arizona, but this is Florida.  No disrespect meant, but I clearly remembering telling my mother, Belle Peckolick, that Florida felt like taking a shower and not drying off.  She was living there at the time and just laughed.  She’d been a New Yorker, so the humidity was a higher dose of what she was used to.

Now’s the time to wear the hat you (meaning I) bought for just that purpose, but forgot was in the trunk of the car.  Otherwise, melanoma just might be a possible drawback of a day in the sun.  Melanoma.com tells us,

“Melanoma is the most serious type of skin cancer. It begins in skin cells called melanocytes. Though melanoma is predominantly found on the skin, it can even occur in the eye (uveal melanoma).

Melanocytes are the cells that make melanin, which gives skin its color. Melanin also protects the deeper layers of the skin from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays.

melanomaWhen people spend time in the sunlight, the melanocytes make more melanin and cause the skin to tan. This also happens when skin is exposed to other forms of ultraviolet light (such as in a tanning booth). If the skin receives too much ultraviolet light, the melanocytes may begin to grow abnormally and become cancerous.”

You are not only heating up your body by being out in hot weather, but exposing yourself to the sun’s ultraviolet light. Use that hat to shade some of your body.

DaVita reminds us to use sunscreen with at least 15 spf.  Don’t forget if you’re swimming – which this aqua-phobe won’t be although I’m looking forward to walking on the beach – you need to slather more on after each dip. You can read more of their hot weather tips, some for dialysis patients, at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/living-with-ckd/seven-summertime-precautions-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/4894

You know you need to drink water during hot weather, but is there a difference among waters?  Yes, there is.  As a CKD patient, your fluid intake is probably restricted (mine is 64 oz. which includes coffee, tea, juice, ice cream, sherbet, and Jell-O.  You get the picture: anything liquid or liquid in a frozen or jelled form.)

Mary Ellen Herndon, a renal nutritionist warns us, “Many drinks labeled as water are loaded with sugar and empty calories. Even though these drinks have ‘water’ in their name, drinking them regularly may cause weight gain and may increase your risk of obesity.”  For the rest of the article, go to http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2012/08/6-tips-choosing-water-drink.html?utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=twitterfeed

According to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/chronic-kidney-disease-home-treatment, we also need to be careful about exercising during the hot weather.  I don’t mean stop, simply make certain you are not becoming dehydrated.  Stay away from energy drinks!  As an older adult, I’ve become aware that I can dehydrate more easily when I exercise – especially since my kidneys are not working at top capacity.

Don’t be intimidated by the sun.  We can benefit from the sun if we’re cautious about it. Fifteen minutes or so a day of sunshine can elevate your vitamin D naturally.  Wearing a shirt to cover some of your body can help you protect yourself from the ultraviolet rays while you’re indulging in some free vitamin D production.

Be sure to protect your eyes, too.  This is a direct quote from the DaVita site mentioned above: “Sunglasses protect your eyes in the same way that sunscreen protects your skin from harmful sun damage. Your sunglasses should block at least 99% of UVB rays and 50% of UVA rays. Wraparound sunglasses and other styles that completely cover the eyes are best.” This information is good for anyone, chronic kidney disease sufferer or not.wraparound sunglasses

Excuse me while I see if I can interest any of my friends or family into visiting Epcot with  me.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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