By Request, Ladies and Gentlemen: The Flu (Redux)

We’re back thanks to the ever willing Sean who pitched right in and picked us up from the airport when we realized Abby, who had taken us to the airport, holds a blues dance just about the time we arrived back in Phoenix. Doctors and medical practices in Apollo Beach, Tampa, Mount Dora and Orlando are now proud owners of office copies of the book.

But while we were on the plane both ways, I heard coughing, sneezing, throat clearing and sniffling… lots of it.  Was this the flu?  All my relatives and friends had seemed healthy enough, but they weren’t traveling on these planes.interior of plane

That got me to thinking more about the flu just as it was requested that I re-run the flu blogs. Before doing so, I thought I’d find out more about this season’s flu.  Sure enough, MedPage Today ran just such an article on January 10th of this new year.  According to Todd Neale, who wrote the article, “Last week, the CDC reported that 41 states had widespread influenza activity, and 29 states and New York City had high influenza-like illness activity in the week ending Dec. 29. Although not unprecedented, that level of activity is not usually seen until later in the season.”

Some of the physicians quoted in the article wondered if it’s the reporting of the illness that’s improved thereby making the flu appear more widespread than it really is.  I don’t think I believe that since there seems to be a shortage of both vaccines and drugs to treat this ailment and Boston’s mayor has declared a public health emergency due to the 700 cases reported in his city. You need only click through to http://www.medpagetoday.com/InfectiousDisease/URItheFlu/36801 to read the article for yourself.

According to Healthfinder.gov, you can protect yourself from the flu by doing the following:

Getting the flu vaccine is the most important step in protecting yourself from the flu. Here are some other things you can do to keep from getting and spreading the flu:

  • Stay away from people who are sick.
  • If you are sick, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and warm water.
  • Try not to touch your nose, mouth, or eyes.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze

I wondered how to tell the difference between a cold and the flu.  Since being diagnosed with ckd, I make it a point to take the flu vaccine annually, yet there have been times when I just didn’t feel that well. I found my answer in the following: http://abcnews.go.com/health/t/blogEntry?id=17885194  “ ‘With influenza you might also feel very poorly, with aches and pains in your muscles and joints,’ said Dr. William Schaffner, chair of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. ‘There’s often a cough, too, which is much more prolonged and pronounced.’ ”

I’m including part of an article by The National Kidney Foundation so you can feel confidant that your kidneys are being covered here.

Flu Season and Your Kidneys

By Leslie Spry, MD FACP FASN

As flu season approaches, kidney patients need to know what they can do and what they should avoid if they become ill. The first and most important action to take is to get a flu shot. All patients with chronic kidney disease, including those with a kidney transplant should have a flu shot. Transplant patients may not have the nasal mist flu vaccine known as FluMist®. Transplant patients should have the regular injection for their flu vaccine. If you are a new transplant recipient, within the first 6 months, it is advisable to check with your transplant coordinator to make sure your transplant team allows flu shots in the first 6 months after transplant. ALL other kidney patients should receive a flu vaccination.

If the influenza virus is spreading in your community, there are medications that you can take to protect against influenza if you have not been vaccinated, however the dose of these medications may have to be modified for your level of kidney function. This is also true of antibiotics or any medication that you take for colds, bacterial infections or other viral infections. [Me: I have written about this in the book and the blog.  You have to tell the prescribing physician about your CKD and/or remind him of it if (s)he already knows each time a prescription is written for you.] The doses of those medications may have to be modified for your level of kidney function. Even if you are vaccinated, it is still possible to get influenza and pneumonia, but the disease is usually much milder.

You should get plenty of rest and avoid other individuals who are ill, in order to limit the spread of the disease. If you are ill, stay home and rest. You should drink plenty of fluids [me again: remember your limit on fluid intake] to stay well hydrated. You should eat a balanced diet. If you have gastrointestinal illness including nausea, vomiting or diarrhea, you should contact your physician. Immodium® is generally safe to take to control diarrhea. If you become constipated, medications that contain polyethylene glycol, such as Miralax® and Glycolax® are safe to take. You should avoid laxatives that contain magnesium and phosphates. Gastrointestinal illness can lead to dehydration or may keep you from taking your proper medication. If you are on a diuretic, it may not be a good idea to keep taking that diuretic if you are unable to keep liquids down or if you are experiencing diarrhea. You should monitor you temperature and blood pressure carefully and report concerns to your physician. Any medication you take should be reported to your physician. [Me: I’ve gotten other advice about those brands, so check with your nephrologist before you take anything.]

fit the flu

Medications to avoid include all non-steroidal medications including ibuprofen, Motrin®, Advil®, Aleve®, and naproxen. Acetaminophen (Tylenol® and others) and aspirin are generally safe to take with kidney disease. Acetaminophen doses should not exceed 4000 milligrams per day [Me: Nobody ever told me that! Why?] If you take any of the over-the-counter medications, you should always drink plenty of water and stay well hydrated. If you take anti-histamines or decongestants, you should avoid those that contain ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. Over-the-counter cold remedies that are safe to take for patients with high blood pressure are generally designated “HBP”. Any over-the-counter medication that you take for a cold or flu should be approved by your doctor.

You can find the article at: http://www.kidney.org/patients/FluSeasonAndYourKidneys.cfm.  Again, although this a nationally respected doctor, it is not your doctor.  Check everything you plan to take with your nephrologist BEFORE you take it. By the way, Medicare covers the cost of the flu shot.

Here is some of the information England’s Department of Health offered in 2011 :

Seasonal flu vaccination: Who should have it and why

What harm can seasonal flu do?

People sometimes think a bad cold is flu, but having flu can be much worse than a cold and you may need to stay in bed for a few days if you have flu. Some people are more susceptible to the effects of seasonal flu. For them it can increase the risk of developing more serious illnesses such as bronchitis and pneumonia, or can make existing conditions worse. In the worst cases, seasonal flu can result in a stay in hospital, or even death.

Am I at greater risk from the effects of seasonal flu?

Even if you feel healthy, you should definitely consider having the free [me: in England, that is] seasonal flu vaccination if you have:

  • a heart problem
  • a chest complaint or breathing difficulties, including bronchitis or emphysema
  • a kidney disease  [Me: I bolded and italicized this for obvious reasons.]
  • lowered immunity due to disease or treatment (such as steroid medication or cancer treatment)
  • a liver disease
  • had a stroke or a transient ischaemic attack (TIA)
  • diabetes
  • a neurological condition, for example multiple sclerosis (MS) or cerebral palsy
  • a problem with your spleen, for example sickle cell disease, or you have had your spleen removed.

Here’s the URL for this article: http://www.dh.gov.uk/health/2011/10/winter-flu/       Book Cover

This is an usually long blog.  That was necessary for you to understand that you can die from influenza… or you can take preventative measures. I don’t want to scare you and need to remind you that “can” doesn’t mean “will.”

Until next week when I’ll try to remember to tell you about Harry Potter’s World,

Keep living your life!

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Hi Cuz,

    Good post! I’m almost back to normal, healthwise!

    love,

    Dan

    ________________________________

    • I love it! My sweet cousin is feeling better!


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