Timidly Exploring Dialysis

We are a Landmark Education family; that is Nima, Abby, and I are all Landmark Education graduates.  Abby has taken many of their enlightening courses and was candidated as an Introduction Leader.

In other words, she demonstrated her willingness to bring Landmark Education to others and now knew enough about the program to be able to do so.  This is a big deal in the Landmark world and it was celebrated Friday night.

Of course Bear and I went to the celebration to support her.  We even got dressed up a little (this IS Arizona – people go to weddings wearing jeans.).  Since I recently retired – yes, again – from teaching, I went right to my teaching clothes to find something appropriate to wear tonight. landmarkqr

While I’ve only gained a few pounds (no, really), my body has finally decided to show my age.  Out went the tightly fitted dressy tee shirts that accentuated the belly.  Out went the fancy blouses with no room for the droopy bust. Out went the casual dress pants with their tight waistlines. Out went the maxi skirts that now reached the floor since I’ve shrunk.

And it struck me.  I looked something like the peritoneal dialysis patient Walter A. Hunt mentions in his book Kidney Disease: A Guide for Living: “ Peritoneal dialysis also causes weight gain and an increased waistline, which are mostly caused by fluid retention.  It may be difficult to find clothes that fit properly, because your abdomen may become quite large.”

I was reading the book on the recommendation of Mark Rosen from Facebook’s KIDNEY DISEASE AND DIET IDEAS AND HELP 1. Any book he recommends is worth a gander.  I had been looking for a newer book than mine that deals only with early stage chronic kidney disease. (There aren’t any as far as I could research.) What I didn’t realize is that Mr. Hunt wrote about dialysis and transplant in his book.

I began to wonder what else I don’t know about either of these medical procedures and ended up where I always do: MedlinePlus, a service of U.S. National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health  at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/dialysis.html.  This is what I found there:

“When your kidneys are healthy, they clean your blood. They also make hormones that keep your bones strong and your blood healthy. When your kidneys fail, you need treatment to replace the work your kidneys used to do. Unless you have a kidney transplant, you will need a treatment called dialysis.thCAQ0P7T3

There are two main types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Both types filter your blood to rid your body of harmful wastes, extra salt and water. Hemodialysis  does that with a machine. Peritoneal dialysis uses the lining of your abdomen, called the peritoneal membrane, to filter your blood. Each type has both risks and benefits. They also require that you follow a special diet. Your doctor can help you decide the best type of dialysis for you.”

This may be old news to those of you who are already dealing with renal dialysis and it was to me, too, but what about those people who are still in early stage or who love someone in early stage?  They don’t need to be bewildered when (if) this becomes necessary for them down the road, the way they were when they were first diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease.

As much as I deplore the thought of dialysis – I can’t stand anyone fiddling with me, not even for a manicure or a massage – this may become a necessity somewhere down the line for me –  or you.  We all know I intend to be one of the 80% of CKD patients who never progress beyond stage 3… but what if I’m not?  What if you’re not?

I don’t know much about either kind of dialysis, but am learning by forcing myself to research and finish reading Mr. Hunt’s book.  This is something I have studiously avoided in the last five years but I think it’s time to grow up.  I may never need this information, but it doesn’t hurt to have it.

I’ll tell you this, though.  Even though it’s Passover right now and Easter was Sunday, I made the commitment NOT to experiment with foods that are not on my renal diet.  And, since I know these are family heavy holidays, I took time off periodically to sit down and read a book for more than ten minutes at a time so I was at least rested.

While I was the one who invited nine people for Easter dinner (less than a week before our wedding, no less), Bear popped right in and took the stress off me.  He did the meal planning and the shopping.  I just asked each of our guests to make their specialties: Kelly made her creamy mashed potatoes, Lara her grandmother’s recipe cheesecake, Abby the crescent rolls, Sean’s mom Mary Ann the string bean casserole.  Alex brought wine and on and on. easter-dinner

It was pretty clear I needed something I could eat, so Bear brought me turkey, salad, bananas and strawberries.  I didn’t even miss tasting the ham, sweet potatoes, macaroni and cheese or some of the home made food.

I have a confession: I always get the adult children (the youngest is 28 for heaven’s sake!) Peeps and since the adults were disappointed they didn’t get any last year, I got them some this year, too. I know, I know, it’s all sugar and food coloring.

Sometimes, I get glutted by just being with my family.  Maybe that’s why while I might ‘taste’ the foods forbidden to me, I don’t seem to want to eat bunches of them.  Whoa, were the Beatles right when they sang, “All you need is love?”

A nice spring holiday present for me: the book continues to do well in the foreign market.  Let’s see what we can do about moving here at home too.

passoverI hope your Easter and Passover were (and still is in the case of Passover) happy, healthy, and rejuvenating.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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