Guilty Pleasures

I read this phrase somewhere and that’s what today blog is: my guilty pleasure.  It’s my pleasure because my mission is to keep informing about Chronic Kidney Disease and it’s my guilt because I indulge myself in using my own life experiences to ease into this information.

downloadI did promise to write about our wedding reception today.  The first thing that comes to mind is music, lots of it.  Abby Wegerski, Nima Rosensfit (my biological daughters) and Michelle Davis (Cheryl’s daughter and my daughters’ cousin) – all professional singers at one time or another – regaled us with “Going To The Chapel of Love.”  My Arizona buddy, Karla Lodge (another professional singer) blew us away with her own solo.

I don’t know how it happened, but I sang “Hava Nagila,” in a full, clear voice.  That’s odd because I gave up singing since I could no longer stay on key and my voice had become thin and reedy.  It certainly wasn’t that way at our wedding.

One of our guests was Robert Arthur who I met when he was a student in one of the writing classes I taught at Phoenix College almost a decade ago.  We played his original album during the reception when no one was singing.GmM8B2ylPUP0lIuKR9OqrzOqFEOtJtRaf2Rpt6ncsBk

People who didn’t know each other started to interact and I loved it.  At one point, I noticed our best man – Michael Payne – in a tuxedo having a discussion with an unshaven young man wearing worn jeans and an ill-fitting shirt.  The dichotomy tickled me.

Karla, my Staten Island buddy Janet Le, and Michelle, who I still think of as my niece (despite no blood relationship) handled all the kitchen duties so I could just “be the bride.”  Michael made a beautiful toast. So much happened, but it reminds me of child birth; I don’t remember very much of it!download (1)

So let’s get to the heart of today’s blog: pregnancy when you have Chronic Kidney Disease (like the way I slid into that?).  According to the physicians’ journal BMJ,

“Pregnant women with chronic renal [kidney] disease adapt poorly to a gestational [pregnancy] increase in renal blood flow. This may accelerate their decline in renal function and lead to a poor pregnancy outcome.”

That blatantly gives you the bad news first, but it’s not the end of any thought of pregnancy with CKD. You can read the fairly technical, yet highly informative article at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2213870

The following is a 1980 view of pregnancy’s effect on kidney disease.  Keep that date in mind since it is 33 years ago:

  • Increase in proteinuria [protein in the urine]
  • risk of preeclampsia [hypertension (a sharp rise in blood pressure), albuminuria (leakage of large amounts of the protein albumin into the urine) and edema (swelling) of the hands, feet, and face]
  • worsening of anemia [low red blood cell level]
  • lessening of renal function.

While I’ve paraphrased, it’s clear pregnancy with ckd was frowned upon all those years ago.  The study I found the information in can be located at this address: http://webdoc.nyumc.org/nyumc/files/med_nephrology/attachments/Pregnancy%20and%20CKD.pdf

Okay, lots of definition in the above outdated article.  Let’s see what thoughts about the subject are fairly current.

Pregnancy and Chronic Kidney Disease: A Challenge in All CKD Stages. That’s the title of an article I found at: http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/content/5/5/844.full.  The word ‘challenge’ caught my eye, so I did my best to understand the article which summarized information garnered between 2000 and 2009 about the subject.  According to the article, more cases of CKD were discovered during pregnancy than had been expected.  Of course, I immediately wondered if this were a new way of diagnosing CKD.  Of course, I knew I could not be tested this way.  Of course, you know I’m kidding.

baby-shots-5“Chronic kidney disease complicates an increasing number of pregnancies, and at least 4% of childbearing-aged women are afflicted by this condition. Although diabetic nephropathy [kidney disease from long term diabetes] is the most common type of chronic kidney disease found in pregnant women, a variety of other primary and systemic kidney diseases also commonly occur. In the setting of mild maternal primary chronic kidney disease (serum creatinine <1.3 mg/dL) without poorly controlled hypertension, most pregnancies result in live births and maternal kidney function is unaffected. In cases of more moderate and severe maternal primary chronic kidney disease, the incidence of fetal prematurity, low birth weight, and death increase substantially, and the risk of accelerated irreversible decline in maternal kidney function, proteinuria, and hypertensive complications rise dramatically. In addition to kidney function, maternal hypertension and proteinuria portend negative outcomes and are important factors to consider when risk stratifying for fetal and maternal complications. In the setting of diabetic nephropathy and lupus nephropathy [kidney inflammation caused by lupus], other systemic disease features such as disease activity, the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies [antibodies that might be in your blood and might increase the incidence of blood clotting and pregnancy termination], and glycemic control [eating low carbohydrate foods to help manage diabetes] play important roles in determining pregnancy outcomes. Concomitant with advances in obstetrical management and kidney disease treatments, it appears that the historically dismal maternal and fetal outcomes have greatly improved.”

The above is taken from Chronic Kidney Disease and Pregnancy: Maternal and Fetal Outcomes by Michael J. Fischer at: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1548559507000055, which is dated April 2007.  I included the entire paragraph since it makes so clear that pregnancy outcomes “have greatly improved.” And that was six years ago! By the way, I added the definitions in brackets.

I seem to be having trouble finding anything more recent, so I’ll summarize what I have found:

  1. Speak with your nephrologist about a high risk team before you become pregnant, if possible.
  2. Pregnancy in early stages of CKD has better outcomes.
  3. CKD may be discovered during pregnancy.
  4. Pregnancy is not an impossibility if you have CKD.kidneys5
  5. Treatment in pregnancy in CKD is continually improving.
  6. The risks are caused by increased renal blood flow along with other factors.

Considering my age, I’ll take my mother’s advice: “Better you than me.”  Don’t let CKD cause you to miss out on one of the wonders of life, but don’t be foolish.  Take care of that baby you intend to bring into the world by taking care of its mother.  Reminder:  giving birth to a baby is not the only way to become a mother.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Looks like the wedding was wonderful and all that you would dream of. Lots of family, extended family, many friends, definitely a lot of singing. Hope that you also have a wonderful Honeymoon also, and certainly continued good health.

    CHEERZ TU JO

    Date: Mon, 22 Apr 2013 19:53:16 +0000 To: cheerztu@hotmail.com

    • Thank you, Joanne! I just got my blood test results and am thrilled to tell you all I am holding my own despite all the wedding ‘slip-ups.’


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