The Less Than Sexy Sinuses

photoHappy birthday TODAY to my first born, Ms. Nima Beckie, whose name means (in Tibetan)  the sun up in the sky.  You were, and always will be, my miracle. I was never quite sure I would be pregnant and give birth in this life until there was you.  Thank you, my love.QPJ8IQXD2omxIGstmJVegwlJJ4zLcZLsR0skZQQxogg

This weekend was also the celebration of our first month of married life and I spent it in bed, but not the way you might think.  I have a whopping sinus infection: bacterial, non-contagious infection.  First of all, no one (and I mean no one) will believe me that it is non-contagious.

I wasn’t even sure that I believed it, so I researched it – of course. Viral commonly means an airborne virus which doesn’t respond to drugs since it needs a host to live in , and so, is already  inside our cells by the time we become ill. One way we spread this type of infection is by sneezing and coughing in public.

Bacteria, on the other hand, do respond to drugs like the 500 mg. of ciprofloxacin I’m taking twice a day for ten days. (I ran this prescription from my primary care doctor by both the pharmacist and the nephrologist to make certain the drug wouldn’t harm my kidneys… and I trust my primary care doctor!)  Bacteria need no host and are cells in their own right.

Now, can I please leave the house?  Or will you at least visit me?  Actually, once I could crawl out of bed, I found myself busily updating and vetting another book I’m working on with pretty good results.  I also found things in the house I didn’t even know were missing.  Not bad for someone who hates to be down and out for the count. I’m not so good at being a patient.

Sinuses are the area of the body that give Bear and his family trouble, not me or mine.  I like trying new things, but this is not exactly what I had in mind.  The obvious question is, “How did I suddenly develop an infection in this part of the body of all places?”.

According to MedlinePlus at http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/sinusitis.html,

“Sinusitis can be acute, lasting for less than four weeks, or chronic, lasting much longer. Acute sinusitis often starts as a cold, which then turns into a bacterial infection. Allergies, pollutants, nasal problems and certain diseases can also cause sinusitis.”

Well, I have allergies.  And sinusitis just means an inflammation of the sinuses – which is what an infection is.

But what, if anything, does this have to do with Chronic Kidney Disease?  You’ve got to remember that your immune system is already compromised.  Your kidneys aren’t working at 100% (see your GFR).  Your medications have to be monitored and sometimes modified.  If your body is not releasing the meds at full capacity via the kidneys that aren’t working at full capacity, you may need to take less of them, lower the strength, or lengthen the time between doses.

sinusesBack to the sinuses.  I knew where they were because I could feel them when I first realized I was ill.  I’m still not that quick to realize when I’m ill and was at my primary care doctor’s office for the required annual Medicare Wellness visit (How’s that for irony?) when she quickly changed it to a non-Wellness visit and asked me to schedule another Wellness visit.

The Mayo Clinic has this to say about acute sinusitis:

“Acute sinusitis (acute rhinosinusitis) causes the cavities around your nasal passages (sinuses) to become inflamed and swollen. This interferes with drainage and causes mucus to build up.

With acute sinusitis, it may be difficult to breathe through your nose. The area around your eyes and face may feel swollen, and you may have throbbing facial pain or a headache.”

You can read more at: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/acute-sinusitis/DS00170.

Before we get any more detailed here, a few reminders (taken from What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s Glossary):

Acute  – extremely painful, severe or serious, quick onset, of short duration; the opposite of chronic.

Antibiotic  – medication used to treat infection.

Chronic  –  Long term, the opposite of acute.

Chronic Kidney Disease – damage to the kidneys for more than three months, which cannot be reversed but may be slowed.

GFR – Glomerular filtration rate which determines both the stage of kidney disease and how well the kidneys are functioning.

Medicare – U.S. government health insurance for those over 65, those having certain special needs, or those who have end stage renal disease.

Nephrologist – renal or kidney and hypertension specialist.

Hmmm, I hadn’t realized how often I use technical terms which have become part of my personal vocabulary.  I’ll make a determined effort to be aware of that in the future.

I intend to have the acute kind of sinus infection.  I can’t see making this a lifelong practice, so I’ll try to avoid it.  I’m not quite sure how just yet.  Here are some suggestions I found at: http://www.essortment.com/prevent-sinus-infection-62926.html, which calls itself “your source for knowledge.”  I am not familiar with the site, although I did like that they differentiate between viral and bacterial sinusitis.

“Be sure to blow your nose frequently to prevent a mucous buildup. Apply a warm, but not hot, washcloth or compress to your face for five or ten minutes at a time, perhaps twice a day, to help loosen stuffy passages. Very warm showers or baths likewise can help to release tight muscles and open the sinuses to let them flow. Enjoy hot tea on a regular basis. Filled with flavenoids and antioxidants that can track down and kill bacteria, tea’s steam can open up and loosen your sinus passages to prevent problems from developing.”

sinus infectionThis is the simplest and most direct picture of infected sinuses I could find.  I felt as if I had swollen glands, could barely talk, could not stop blowing my nose, and (the worst part for a CKD patient who avoids NSAIDS) had a headache that stopped me cold.

Not quite half way into the antibiotic regime, I’m ready to go conquer the world again… or at least work on getting CKD information on the reservations, but something tells me to hold off another day or so.  Oh, right, it’s Bear.  He keeps saying it’s a better idea to deal with this now than keep having to deal with it in the future.  I married such a smartie!

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. I believe everything wrote made a lot of sense.
    However, what about this? suppose you were to create a killer
    headline? I mean, I don’t wish to tell you how to run your blog, however suppose you added a post title that makes people desire more? I mean The Less Than Sexy Sinuses | What Is It and How Did I Get It? is kinda boring. You might look at Yahoo’s home
    page and watch how they write post headlines to get people to open the links.
    You might add a related video or a related pic or two to get people interested about what you’ve written. Just my opinion, it might make your blog a little livelier.

    • You have a point there, Dr. Simendic, although I’m not sure how you missed the related pictures that appear in the blog. I have looked at Yahoo’s homepage, but found the headlines a bit too sensational for me. Maybe it’s time to take another look at them. Funny you should mention videos because that’s what I’m learning to do now.

      Thanks for the suggestions and for reading the blog. Please let me know if there are any communities you know of that are in need of CKD educators. SlowItDown is a project I developed that brings educators to such communities for free and on a sustainable basis.

  2. Perhaps it is perr day of extendded playing for your kid, or possibly a day complete of physical perform or even entertaining activities of sun and
    enjoyable, but no matter the reasoning, the occasional snoring session not only
    is tolerable by the rest from the loved ones, but even somewhat organic because oof the
    incredibly deep sleeping patterns that ocfcur with occasional more han exertions.

    • That’s true, but you’ve got to keep in mind we’re not discussing the occasional snoring session. This is a decision of life threatening sleep apnea. I hadn’t realized quite how dangerous that is myself until I was diagnosed and began to be treated for sleep apnea. Thanks for commenting. I enjoy readers’ input!


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