Keep That Liver Lively

It feels so good to be (relatively) healthy again. I’ve spent the last several weeks being tested, running to doctors, and feeling like I just plain didn’t want to move… not even for a good cup of coffee.  I like the way I feel now.  Maybe I rest more than I’ve been used to, but I get to do whatever I want again.  That’s the way to live.  I like it so much that I intent to keep my life this way.YGCnpYEUFRtlrF00_f9frLXF_JWiNWNHS9AVZmM1PxI

And that’s why I’m taking the series of Hepatitis B inoculations that are recommended for anyone with a compromised immune system. Chronic Kidney Disease presents us with one of those. Aren’t we just the lucky ones (she wrote with a keyboard that dripped sarcasm)?

“Hepatitis B is one type of hepatitis – a liver disease – caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person’s blood, semen or other body fluid. An infected woman can give hepatitis B to her baby at birth,” according to MedlinePlus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health located online at: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/hepatitisb.html.

liverLet’s backtrack for a little etymology here.  The Online Etymology Dictionary at http://etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=hepatitis&searchmode=nl  shows the following: “hepatitis (n.)  1727, coined from Greek hepatos, genitive of hepar “liver,” from PIE root *yekwr- (cf. Sanskrit yakrt, Avestan yakar, Persian jigar, Latin jecur, Old Lithuanian jeknos “liver”) + -itis “inflammation.” While this is probably too much information, we can see that the term comes from the Greek for liver and the Latin for inflammation, and was first commonly used in 1727. The key word here? Liver.

Okay then, what’s the big deal with the liver you’re probably asking. While it performs over 500 different functions to keep your body going, one of its primary functions is to filter your blood – just like your kidneys.  If your kidney function is already compromised, you’ve got to be careful not to let your liver function become compromised, too.

We’ve all heard the stories about people with an alcohol dependency dying of cirrhosis – permanent scarring of the liver.  This is a Bubba Miseh. That’s Yiddish for an old wives’ tale.  You can have liver damage from any number of causes. Hepatitis B is one of them.

“Hepatitis B is a serious liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). For some people, hepatitis B infection becomes chronic, leading to liver failure, liver cancer or cirrhosis — a condition that causes permanent scarring of the liver.”  That’s from the Mayo Clinic at: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/hepatitis-b/DS00398.  I especially recommend their site because it is written in the English we all know and is easily understood.

According to the handout from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Center for Disease Control and Prevention which I was given by my doctor’s medical assistant, the inoculations come in sets of three.  I’ve had the first and was told to come back in a month for the second, with the third scheduled for a month after the second.  In other words, they are spaced over a period of six months.shot

But what if my primary care doctor hadn’t recommended these to me, how would I know if I have Hepatitis B?  According to MedicineNet.com at http://www.medicinenet.com/hepatitis_b/article, “Acute hepatitis B is the period of illness that occurs during the first one to four months after acquiring the virus. Only 30% to 50% of adults develop significant symptoms during acute infection. Early symptoms may be non-specific, including fever, a flu-like illness, and joint pains. Symptoms of acute hepatitis may include:

Those are fairly common symptoms for many illnesses and as many as half the people with this virus may not know they have it.  I might have been one of that 50%.  So might you.

For chronic (long term) Hepatitis B, like Chronic Kidney Disease, there are no symptoms until the damage is done and the liver starts to fail.

Am I urging you to be vaccinated?  No, you’re quite capable of making up your own mind.  Besides, as I keep mentioning, I’m not a doctor.  Did I start the Hepatitis-B inoculations?  Absolutely!  Life is sweeter than it’s ever been.  I want it to go on and on.virus

Talking about life going on, the project to bring Chronic Kidney Disease to the Native American reservations has a name: SlowItDown.  You can expect to see both a Facebook page and a Twitter account with the same name this week.

The National Kidney Foundation asked me to guest blog for them this month and I discussed the project there, too. The address for this is: http://nkfstayinghealthy.wordpress.com/2013/06/06/what-is-it-and-how-did-i-get-it-early-stage-chronic-kidney-disease-experiences/  The NKF expects to promote it on their own Facebook page tomorrow. While this is not the first time they’ve asked me to write for them, each time they do I understand the honor it is and I thank them for the opportunity to spread CKD information via their site.

You already know DaVita (DaVita.com) has offered to supply Chronic Kidney Disease Educators to the tribes within sixty miles of Phoenix.  I have been speaking with the Health Directors of several tribes, but need help getting on the reservations.  I’ve found one or two reservations with Diabetes Education Program that we could easily piggyback on, but none with Chronic Kidney Disease Education Programs.  My appeal to my readers? Please, if you know anyone who is Native American, have him/her email me at myckdexperience.com or ask them for their number or email address and send it to me.

Book CoverIt’s funny: this blog started as publicity for the book and yet I hardly mention it any more.  Thank you to those of you who have bought or recommended the book. Thanks to some lovely people I met at Landmark Worldwide (formerly Landmark Education) the book is now in British Columbia and at the Evans Community Army Hospital in Colorado.  Any way this news can be spread is a good way in my book.  Oh, I meant that literally and figuratively!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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