Back to D

Those of you who know me personally know that this blog is a vacation for me right now.  Between Bear’s back issues, Nima’s upcoming gallbladder removal {that’s one way to rid yourself of a stone, aching backHmmm, that’s not funny, is it?} and my macula degeneration {which I persist in mispronouncing as macula conception for some reason}, it’s good to get back to D.  Vitamin D, that is.  Even more information piled up on my desk about it this week and that’s after not having enough room in last week’s blog to incorporate all the information I had at that point.

The following definition is from MedlinePlus @http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002405.htm.  This is a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine  From the National Institutes of HealthNational Institutes of Health which I trust and often cite in the blog:

“Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium. Calcium and phosphate are two minerals that are essential for normal bone formation. Throughout childhood, your body uses these minerals to produce bones. If you do not get enough calcium, or if your body does not absorb enough calcium from your diet, bone production and bone tissues may suffer.Vitamin D deficiency can lead to osteoporosis in adults or rickets in children.”

So, as adults, we basically need vitamin D to keep our bones healthy, although it does perform other functions such as “regulates calcium and phosphorous blood levels … affects the immune system.” This last definition is from the glossary of What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. By the way, thank you for keeping the sales going.  Every time I sell a book, it means another one I can donate. {Amazon.com or B&N.com. for digital or print.  Email me at: myckdexperience.com if you’d like a signed copy.}

I did manage to find out why my former nephrologist recommended supplemental vitamin D for me.  If he’d been as quick to answer the more important questions I had when I was his patient, he vit dmight not have become my former nephrologist.  But I do have to admit that as a newly diagnosed patient, I did not leave the poor man alone nor was I gentle in my demands for answers.  By the way, he was impressively gracious when I apologized for that behavior.

Apparently, vitamin D is routinely recommended for those over 60 since – statistically speaking – more than half the people in this age group have a vitamin D deficiency. Once you are tested, the level of the vitamin D in your blood determines whether you will be advised to take a low or high dose supplement. While the normal acceptable range is 30 to 100 {depending upon which lab you use}, mine was 29 back in 2009 when I started taking the supplements.  It did go up to 31 six months later. I still take the supplements to make certain it stays within range. 31 is so low in the acceptable range. I didn’t see it on any of this year’s lab results and intend to rectify that on my next lab date in two weeks.

As you know, I rarely write about children.  However, I noticed a MedPage Today article last week that suggested “There was an association between lower vitamin D levels and worse clinical outcome” in the need for pediatric heart-lung bypass.  It was far too technical for me, but you may want to take a look for yourself – especially since the article mentions pediatric studies “linking vitamin D deficiency with a number of condition such as asthma, acute respiratory infection, and cardiomyopathy {e.g. disease of the heart muscle}, as well as organ dysfunction and length of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit.” The address is: http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/HeartTransplanation/40384.

The day before the above article ran, MedPage Today ran another article discussing why low vitamin D levels in whites can lead to a heart risk, but the same low vitamin D levels don’t lead to heart risks in Blacks or Hispanics. I especially like Dr. Keith Norris’s comment on this “…reinforces what we’re seeing in medicine, [which] is a push toward personalized medicine where we’re really looking beyond what happens to a whole group of people, but how do we understand what’s happening at more [of] an individual level.” In other words, a person is a person is a person – even when it comes to their health.  You’ll find this one at: http://www.medpagetoday.com/Endocrinology/GeneralEndocrinology/40368races

MedPage Today seems to be carrying the blog today.  While there was no risk of heart disease due to low levels of vitamin D in Blacks, supplements could possibly lower blood pressure just a bit in Blacks.  So, if you don’t take them for one reason, you take them for another, I guess.  The researchers themselves are not certain, however, whether this study was long enough to prove anything. Still, I found it interesting and you might, too:  http://www.medpagetoday.com/Cardiology/Hypertension?38398.

Before you get down in the mouth about this information, let’s talk about vitamin D in kidney patients and gum disease {Get it? Down in the mouth? Gum disease? Oh well.} This time, the information is specifically for those with chronic kidney disease (hello!). According to Dr. Jessica Bastos back in April of this year, “This association seems to be mediated through an impairment in clearing bacterial infection due to a decrease in cathelicidin {e.g. antimicrobial polypeptides} production.” There is a purported correlation between low levels of vitamin D and low levels of cathelicidin production.  I don’t know about you, but I intend to print the blog and check that I took my vitamin D today.  My dentist is a nice guy, but this is my mouth we’re talking about. Take a gander: http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/NKF/38254.

I have many more articles in front of me, so I’m going to simply list the areas in which low vitamin D is involved:Book signing

  • cardiovascular
  • chronic kidney disease {the purpose of this blog, lest we forget}
  • health hip fracture risk
  • hepatitis B {Have you decided to take the inoculation against this?}
  • hypertension
  • stroke

Got how dangerous low levels of vitamin D can be?  Good.  Be ready to be confounded.  Another study links low levels of vitamin D with long life.  The  studies suggest, ” that low serum levels of vitamin D are a consequence rather than a cause of disease,” according to its authors.  This is a must read: http://www.medpagetoday.com/Genetics/GeneralGenetics/35767.

Wow, this could have been a four part blog.  Let’s hope you’re confused enough about the benefits {or lack thereof} of vitamin D supplementation to do a little research of your own.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Advertisements

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://gailraegarwood.wordpress.com/2013/07/15/back-to-d/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: