A Meta Is Going to Come? Shouldn’t That Be A Change is Going to Come?

Victorian clockYou may notice the blog is late today.  Blame the flu.  Scratch that.  I’ll take responsibility.  While I was debating whether or not it was time to take the flu shot all Chronic Kidney Disease patients are urged to take each year, the flu found me.  No kidding about this compromised immune system business.  I considered this a light case, but was just ordered back to bed… after over a week of laying low.

Keep in mind that this year’s flu’s vaccine only covers three or four of the many strains around, so you may end up with the flu even after having the shot.  My family doctor’s advice?  Once you’re well again have the inoculation and protect yourself from as many strains as you can.flu shot

Dr. Jamal Attalla is my new nephrologist and also a Landmark Graduate.  That’s where I met him way before I even knew he is a nephrologist.  I like that he is non-alarmist, non-paternalistic and easy going.  When I told him that 50 as an eGFR reading was my panic point, he very gently reminded me that readings will vary within a range depending on the day, your hydration, etc. – all variable factors.  I knew that.

Then he reminded me that after 35, we lose about 1% of our kidney function yearly.  I was under the impression it was ½% annually and thought that started at a much later age.  Finally, we talked about my reading of 48%. But I understood better now how that happened and am confident I can raise it again before I see him a year from now.

Enough about me, let’s get to that metabolic syndrome.  Oh, wait, that’s about me too.

Kibow has sent me quite a bit of information about using their probiotics as a method of treating chronic kidney disease.  I need to warn you that this is not an endorsement of their product.  I don’t know enough about it yet.

Along with their press release, they sent me a booklet entitled Kibow’s Educational Guide to Probiotics and Kidney Health written by Natarajan Ranganathan, Ph.D. and Henry D’Silva, M.D.  In the booklet, they discuss metabolic syndrome.  This part of that discussion lists five conditions in metabolic syndrome.  Only three are necessary to diagnose the syndrome:

“1. Abdominal obesity

2. high blood pressure

3. high blood sugarapple shaped

4. low levels of ‘good’ HDL cholesterol

5. high triglycerides”

I’d first heard about metabolic syndrome two years ago when I met an Aussie nurse at a friend’s house.  She assumed I knew all about it.  When I told her I didn’t and asked her to explain, she promised a coffee date to do just that.  We never had the date since she was called home quite suddenly and I forgot about the syndrome.

Then Kibow sent me their material.  Except for the high triglycerides and low levels of ‘good’ HDL cholesterol, I have all these conditions.  Granted, the abdominal obesity is self-diagnosed but you’d have to be blind (and I’m not yet) to miss it.

So what’s the big deal about metabolic syndrome?  By the way, meta does mean change.  According to The National Institutes on their Institute of Heart, Lungs, and Blood page at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/-topics/ms/:

“The term ‘metabolic’ refers to the biochemical processes involved in the body’s normal functioning. Risk factors are traits, conditions, or habits that increase your chance of developing a disease.”

The National Institutes is a fount of information on all topics that deal with your health.

heart attackAgain, the same question: what’s the big deal about metabolic syndrome?  Usually it’s stated backwards for Chronic Kidney Disease patients.  The MayoClinic at http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/metabolic%20syndrome/DS00522  tells us:

“Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of conditions — increased blood pressure, a high blood sugar level, excess body fat around the waist and abnormal cholesterol levels — that occur together, increasing your risk of heart disease, stroke and diabetes.”

Sometimes, Chronic Kidney Disease is mentioned as one of the diseases this syndrome puts you at risk for.  We, however, already have that, so why should we try to either avoid the syndrome completely or ameliorate it if we do have it?

Before I was diagnosed with Chronic Kidney Disease, I joyfully proclaimed Dr. Andrew Weil as my health guru and actually had pretty good health following his suggestions.  This is what he has to say,

“Doctors may also prescribe medications to lower blood pressure, control cholesterol or help you lose weight. Insulin sensitizers like Glucophage (Metformin) may be prescribed to help your body use insulin more effectively. It lowers blood sugar, which also seems to help lower cholesterol and triglycerides as well as decreasing appetite. The side effects of Metformin (often temporary) include nausea, stomach pain, bloating and diarrhea. A more serious side effect, lactic acidosis, can affect those with kidney or liver disease, severe heart failure or a history of alcohol abuse and is potentially, though rarely, fatal. Aspirin therapy is often given to help reduce risk of heart attack and stroke.”

Notice the mention of kidney damage and that of aspirin therapy.  We just can’t take the chance.

Take a look at his article yourself for even more information: http://www.drweil.com/drw/u/ART03193/Metabolic-Syndrome.html.Dr. Andrew WEil

Sometimes you just have to use your common sense.  We ARE already at risk of heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure as CKD sufferers.  Why would we take a chance of doubling our risk of developing these medical problems?  Don’t forget that while diabetes and high blood pressure can cause CKD, the reverse is true, too.

Kindle has offered me the opportunity to correct two spelling errors in the book.  What I want to know – since they are simple words – is how did spell check (and me for that matter) miss these in the first place? I find it amazing that not one single medical term was misspelled, but these two common words were.Book Cover

Keep an eye out for a new print/digital program they’ll be announcing.  It’s theirs so I’m not at liberty to discuss it until they announce it.  That is a bit of a tease, isn’t it?

Exercise is an essential part of slowing down the progression of your CKD, so kudos to Abby Wegerski (that’s my baby!) and her instruction partner, Tyler Robbins, on the One Year Plus dance celebration for Sustainable Blues this past weekend!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!blues

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