Sometimes I’m Down

Sometimes I get down, even when good things are happening in my life.  For example, the podcast discussing SlowItDown will be available at www.renaldiethq.com/008  as of 6 a.m. this Wednesday.  That’s a good thing, right?  And Bear felt up to going to a movie yesterday.  That’s another good thing.  Yet, my heart is heavy.kidney-book-cover

That, of course, got me to wondering if this had anything to do with Chronic Kidney Disease.  And it turns out, it does.  While this sadness seems to always to be short term for me, it comes and goes for no apparent reason.

So I did what I do best.  I researched… and found more than I’d expected about this subject.

Way back in 2009, The National Kidney Foundation, Inc. published their findings after performing a study,

“Depression has long been associated with end stage kidney disease, but a new study published today in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation, found that 20% of patients with early stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) also suffered from depression.”

You can read the rest of this short, but informative article at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/162766.php

sadLooking further back, I noticed that in 2006,  US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health published a study on its PubMed.gov site calling for “…further well-designed, longitudinal, survival studies to clarify the relationship better between depression and the different stages of renal dysfunction.”  This is a bit more technical, but you can find it at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16412828.

So there is a connection.  And I fell into that connection.  Which doesn’t mean that I’m clinically depressed or that I need treatment.  What it does mean is that I need to accept that I will have my down days now and again… and they will pass.

Somehow, it strikes me that everyone – CKD patient or not – has such days.

DaVita, the company that provides the trained educators who go into the community for SlowItDown, has this to say about depression and CKD:

“Depression can have many causes. In the case of someone who has just been diagnosed with chronic kidney disease there may be a lot of information to process about your physical health, which may lead to strong emotions about your life and how it may change. Similarly, once a person reaches end stage renal disease and begins dialysis, there are lifestyle adjustments to be made that could bring up feelings of despair. Many times these feelings are temporary; however, if you find you’re having difficulty don’t hesitate to get the help you need.”

They’ve got more information about this disease and depression on their website, particularly at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/living-with-ckd/depression-and-chronic-kidney-disease/e/4917sad woman

It made sense to look at the other end and see if depression caused CKD, just as diabetes and/or high blood pressure may be both caused by CKD and may be the cause of CKD. The following is from a private mental health center in Scottsdale.  It’s especially interesting because of the size and duration of the study – 5,785 subjects under scrutiny for 10 years.  It is also specific to CKD patients, although it is from 2010.

“This particular study concluded that the patient population suffering from depression was more likely to develop kidney disease and a decline in kidney function. These studies are still in the very early stages and should not alarm anyone suffering from depression but should act as a motivator to encourage individuals to seek help for their depressive symptoms. On the other hand, it is known that depression is very common among patients with chronic kidney disease and studies have shown that if the depression is left untreated; the prognosis of the kidney diseases is much worse.”

I found the above at http://psychiatristscottsdale.com/depression-and-kidney-disease/

Fresenius Medical Care, which is actually a dialysis provider, (no, I don’t need dialysis; I just liked the comforting information on their site.) offers this distinction between common mood swings and depression:

“You may already know that people with chronic diseases are even more prone to depression …. Depression is a broad term that describes a set of mood disorders. Some are long-term and some are short-term. Certain types are milder, while others are very strong and very harmful. For our purposes, we will place them into two groups: Common mood swings and Ongoing depression

Everyone has common mood swings. They may look like depression, because you feel sad, discouraged, lack energy, may lose sleep, or doubt yourself over some event or relationship. These moods last from a few hours to a few days, and then subside. Clinically speaking, this is not depression, but a normal response to life changes.”

There’s more at http://www.ultracare-dialysis.com/KidneyDisease/CopingWithKidneyDisease/Depression.aspx#sthash.WnJm91YA.dpuf

It makes sense to list the symptoms of actual depression here so you can tell the difference between common mood swings and depression.Book Cover

Make The Connection, a veterans’ support site at http://maketheconnection.net/conditions/depression?utm_source=adcenter&utm_medium=cpc&utm_term=symptoms%20of%20major%20depressive%20disorder&utm_content=signs&utm_campaign=depression tells us:

“Not everyone with depression has the same symptoms or feels the same way. One person might have difficulty sitting still, while another may find it hard to get out of bed each day. Other symptoms that may be signs of depression or may go along with being depressed include:

You need to be careful.  If you suspect you have depression, make sure you seek professional help.  Not everyone gets to the point of feeling suicidal, but you want to make sure you don’t.

firworksI love it!  Just by writing about depression (or common mood swings in my case), I feel cleared of it.  Maybe a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, but I find it helps me cope.

Until next week,

Keep living your life

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. great submit, very informative. I’m wondering why the other
    specialists of this sector do not realize this. You should proceed you writing.
    I’m sure, you have a huge readers’ base already!

    • Thanks, Summer. I often wonder that myself. It seems to be science based on common sense…or is it vice versa?


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