Good bye to National Kidney Month

I thought it over and decided to print the letter The National Kidney Foundation asked me to write for the syndicated Dear Annie column (Does anyone click on links anymore?). This is what was published on March 10, three days before World Kidney Day.

Annie’s Mailbox® by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar

Dear Annie:

I switched doctors six years ago — and my world fell apart. My new doctor insisted on all kinds of new tests, and I’m glad she did. Simple blood and urine tests let me know that there was a good possibility my kidneys weren’t functioning well.

I didn’t know that there are rarely any symptoms until the kidneys are failing. I didn’t know that one in three American adults is at risk for kidney disease. I didn’t know that high blood pressure and diabetes are two of the leading causes of this disease. But I learned quickly that early detection and proper treatment can slow its progress.

I learned so much in the following months: why I need to watch my weight, why regular exercise helps and why I need to make sure my high blood pressure is under control. I’ve been able to maintain the same degree of kidney function since being diagnosed, but not without lots of information and changes in my lifestyle.

March is National Kidney Month. March 13th is World Kidney Day. Won’t you help me join the National Kidney Foundation in urging Americans to learn about the risk factors and simple blood and urine tests for kidney disease? There are many free kidney health screenings around the country. The National Kidney Foundation at kidney.org provides information about these screenings and about staying healthy.

Thank you,

Gail Rae-Garwood

Glendale, Ariz.

the National Kidney Foundation, Inc.

And Annie’s response:

Dear Gail Rae-Garwood:

Thank you so much for sharing your story. We hope our readers will take your advice and check for screenings in their area or discuss their kidney health with their personal physicians. We are sure your letter will help many. Bless you.

We all know I’m well beyond getting a kick out of seeing my name in print (sort of), so why the letter? And why the great desire – let’s make that passion – to spread Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness?

Let me offer you some more statistics from The National Kidney Foundation at http://www.kidney.org/news/newsroom/factsheets/FastFacts.cfm :

1 in 9 United States citizens have CKD.

Most of them don’t know they have it.

Blacks are three times more likely to undergo kidney failure.Book Cover

Hispanics are 1.5 times more likely.

Fewer than 17,000 have kidney transplants annually.

118,000 are on the waiting list for a kidney.

13 people die while awaiting a kidney transplant daily.

If your kidneys fail, only dialysis or transplant can keep you alive.

415,000 are on dialysis.

About 180,000 more are living transplantees.

Medical payments increase from $15,000 to $70,000 annually from stage 4 to stage 5 CKD.

Medicare pays $30 billion (yes, billion) annually on treatment for kidney failure.

image

(Photo by Nima Beckie.  Subject: Greater New York Kidney Walk participant tying his orange scarf on a lamp post midway across the Brooklyn Bridge.)

The National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at http://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pubs/factsheets/kidney.htm offers more information:

More than 20 million people have CKD.

44% of new cases are caused by diabetes.

28% of new cases are caused by high blood pressure.warning

Between 1999 & 2010, more females than males developed CKD.

CKD occurrence increases in those over 50 years of age.

One of every three with diabetes develops CKD.

One of every five with high blood pressure develops CKD.

Men with CKD are twice as likely as women with CKD to develop kidney failure.

 

And now the National Institutes of Health at http://report.nih.gov/NIHfactsheets/ViewFactSheet :NIH

Cardiovascular disease is the main cause of death in dialysis patients.

Medicare is spending 6% of its payouts on kidney care.

Kidney disease runs in families.

warning

Of course, now you’re thoroughly grossed out and maybe scared out of your mind about ckd. Good! That’s exactly what I was aiming for.

I don’t see the point in you, your best buddy, your child, anyone who touches your life being diagnosed at stage 3 as I was. I wasted all of stage 1 and stage 2 when I could have been spending that time working to SLOW the decline of my kidneys so I could be one of the 80% of CKD patients who never needs dialysis or a transplant (and, no, I don’t mean because I already died).

And why did I was that much time instead of prolonging my life? I was never tested. That’s it. Simple, direct, and to the point. The fear here should be in having CKD and not knowing it instead of fearing you have it. If it turns out you don’t have CKD, I am extremely happy for you and maybe a bit envious. But if you do, let’s start working on prolonging your life NOW. You realize I’m not talking about a year or two, but decades here.

I want to see grandchildren, but my children aren’t ready for that yet. No problem. I am perfectly content to wait the five or ten years until they’re ready. By working hard at slowing the decline of my kidney function, I have the time to wait.baby-shots-5

The tests themselves are simple. Do you urinate? (You’d better be responding in the positive here or you’ve already got a bigger problem than CKD.) Then you can just urinate into a vial instead of the toilet. No special training needed. Ever have your blood drawn? Did you die from it? (I know, I know, but it’s a rhetorical question.) Okay, so have your blood drawn again and ask to be tested for Chronic Kidney Disease. It is not a separate blood test, but can be included in one you may be having anyway.

So it’s good bye to National Kidney Month, but not to taking care of yourself… say by having the blood and urine tests for CKD. Be a pal. If you can’t do it for yourself, do it for me. Don’t deprive the world of the pleasure of your company because you didn’t take the test.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

 

 

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