Higher and Higher

Today we start off with an announcement:  What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s profits have offset the cost of 2011’s donations of itself! That is not bragging about earnings, but rather an indication of just how many books were donated that year.Book Cover

And just why is that important to anyone but Gail, you ask.  Remembering my passion is to get the information about CKD out to the public, you’ll be able to see the connection after reading this:

“That guideline {e.g. providing a common language for communication among providers, patients and their families, investigators, and policy-makers and a framework for developing a public health approach to affect care and improve outcomes of CKD} led to a paradigm change in the approach to CKD, shifting from an uncommon disease often culminating in kidney failure and treatment by nephrologists to a common condition leading to death from cardiovascular disease. As a result, CKD is now accepted as a worldwide public health problem and the global guideline was developed to address this issue.”

This quote is from Andrew S. Levey, MD, co-chair of the NKF KDOQI workgroup that developed the 2002 CKD Guideline and Dr. Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Professor of Medicine at Tufts Medical Center in Boston.

NKF-logo_Hori_OBYou can probably figure out that NKF is the National Kidney Foundation, but you might need a little help with KDOQI.  That’s the acronym for their Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative.

2002 was a long time ago, but this statement was issued on December 27th, 2012, which was the night before the release of Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO).

By the way, many thanks to the National Kidney Foundation for each time they’ve asked me to write for them, suggested my name for articles about kidney disease awareness advocates, or offered me suggestions.

I’ve freely quoted from their page: http://www.kidney.org/news/newsroom/nr/Updated-CKD-Guideline-Enable-Physicians-Predict-More-Accurately.cfm, and yet, there’s even more information there.  Take a look for yourself.

So, CKD is now a common disease. And many people suffering from it die of cardiovascular disease. And hypertension can lead to that… and CKD.  Seems pretty circular.

Back to basics.  Hypertension or high blood pressure is defined on page 132 of What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

“A possible cause of CKD, 140/90 mm Hg is currently considered hypertension, a risk factor for heart disease and stroke, too.”

blood pressure 300dpi jpg

Now, about that 140/90…. According to the National Institutes of Health‘s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/hbp/printall-index.html, as of January, 2014,

“If you have diabetes or chronic kidney disease, a blood pressure of 130/80 mmHg or higher is considered HBP.”

Not only that, but blood pressure can change depending upon the arm that is being used to measure it, the time of day, whether you’ve just smoked (Just don’t!), had a cup of coffee or eaten just prior to the test, even if you’ve just woken up.  We all know what worry or stress can do to your blood pressure.  It seems even your race can make a difference.

_68045928_picture1A little less than a year ago, a team at London University College developed a wrist sensor to measure blood pressure as the blood leaves the heart itself. They discovered that blood pressure does not drop as much as thought during the night and that it might be possible to predict heart disease by using this monitoring.

I was particularly interested since I have a wrist monitor that my PCP (primary care physician) prefers I not use, thinking the measurement of the blood passing through the arm arteries more accurate.  I’d originally thought this was a wrist monitor but it doesn’t measure the blood flowing through the wrist.  This was a surprise to me and one I’d like to follow closely.  If you’d like to, also, take a look at http://www.bbc.com/news/health-22812477

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides a chart that makes clear why Blacks (or African Americans as they are referred to in the chart) are at 3.5 times the risk of CKD.  Look at the numbers, ladies and gents.  Hbp {high blood pressure} is the second leading cause of CKD. As usual, there’s so much more information about high blood pressure on their page: http://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/facts.htm.

Race of Ethnic Group Men (%) Women (%)
African Americans 43.0 45.7
Mexican Americans 27.8 28.9
Whites 33.9 31.3
All 34.1 32.7

 

 
 
   
   

It’s common knowledge that exercise can lower blood pressure, but how many readers know that it can also make your blood pressure medication more effective? On 4/23 of last year, The American Heart Association issued this statement:

“Alternative therapies such as aerobic exercise, resistance or strength training and isometric hand grip exercises could help people reduce blood pressure. Biofeedback and device-guided slow breathing reduced blood pressure a small amount. Due to their modest effects, alternative therapies can be used with — not as a replacement for — standard treatment.”

Rae%208x10%205792%20Sepia%20TinType[1]Oh, so that’s why I didn’t give away the isometric hand grips when we gave up 1880s competitive shooting.  Good for the trigger finger, just as good for the blood vessels – with proper medication.

Wait a minute.  Both the United Kingdom and the United States have populations with almost a third of the people suffering high blood pressure. Think about this.  What could this mean?

I don’t know if it’s because I’m getting older or not, but life seems to be moving so fast these days.  First there was Passover, then Easter, now Mother’s Day coming up with Father’s Day soon to follow and all those lovely birthdays and anniversaries in between.  How much stress is this?  How much stress is getting ready for your vacation?

No, I’m not saying these occasions should be ignored to lower our blood pressure.  I am saying we are the ones in control of how we treat these occasions.  Are they going to be occasions of stress?  Or gatherings with joint efforts and a relaxed delight in seeing the people involved? {And now you know why our wedding invitation – which I wrote – refers to me as “the Former Wannabe Hippie.”}

Happy Mother’s Day to all those who are mothers, wish they were, have mothers, or ever even remotely considered motherhood – male moms included.Mother's Day 2012  And what better gift for the mom in a family that has a CKD sufferer than…

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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