Baby, It’s Hot Outside

I just caught up to the fact that it’s June.  No, it wasn’t the calendar that told me, but the temperature.  We live in Arizona and its hot, dry heat or not.  That means cooling off any way you can. IMG_0584

This weekend, we finally took the three hour round trip drive to visit my friend and her family.  Her five year old daughter proudly showed off the family’s new addition since I’d been there last – a wonderful, cooling swimming pool.  I was tempted, but the 105% temperature kept me inside with the air conditioning.

That’s when I was offered some filtered water.  Did I want ice? I was asked.  I immediately shook my head.  “CKD, no ice, please.”

My friend cocked her head.  Her father had had a kidney transplant so she was well aware of the renal diet.  True, her father was treated in Korea, so there might have been some differences in treatment, but ice?

She asked me why and I immediately knew what I was going to blog about today.

For years, I’ve misunderstood something my nephrologist said.  I heard, “Don’t use ice.”  What he really said was something like, “If you use ice, you need to count the cubes in your fluid intake.”

I’ve spent time since Saturday researching the ice question and found nothing about avoiding ice.  I did find one warning about cold beverages from DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/overview/living-with-ckd/seven-summertime-precautions-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/4894 : “Be careful of very cold beverages, which can cause stomach cramps.”

The lesson I learned from this misunderstanding of what I thought I heard is to recheck what you think you know every once in a while.  After all, I thought I had the diet down pat.

Hah!  I forgot that I was terrified when I was first diagnosed and thinking I was going to die imminently. I adhered strictly to what I heard and, apparently, adhered just as strictly to what I thought I’d heard.

sun-graphic1Wait a minute… maybe I need not have avoided the heat, either.  I researched that, too.  Just as with ice, I found a general warning about the elderly, but nothing specific to CKD.

““With the elderly, the heat accumulates in their bodies over hours to days. If you have a long heat spell, the elderly person accumulates heat through each of those days because they can’t really eliminate or dissipate the heat,” explains Dr. Crocker. “Sometimes it’s because of a medication, sometimes it’s a lack of mobility, or in some cases the older you get, the less active your sweat glands are, so it becomes harder and harder for you to eliminate heat.”

This is from The Austin Diagnostic Clinic at http://www.adclinic.com/2012/08/hot-summer-days-challenging-dangerous/#.U5X-ZKROUY0.

By the way, National Public Radio (NPR) has a fascinating blog about the term ‘elderly’ at http://www.npr.org/2013/03/12/174124992/an-age-old-problem-who-is-elderly.  While 65 was the accepted age for elderly here in the USA for quite some time, this is now under debate.  I, however, still envision an elderly person as frail and delicate… something I’m not.

But, again, there was nothing specific to CKDers in the quote above.  In thinking about it, I began to wonder if the risk of dehydration from the summer heat is the problem for us.

According to The National Kidney Fund at http://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/kidneysnottowork.cfm

“Kidneys can become damaged if they are not getting good blood flow. This can happen if you become dehydrated or seriously ill.”

Aha!  This was starting to make sense.  WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/tc/dehydration-topic-overview explains this for us.

“Usually your body can reabsorb fluid from your blood and other body tissues. But by the time you become severely dehydrated, you no longer have enough fluid in your body to get blood to your organs, and you may go into shock, which is a life-threatening condition.”ice water

Okay, so we know we need to drink fluids, especially in hot water. Our kidneys are already having a hard time cleaning our blood effectively and we are reabsorbing ineffectively cleaned blood prior to this point of dehydration.

But how do we know if we’re becoming dehydrated? What are the symptoms? I turned to my standby, the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/dehydration/basics/symptoms/CON-20030056 for the symptoms of mild dehydration:

  • Dry, sticky mouth
  • Sleepiness or tiredness — children are likely to be less active than usual
  • Thirst
  • Decreased urine output
  • No wet diapers for three hours for infants
  • Few or no tears when crying
  • Dry skin
  • Headache
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness or lightheadedness

And then I laughed.  I experience one or more of those symptoms at one time or another.  The clinic does make the extremely helpful point that the color of your urine is a good indicator of dehydration. If it’s clear or light in color, you’re fine.  If it’s dark, start drinking!  Interestingly enough, having CKD is already a risk factor for dehydration so let’s not make it worse for ourselves.

So how do we prevent dehydration?  What can we do if we can see if starting?

Obviously, drinking more fluids will help. I’m limited to 64 ounces in a day, but I get creative in summer. Sometimes, I will have that half cup of ice cream.  Watermelon magically (hah!) appears on the table.  Now that I realize I don’t have to avoid ice, they too will become part of both the anti-dehydration campaign and the anti-dehydration campaign in our house.watermelon

I’m not sure if this is common knowledge, but dehydration can also cause kidney stones.  If you don’t have the fluid in your body to prevent crystallization, crystallization is more apt to happen.  Kidney stones are,

“Stones caused in the urinary tract and kidney when crystals adhere to each other.  Most of those in the kidneys are made of calcium.”

(Love this author’s style).  That’s from What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, p. 133.

Talking about the book, it’s clear that digital outsells print and that in foreign markets, England outsells other countries.  I wonder if it’s the languages.  I’d thought about translations, but how would I be able to edit the texts if I don’t know the languages myself?  I’ve tried online translation, but the results are never quite what I originally wrote in English.

May you stay cool and hydrated.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!Book Cover

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