Not ON the Water, IN It

It’s hot, 112 degrees already and summer has just started. Much as I’d love to, I can’t stay in the house writing all day, every day. I also need to exercise on a daily basis… as do you if you have Chronic Kidney Disease.

What’s that? Why do you have to exercise if you have CKD, you ask? Let’s go back to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, page 100, for the answer to that one. (Digital book owners, don’t forget to use the search document function instead of the page number.)Book Cover

“I knew exercise was important to control my weight. It would also improve my blood pressure and lower my cholesterol and triglyceride levels. The greater your triglycerides, the greater the risk of increasing your creatinine. There were other benefits, too, although you didn’t have to have CKD to enjoy them: better sleep, and improved muscle function and strength. But, as with everything else you do that might impinge upon your health, check with your doctor before you start exercising.

I researched, researched and researched again. Each explanation of what exercise does for the body was more complicated than the last one I read. Keeping it simple, basically, there’s a compound released by voluntary muscle contraction. It tells the body to repair itself and grow stronger. The idea is to start exercising slowly and then intensity your activity.”

I’ve mentioned water walking as an exercise and gotten quite a few questions about it. I have to admit I’d never heard of it before I moved to Arizona and met Bear. His house is in a senior citizen community that has a community center with a water walking pool.

It was exciting to be doing something I’d never done before and questioned him unmercifully, although he kept telling me you get in a pool that has lanes and walk. I could not visualize it, so I went online to see what it looked like. Then I couldn’t imagine what it would feel like, especially for someone who always wants to be near water rather than in it.

The pool was enormous to my water walking pool virgin eyes. There were shady parts and sunny parts. Uh-oh, I was going to have to get a hat with a bigger brim to protect my neck and shoulders from the sun, too. Oh, and water soluble sunscreen.sun hat

I couldn’t make sense of the arrows on the pool floor and the curvy shoulder high dividing walls between lanes until I was actually in the pool. I started out in waist high water following the arrows and keeping in the lanes they pointed to on different sides of the dividers until I found myself in chin high water when we completed our first circuit.

water walkingNow it all made sense. It was just like traffic lanes and directional markings on the road when you drive! Of course, waist and chin high are relative. I’m 5’5’, so Bear’s 5’10” meant the water was not as high on him.

There’s another benefit to water walking if you have arthritis. You’ve read my complaints about arthritis here and even in the Wall Street Journal column by Laura Landro about CKD Awareness activists (I still prefer being called an advocate). If you missed it, you can read that article in the January 20th, 2014 blog.

I went to the site of The Arthritis Foundation at http://www.arthritistoday.org/what-you-can-do/staying-active/activity-types/water-walking.php and read the following:

“Like all water exercises, water walking is easy on the joints. ‘The water’s buoyancy supports the body’s weight, which reduces stress on the joints and minimizes pain,’ says Jones [an aquatic coordinator]. ‘And it’s still a great workout. Water provides 12 times the resistance of air, so as you walk, you’re really strengthening and building muscle.’ You do not bear weight while swimming and walking, however, so you’ll still need to add some bone-building workouts to your routine.”

My almost constantly complaining knees were quiet in the water walking pool. My slightly painful hip didn’t seem to hurt. And, best of all, my elbows weren’t aching. I’m sold. What makes it even better is that water walking strengthens your muscles.

The bottom of the pool is purposely rough to prevent slips. After one circuit without water shoes, I knew I’d have to get some. While they were not severely damaged, I did notice annoying little scraps and cuts on the soles of my feet, especially my toes.water walking shoes

That probably means I was walking on my toes, something the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/fitness/multimedia/aquatic-exercise/sls-20076730 suggests you NOT do.

“In water that’s about waist-high, walk across the pool swinging your arms like you do when walking on land. Avoid walking on your tiptoes, and keep your back straight. Tighten your abdominal muscles to avoid leaning too far forward or to the side.”

I’ll also have to work on tightening my abdominals since I walked into the wall or the dividers a few times. I knew I wasn’t drunk (I don’t drink), so now I know why this happened.

A non-medical site, Ask.com, had some information about how you can water walk in any water. After all, not everyone has access to a water walking pool.

• Walk forward and backward with short steps, long steps, average steps, or step kicks.

• Move in a pattern of a circle or square. Be sure to go in both directions to balance the demands on your body.

There are more suggestions about technique at their site: http://spas.about.com/od/exercise/a/waterwalking.htm

SlowItDown business card

The big news here these days is that SlowItDown and What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease are combining their Facebook and Twitter accounts. When you want to catch up with SlowItDown, just go to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s Facebook and Twitter accounts. There will still be a daily tidbit about our disease on both. It occurred to me that I was doing double duty (Say that three times fast!) since both deal with the same issue.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. I miss our pool. My one daughter (have 4) is a swimmer and she had me doing water aerobics. Sadly we had to move. Miss the pool more than anything. Thanks for the article and the reminder of how much I enjoyed water aerobics.

    • One of our almost sons-in-law has recommended water aerobics to us. I’m eager to try that, too. Many thanks for letting me know you enjoyed the blog.


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