Life Is Just A Bowl Of Cherries

Here I was all ready to write about sulfur drugs and CKD or hearing and CKD when I received an email from  Cindy Bruggner who’d just bought some good looking bing cherries but wasn’t sure whether to eat them or not.  We all know that cherries simply don’t last that long, so – Cindy – this one’s for you.

cherries

The big issue about eating cherries when you have Chronic Kidney Disease is their potassium content. I went straight to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease to see what I’d written about this. In the Glossary (on page 134) I found this definition:

“One of the electrolytes, important because it counteracts sodium’s effect on blood pressure.”

While that’s true, we’re going to need more to help Cindy out. So I turned to Chapter 8: The Renal Diet (page 75).

“Potassium is something you need to limit when you have CKD despite the fact that potassium not only dumps waste from your cells but also helps the kidneys, heart and muscles to function normally.  Too much potassium can cause irregular heartbeat and even heart attack.  This can be the most immediate danger of not limiting your potassium….

Book Cover…Check your blood tests. 3.5-5 is considered a safe level of potassium.  You may have a problem if your blood level of potassium is 5.1-6 and you definitely need to attend to it if it’s above 6.  Speak to your nephrologist ….”

I checked with the National Kidney Foundation http://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/potassium.cfm about those levels just to be sure they hadn’t changed since the book was published.  They haven’t.

That got me to wondering why cherries are considered good for the general population, but not CKD patients. So, of course, I did a little research.  Green and Healthy at http://www.greenandhealthy.info/kidneydisease.html#ckd suggests those without kidney disease eat cherries for the following reason:

“According to research from Michigan State University tart cherries contain anthocyanins [Thought you might like to know this means natural pain relieving and anti-inflammatory properties], bioflavonoids, which inhibit the enzymes Cyclooxygenase-1 and -2, and prevent inflammation in the body. These compounds have similar activity as aspirin, naproxen and ibuprofen.”

Sounds good to me since we can’t take some of those pain relievers, but cherries have the same effect.  Something was nagging at me though.  Back to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. As I read page 3, I realized why:

“The problem with unregulated minerals, such as sodium and potassium is that these minerals are needed to remain healthy but too much in the bloodstream becomes toxic. The kidneys remove these toxins and change them into urine that enters the bladder via the ureter.”kidney location

Well, healthy kidneys do, but just how effective are your compromised kidneys at doing this job? I went to DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/lifestyle/top-15-healthy-foods-for-people-with-kidney-disease/e/5347, but in addition to the usual warnings about potassium levels, I found this:

“1/2 cup serving fresh sweet cherries = 0 mg sodium, 160 mg potassium, 15 mg phosphorus

Cherries have been shown to reduce inflammation when eaten daily. They are also packed with antioxidants and phytochemicals that protect the heart.”

Does that mean they’re good for CKD patients?

From my reading, I’ve also garnered the information that cherries can help with iron deficiencies, lower blood pressure, improve sleep, help with gout, and lower the risk of heart disease.

Or can they? Remember that too much potassium can actually cause an irregular heartbeat or possibly stop your heart.

Oh Cindy, I’m sure I’ve only added to your confusion.  Watch your potassium levels.  Look them up on your last blood test.  Why not give your nephrologist a call, too, just to be sure.  Do you have a renal nutritionist? He or she would know far better than I since this question of whether to eat the cherries or not is so individualized.

Then we have stages.  I am stage 3, which I used to think was early stage (hence the book’s title) but now realize is moderate damage.  I don’t know what stage Cindy is, but I do know the dietary rules change when you reach end stage and I’m going to guess they’re even different for those on different kinds of dialysis and those who are transplants.stages chart

So Cindy’s question is sort of asking me which sexual position is best for her.  I’m purposely being provocative here so that you’ll see just how individualized the renal diet is. What’s best for you depends on your needs.  Call the nutritionist!

Knowing End Stage Renal Disease is not my area of expertise, I took a peek at National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), A service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)National Institutes of Health (NIH), at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/KUDiseases/pubs/eatright/index.aspx#potassium anyway to see what dialysis patients can eat.  Apparently, potassium could be a problem here, too. This is what I found:

“Potassium is a mineral found in many foods, especially milk, fruits, and vegetables. It affects how steadily your heart beats. Healthy kidneys keep the right amount of potassium in the blood to keep the heart beating at a steady pace. Potassium levels can rise between dialysis sessions and affect your heartbeat. Eating too much potassium can be very dangerous to your heart. It may even cause death.”

Okay, cherries can be a problem.  Then I started wondering if it mattered what type of cherries they were. I found at least 18 different kinds, but none of the websites discussed potassium.

I learned more about cherries and potassium than I thought I wanted to.  I’m sure you did, too, but I offer you the same advice I offered Cindy: check with your renal nutritionist or nephrologist – always.  I am not a doctor, but rather someone who researches CKD on a layman’s level.  Cindy, thanks for asking.

Holy cow!  July 4th weekend is sneaking up on us!  I’m looking forward to as much water walking as we can get in since two, not one, but two neighbors have offered us the use of their backyard pools – one actually a lap pool – and we have discovered our neighborhood pool which charges only $20 per person a season.  We may not have the ocean out here, but we’ve got lots of pools.  Here’s hoping you enjoy your holiday weekend.

Kidney Book CoverWhoops!  Almost forgot to include that SlowItDown will now be sharing the book’s Facebook page, twitter account, website (http.gail-rae.com), email address (myckdexperience@gmail.com) and telephone number (602-509-4965).  I was getting run down trying to run the two separately in addition to my personal one!

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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