I Can Hear The Blood Rushing in My Ears

July 4thHope you had a wonderful Independence Day weekend. Ours was filled with water walking thanks to the Vlasitys, Olsens, and Artecs who all offered their pools for Bear’s physical therapy, board games after we discovered our neighbors – Linda and Mike Olsen – played our favorite domino game, a movie (Train Your Dragon, Two… oh yes!), plus dinner out at Macaroni Grill, a restaurant where I actually have choices that fit in the renal diet. We even got to the only remaining bookstore on our side of The Valley of The Sun. Quiet, fun activities.

During that time, my blog was in the back of my mind. It’s always in the back of my mind. Which is why I can’t stop writing it, by the way. This weekend, I kept thinking about the subtle connection between hearing and Chronic Kidney Disease.

The topic came about in the usual way: I complained of hearing poorly and my ever vigilant primary care doctor, Dr. Zhao of Deer Valley Family Practice right around the Arizona style corner (three and a half miles), suggested I might want to have my hearing tested by an audiologist. This was right after I passed the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit hearing test with flying colors despite my complaints.

Off I went to Dr. Kristin Wells of North Valley Audiology… for the third time in five years. Her assessment was that my hearing was just fine. Go figure, but she did applaud me for telling her I had CKD (and sleep apnea, but that’s another story…uh, blog).test

Why did I do that you ask? Well, as I wrote on my March 15th, 2011, blog during National Kidney Month:

“Research shows that hearing loss is common in people with moderate chronic kidney disease. As published in the American Journal of Kidney Diseases and highlighted on the National Kidney Foundation web site, a team of Australian researchers found that older adults with moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD) have a higher prevalence of hearing loss than those of the same age without CKD.”

You can enter hearing in the topic search to the right of this blog read the rest of that blog.

earHow moderate CKD and hearing are connected is another matter, one that apparently isn’t as well documented. Here’s what I found at http://www.hear-it.org/More-than-half-with-Chronic-Kidney-Disease-have-hearing-loss – which has an online hearing test – and not most, but all of the other sites I searched. This comes from the same study I used in my 2011 blog. That study was completed in 2010… four years ago.

“University of Sydney, said:
The link between hearing loss and CKD can be explained by structural and functional similarities between tissues in the inner ear and in the kidney. Additionally, toxins that accumulate in kidney failure can damage nerves, including those in the inner ear. Another reason for this connection is that kidney disease and hearing loss share common risk factors, including diabetes, high blood pressure and advanced age.”cochlear tissue

I couldn’t visual this inner ear tissue, so I started looking for images. You can see them all over this page.

Suddenly it became clear. If toxins are – well – toxic to our bodies, that includes our ears. My old friend The Online Etymology Dictionary at http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?term=toxic tells us the word toxic is derived directly from Late Latin toxicus “poisoned.”

Now I got it. Moderate CKD could be poisoning our bodies with a buildup of toxins. Our ears and the nerves in them are part of our body. Damaged nerves may cause hearing loss. I’d just never thought of it that way before. Sometimes all it takes is that one last piece of the puzzle to fall in place.

Hmmm. High blood pressure is the second most common leading cause of CKD and it can also lead to hearing loss. Let’s take a look at that.

ear tissueAccording to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/hearing-loss-causes-symptoms-treatment “Certain illnesses, such as heart disease, high blood pressure, and diabetes, put ears at risk by interfering with the ears’ blood supply.” Of course!

I went right to What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease to figure out how. On page 97 (you know the drill: digital readers use the search function), blood pressure 300dpi jpgthere is a diagram from The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health that demonstrates how high blood pressure is caused… and if you read on, you’ll read about the problems high blood pressure causes.

This is the sentence that clarified the issue for me (page 99): “Humans have 10 pints of blood that are pumped by the heart through the arteries to all the other parts of the bodies.” That would include the ears. Moderate CKD might mean that blood is tainted by the toxins our compromised kidneys could not rid us of.

I had been hoping for more recent research, but sometimes you just have to deal with what you get.

Talking about getting, Dr. Nick Held of ASU sent a long involved comment. Basically it is full of opportunities to study about Chronic Kidney Disease. While most of it is a bit too medical for me, you may be looking for just this opportunity, so here’s the address: http://www.nejm.org/toc/nejm/medical-journal. You’re looking for Vol. 371, No. 1. Many thanks, Nick, and thank you for the accolades, too.

Things are quiet here this summer. No word yet from either the radio show or the article in Medicare’s publication about when they’re going to happen. No word on SlowItDown either. I’ll bet people are going directly to DaVita.com for their Chronic Kidney Disease education. You are, aren’t you? Hey, get that CKD education any way you can.

The book lives! I do believe there may be another book about CKD fairly soon: The Book of Blogs. This blog was born when an Indian nephrologist contacted me to explain that he Book Coverthought What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease was just what his new patients needed, but they were too poor to even pay bus fare to keep their appointments.

I was very new to social media, but figured if I wrote a blog, he translated it and then printed it, his patients who could keep their appointments could read it and bring it back to their villages with them for other CKD patients to read.

Now I’m looking at it the other way: I have more than a few readers who are not comfortable with anything electronic. They need a book in print. I’m seeing what I can do about that, folks.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

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