Number Three on The List

“Other studies have suggested that once diagnosed with kidney disease, weight loss may slow kidney disease progression, but this is the first research study to support losing belly fat and limiting phosphorus consumption as a possible way to prevent kidney disease from developing.”Vassalotti Photo June2010  Dr. Joseph Vassalotti, chief medical officer at the National Kidney Foundation  11/3/13

Why has this little gem not caused more positive uproar?  We already accept that high blood pressure and diabetes are the two leading causes of Chronic Kidney Disease and that preventing each may lessen your chances of developing the disease.  Are we now looking at a third deterrent to developing CKD?

When I first wrote What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, I was so eager to spread the word that I called Dr. Vassalotti and asked him to read the book.  He was encouraging, and oh-so-willing to discuss anything CKD.  I immediately trusted and believed what he had to say… and believe him now, especially with the research studies behind him.

So what is phosphorous, anyway?  I defined it in my book as

“One of the electrolytes, works with calcium for bone formation, but too much can cause calcification where you don’t want it: joints, eyes, skin and heart.”Book Cover

Hmmm, I don’t see any relation to preventing CKD there.  I researched my usual sites and found that they also discussed the effects of phosphorus on the bones in CKD, but nothing about how limiting it might prevent the disease from developing. 

You can find an abstract of the original study (but it’s rough going unless you have a medical background) at: http://www.ajkd.org/article/S0272-6386(13)00825-1/abstract. By the way, this is a well-respected journal, should you be interested in taking a gander. 

It was too technical for me, so I keep referring to the Medical News Today article.  In research work, this is called a secondary source.

AJKD Okay, let’s take another look at The American Journal of Kidney Disease’s information about this study as it was covered by Medical News Today at: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/268144.php.

But first, here’s what I found about phosphorous at MedlinePlus, a service of the U.S. National Library of Medicine at The National Institutes of Health   (http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002424.htm),

“It plays an important role in how the body uses carbohydrates and fats. It is also needed for the body to make protein for the growth, maintenance, and repair of cells and tissues.”

This is new information to me and makes sense according to the article in Medical News Today.  So we’re not just dealing with phosphorus’s importance in bone health, but in the body’s use of carbs and fats.

If phosphorous is not doing its job as an electrolyte, there’s a good chance you are gaining weight. Think about all those carbs and fats not properly being eliminated from your body.  More caloric intake equals fat development.  (I do realize we’re not taking exercise into account here.)

This sentence from The Huffington Post’s Healthy Living section last March caught my attention in a big way: “Belly fat is also much more inflammatory than fat located elsewhere in the body and can create its own inflammatory chemicals (as a tumor would). “ You can read the entire article at: belly fathttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/21/body-fat-facts_n_2902867.html

Inflammatory?  Isn’t CKD an inflammatory disease? I went to The National Center for Biotechnology Information, which took me to the National Library of Medicine and finally to a National Institute of Health study at http://http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3332073/ for the answer.

“The persistent inflammatory state is common in diabetes and chronic kidney disease (CKD).”

This is a lot to take in at once.  What it amounts to is that another way to possibility prevent the onset of CKD is to lower your phosphorous intake so that you don’t accumulate belly fat.  All we need to know now is how this possible inflammatory state can cause CKD.

Thank you to Medical News Today for making it clear in this article:

“The researchers from Johns Hopkins claim that reducing your waist circumference and cutting down on dietary phosphorus have been linked to lower levels of protein in the urine (albuminuria). The presence of this protein in urine is one of the first indicators of kidney disease.”

chocolateI exercise.  I follow the kidney diet.  What was I eating before I developed CKD that might have contributed to its onset?

Although I considered myself a health nut, I loved chocolate…milk chocolate. Yep, high in phosphorous.

As I researched different sites, I realized being a health nut was exactly the opposite of what I should have been.  All of the following are on the majority of high phosphorous food lists: quinoa, oats, bran, milk, cheese, whole wheat, whole grain, dried beans or peas, brown rice or wild rice.

If you’re identifying with me, do not – I repeat: do not – beat yourself up.  Remember the connection between high phosphorous levels, belly fat, and CKD is new information.

Here’s a hint: avoid processed foods since they have phosphorous added to extend their shelf life.  I learned that somewhere along the way in my CKD journey, probably from my renal nutritionist. You can also add a recent product, flavored water, to the list of high phosphorous foods to avoid.

Unfortunately, phosphorous is not usually listed on labels.  Although, I did see PHOS listed once or twice.  Hopefully, it will become common usage to list phosphorous in the near future.

When I was a young woman, I wondered why I should keep up with the latest scientific research.  After all, new discoveries were making what I already learned obsolete on a daily basis.  Now I know why.

I have two daughters, two step-daughters, three almost sons-in-law, and a husband who loves me.  I want to be around to be part of their futures.  If it takes constant monitoring of the new CKD information, I’ll do it.

We leave for New York on Wednesday and I’m finally getting excited.  One or two medical emergencies in New York both kept me from being excited and wanting to hurry up to be there at the same time.  They are being resolved as I write.

AND I get to see Nima, my one child still living in New York. Oh, and friends of very, very long standing and my niece and her family.  Hah! I’m so excited now I can barely sit still to type. Nothing like dancing at the computer.NYC

Until next week when I’ll publish from The Big Apple,

Keep living your life!

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