What If You Don’t Go?

NYCWe just got back from New York, which included stays in three different places. Only one- my buddy’s pied `a terre in Bay Ridge had a private bath… one bathroom for the two of us.  In my niece’s house on Long Island, we shared two bathrooms with two other adults and four children.  In Manhattan, we shared two baths with twenty other tourists. This didn’t exactly make for instant bathroom use when you needed it.

To add insult to injury, I’ve grown very accustomed to Arizona’s immaculate public bathrooms with automatic faucets, flushes, soap dispensers, and towels. Let’s just say New York has quite a bit of room for improvement in this area. The end result was that I didn’t use the facilities as often as I needed to.

And I started wondering… what’s happens to the urine you don’t void?

toliet First things first: according to National Kidney and Urologic Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NKUDIC), A service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)National Institutes of Health (NIH)  at http://kidney.niddk.nih.gov/kudiseases/pubs/yoururinary/#points,

“The amount of urine a person produces depends on many factors, such as the amounts of liquid and food a person consumes and the amount of fluid lost through sweat and breathing.”

It was New York; it was not only hot, it was humid.  I was drinking my allotted 64 ounces of liquid daily. I was breathing – as usual – and I was sweating (perspiring?) quite a bit. Of course, I was eating, too.

In What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Kidney Disease, I explained that Book signing

“Ingested food and liquid are digested in the stomach and bowels, and then absorbed in the blood.  A renal artery carries the blood waste and water to the kidneys while a renal vein carries the filtered and sieved waste from the kidneys…..Additional important jobs of the kidneys are removing liquid waste from your body and balancing the minerals in the body. The two liquid waste products are urea which has been broken down from protein by the digestive system and creatinine which is a byproduct of muscle activity.

The problem with unregulated minerals, such as sodium and potassium is that these minerals are needed to remain healthy but too much in the bloodstream becomes toxic. The kidneys remove these toxins and change them into urine that enters the bladder via the ureter.  Look at the picture of a front view of your internal organs …. [You can see]  the kidneys, then the ureter above the bladder.  Below the bladder is the urethra, the passage to the outside of your body. This is, of course, a highly simplified explanation.  The toxins would build up and poison you if the kidneys were damaged.”

This is right at the beginning of the book on pages 2 and 3.

Now that we know how it works, we can go back to my original question: What if you don’t urinate when your bladder is full?urinary

Well, maybe we should explore the bladder a bit more. WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/urinary-incontinence-oab/picture-of-the-bladder tells us the following about the bladder:

“The bladder stores urine, allowing urination to be infrequent and voluntary. The bladder is lined by layers of muscle tissue that stretch to accommodate urine. The normal capacity of the bladder is 400 to 600 mL. During urination, the bladder muscles contract, and two sphincters (valves) open to allow urine to flow out. Urine exits the bladder into the urethra, which carries urine out of the body.”

So, there I was with a full bladder and my body telling me to empty it, but I didn’t.  What happened to the urine?

bladderIt’s time to mention that the ureters don’t have any way to stop the urine flowing back into the kidneys if you don’t void.  There are two sphincters at the bottom of your bladder leading into the urethra, but you can only voluntarily control one of them.

Interesting fact: the urethra is longer in men because it passes through the penis.  Sorry fact: because our urethras are shorter, we women are more prone to urinary tract infections.

Uh-oh, urine was moving back into my poor, already compromised kidneys. This urine flow back could further damage the capillaries and tubules making them even less effective at filtering my blood. The kidney’s pelvis and calyces – their central collection region – might become dilated, causing hydronephrosis.  Or I might end up with a kidney infection from the bacteria forced back in.  This is called pyelonephritis.

Hang on there.  I’m going to use the medical dictionary at http://www.merriam-webster.com/medical  for some definitions here.

CALYX (plural ca·lyx·es or ca·ly·ces  also ca·li·ces): a cuplike division of the renal pelvis surrounding one or more renal papillae

CAPILLARY a: resembling a hair especially in slender elongated form   b: having a very small borekidney interior

HYDRONEPHROSIS: cystic distension of the kidney caused by the accumulation of urine in the renal pelvis as a result of obstruction to outflow and accompanied by atrophy of the kidney structure and cyst formation

RENAL PAPILLA: the apex of a renal pyramid which projects into the lumen of a calyx of the kidney and through which collecting tubules discharge urine

RENAL PELVIS: a funnel-shaped structure in each kidney that is formed at one end by the expanded upper portion of the ureter lying in the renal sinus and at the other end by the union of the calyxes of the kidney  

TUBULE: a small tube; especially: a slender elongated anatomical channel

But, wait before you get all excited about the damage I’ve done to myself – or worse, yourself. You should know it would take a tremendous amount of flow back before any of this happens.  Be aware of your urge to urinate, follow through if you can, and don’t worry if you can’t every once in a while (But remember that I’m not a doctor.) And I wonder why I’ve felt the urge to urinate the whole time I’ve been writing today’s blog.

Many thanks to the oddly informative website http://www.straightdope.com/ for pointing me in the right direction for answers to my question. kidney-book-coverI have a question for all of you:  I am thinking of turning the previous blogs into a book; is that something you’d be interested in?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Oh, I think your blogs are an ongoing source of information and why not a book? When I found your blog I mined it for all I could get, but now I am happy with your additions over time. After all, we can only learn so much at a time. I think this is an excellent idea.

    • The decision’s been made (with your help and those of my social media readers). The blog will become a book. Thanks for your valuable input, Mary.


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