Pro on Probiotics?

probioticsMy husband takes probiotics and they work for him. This is why he takes them, as explained by http://www.theralac.com/why-take-probiotics.aspx:

“For healthy people, probiotics can help boost the immune system and increase the absorption of important minerals and nutrients. For people with digestive problems, probiotics can be taken in higher doses to help regain digestive balance.”

I thought they might be worth a try, but my nephrologist disagreed.  We had our discussion about this right after I’d been a guest on a radio show during which the pros and cons of using probiotics for chronic kidney disease were discussed. This was just about the same time the information I’d requested from Kibow arrived.  This is from their website at www.Kibow.com:

“Certain probiotic microorganisms can utilize urea, uric acid and creatinine and other toxins as its nutrients for growth. Overloaded and impaired kidneys have a buildup of these poisonous wastes in the bloodstream. Probiotic microorganisms multiply, thereby creating a greater diffusion of these uremic toxins from the circulating blood across the lining of the intestinal walls into the bowel. This increased microbial growth is excreted along with the feces (which is normally 50% microbes by weight).

Enteric toxin reduction technology uses probiotic organisms to transform the colon into a blood cleansing agent, which, with the aid of microbes, indirectly removes toxic wastes and helps eliminate them as fecal matter. Consequently, a natural treatment for kidney failure is possible to maintain a healthy kidney function with the oral use of Renadyl™. The patented, proprietary probiotics in Renadyl™ have been clinically tested and shown to be safe, free of serious side effects, and effective in helping the body rid itself of harmful toxins when taken for as long as 6 months.”

Let’s slow down a bit.  We’ll need some definitions, so I turned to my favorite user friendly online medical dictionary, www.merriam-webster.com for the following:

CREATININE: (I know you know this one; this is just a reminder) a white crystalline strongly basic compound C4H7N3O formed from creatine and found especially in muscle, blood, and urine

ENTERIC: of, relating to or affecting the intestines; broadly:  alimentary

PROBIOTIC: a preparation (as a dietary supplement) containing a live bacterium (as lactobacilli) that is taken orally to restore beneficial bacteria to the body; also:  a bacterium of such a preparation

UREA: a substance that contains nitrogen, is found in the urine of mammals and some fish, and is used in some kinds of fertilizerdictionary

URIC ACID: a white odorless and tasteless nearly insoluble acid C5H4N4O3 that is the chief nitrogenous waste present in the urine especially of lower vertebrates (as birds and reptiles), is present in small quantity in human urine, and occurs pathologically in renal calculi {a little help here, this means a concretion usually of mineral salts around organic material found especially in hollow organs or ducts} and the tophi of gout

What I found on Kibow is a mouthful… and an advertisement.  I am not endorsing Renadyl.  However, there is an animation at http://www.renadyl.com/How-Renadyl-works which visually clarifies the information above. While I understood the process better after watching the animation, I’m still leery of that six month warning, especially after I found this at the bottom of one of their pages:

“* These statements have not been approved by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent disease. Results may vary.”

In addition, this product contains psyllium seed husk, something I was cautioned to avoid. It seems my nephrologist is not the only one who feels this way. http://www.metamuciladvisor.com/avoid-psyllium-and-metamucil-in-kidney-disease/ is the webpage of Metamucil, a product whose main ingredient is psyllium.  However, this conscientious company also posts this information on their website:

Psyllium Products and Their Minerals

There are certain psyllium products that contain a large amount of minerals that individuals with kidney disease cannot process. Some psyllium products contain high volumes of psyllium seed huskspotassium, sodium and magnesium, which if a person with kidney disease consumes can cause a lot of problems. If an individual’s physician gives permission on taking psyllium then they need to make sure the psyllium product follows their restricted diet.

Fluids Required With Psyllium

When consuming psyllium six to eight glasses of water must be consumed to keep from having any uncomfortable side effects. This can be a problem for an individual with kidney disease since the kidneys cannot effectively filter the fluid. Since the proper amount of fluid cannot be consumed this can cause side effects and make the natural fiber less effective.

Things to Consider

One of the number one complaints in individuals with kidney disease is constipation due to the fact fluid restrictions, vegetables and more. Since there are many restrictions an individual has with kidney disease with their diet there are other safe options to choose from. Discuss these other safe options with your physician to relieve constipation.

Maybe it’s just me, but I don’t understand why someone with kidney disease would want to take a product that will harm them.  As a matter of fact, I don’t understand why Kibow, the makers of Renadyl, don’t post such a warning on their site. Hmmm, I wonder if the  “…safe, free of serious side effects, and effective in helping the body rid itself of harmful toxins when taken for as long as 6 months” statement included in their material IS their warning.  And just how many people catch that one sentence anyway?

At http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00760162, I did find the record of a study filed by Kibow in 2009, but not the results of the six month trial.  The record was processed on November 9, 2014 which is very recent.  Either I don’t know how to find the outcomes of the trial or they are simply not there. I suspect the latter.

I have no intention of vilifying Kibow, but do find this to be another case of be careful what you choose to take, very careful.  Watch the small print, talk to your nephrologist before making any decisions, and make sure you guard whatever you have left of your kidney function.

Book CoverThank you for your continued interest in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease. Keep in mind what a terrific holiday gift this is… and that next year, you’ll be able to gift the same person with What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease’s little sister: The Book of Blogs.

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

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