Let Them Eat Cake!

The_Book_of_Blogs-_M_Cover_for_KindleWe have still not finished celebrating my birthday.  Say, now that you’ve downloaded your free copy of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 as my gift to you on my birthday, why not share it for free for 14 days on the Kindle Book Lending program?

Another low cost way of getting the book is asking someone who bought the print copy from Amazon to buy the digital one for you via the Kindle MatchBook program for $2.99.  Of course, you can always ask your library to order a copy.  There are lots of low cost and free ways to get the book.

We were up in Flagstaff for two days as part of my birthday celebration.  Bear remembered that I had repeatedly expressed a desire to see Meteor Crater. Yep, I wanted to visit a hole in the ground for my birthday.

While we were there, we also visited Sunset Crater and learned the difference between eruption and meteor craters.  Going whole hog, we drove IMG_1030along to Wakupti and Wukoki to see the ruins of the pueblos there. This is an amazing state we live in.

We had to stay somewhere, so we stayed somewhere special.  The England House Bed & Breakfast was built about 1902, which made me feel right at home since I raised my daughters in an 1899 Victorian house on New York’s Staten Island.  Now, here’s where the renal part of our overnight get-away comes into play and why there’s a blog about it.  I know, I know… you thought I just wanted to share my birthday fun with you.

Well, that too, but the owner of the B & B – Laurel Dunn – asked if we had any eating restrictions.  Good question for renal patients; bad question for those cooking for them.  I told her. In detail. With examples.  And she came through.

While my husband enjoyed fruit soup, I had fresh cut melon, strawberries, and blueberries.  I had never heard of fruit soup before, so Laurel explained that it was fruit liquefied with yoghurt. Uh-oh, the dreaded yoghurt. That’s not recommended on my renal diet due to the phosphorous in it.

As a Chronic Kidney Disease Patient, my kidneys do not filter my blood as well as they were meant to.  Too much phosphorous can cause problems. I went to What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease {page 81} to remind myself what phosphorous does for us and why too much of it is not a good thing when you’re a CKD patient.

Book CoverI have to admit I didn’t know anything about phosphorous. This is the second most plentiful mineral in the body and works closely with the first, calcium. Together, they produce strong bones and teeth. 85% of the phosphorous and calcium in our bodies is stored in the bones and teeth.  The rest circulates in the blood except for about 5% that is in cells and tissues. Again, phosphorous is important for the kidneys since it filters out waste via them. Phosphorous balances and metabolizes other vitamins and minerals including vitamin D which is so important to CKD patients. As usual, it performs other functions, such as getting oxygen to tissues and changing protein, fat and carbohydrate into energy.

Be aware that kidney disease can cause excessive phosphorus. And what does that mean for Early Stage CKD patients? Not much if the phosphorous levels are kept low. Later, at Stages 4 and 5, bone problems including pain and breakage may be endured since excess phosphorous means the body tries to maintain balance by using the calcium that should be going to the bones. There are other consequences, but this is the one most easily understood.

But, of course, there was more to breakfast.  Bear enjoyed a lovely soufflé and muffins.  Bing, bing, bing. A soufflé has a custard base, in other words, a creamy base.  I think I’ve mentioned before that I’m also lactose intolerant.  I’ll say this, it certainly looked tasty.  So what did I have instead?  A simple vegan cheese omelet with four spears of asparagus cunningly arranged over it.

The night before, Laurel had opened her refrigerator to me so I could read the labels on different products.  One was the vegan cheese. It looked all right as far as my sodium, phosphorous, potassium, and protein restrictions, but I had never tasted it before. Let’s just say it’s probably an acquired taste.  My fault, not Laurel’s.

And the excruciatingly aromatic muffins that Richard, Laurel’s partner, baked?  Why did I pass them up? You guessed it.  It was the phosphorous again.  But I did not go away hungry.  Laurel and Richard provided cranberry/blueberry bread from The Wild Flower Baking Company. Apparently this is a specialty item since I could not find it on their website to pull up the ingredients.

Let’s put it this way: this bread was so good that I had it instead of the ugly blue cake I got for the family because I felt bad for it.  I let them {the IMG_1039family} eat cake, while I feasted on the bread.  At least that was the plan.  Once they tasted my bread, they clamored for it.  Ever see five grown children and a husband politely clamor?

But wait, there’s more.  Each juice Laurel had contained added sugar of some kind… except Ceres mango. It was not nectar, but juice sweetened with another juice – pear juice.  And it was delicious.  That became what I was going to have instead of ice cream at my birthday dinner.  Well, until everyone else tasted it.  You know the story.

You don’t think I let a breakfast go by without 1/2 of of my 16 ounces of coffee a day, do you?  It was superb, absolutely superb.

Add chicken cacciatore with brown rice that I made and was totally renal friendly and that, my friends, is how to enjoy your birthday get-away and your birthday dinner without breaking the renal diet.

IMG_1028As for exercise, ummm, well, it was too cold! No, really.  See, I’m even wearing a coat. I console myself with the fact that I got right on the exercise band wagon the very next day.  That’s okay, right?  It is, isn’t it?

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

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