Not Exactly

Before we start, I want to tell you I’ll be the guest on Online with Andrea tonight at http://www.blogtalkradio.com/onlinewith andrea/2015/03/23/chronic-kidney-disease in honor of National Kidney Month 7:30 EST.  This is a good opportunity to share aNational Kidney Monthwareness of our disease.

Kidney Book CoverYou may have friends, family, co-workers who are still not really sure what CKD is or why it’s important to be tested.  Here’s your chance to have someone else explain it for a change. I haven’t done a radio show in quite a while, but the timing was just too good to pass up this time around.

Now, what’s not exactly?  I’ve been thinking that knowing the definition of something is not the same as knowing whatever it is. {My English teacher senses are tingling right now.}  Specifically, I was thinking about pre-diabetes. We know that ‘pre’ is a prefix – talk about using a word, or in this case a part of a word, to define itself –a group of letters added before a word that changes its meaning. To further complicate this simple explanation, the prefix ‘pre’ means before. So pre-diabetes means before diabetes.

Wait a minute.  Aren’t we all pre-diabetes, or any other condition for that matter, before we actually develop it?  Well, yes.  Something is off here.  Ah, a synonym {The English teachers arises!  That’s a word that means the same as the word you can’t think of.  No, that’s a writer’s definition.  An English teacher will tell you they are words with the same meaning but different spellings and pronunciations.)

The synonym for pre-diabetes is borderline diabetes. That makes sense.  You’re just about there, but not quite.  That’s what my A1C results have blood glucosebeen saying for years.  Reminder: the A1C is the blood test that measures how well your body has been using your blood glucose for the past several months before you take the test.  Mine wasn’t doing so well.

We are CKD patients.  We know what diabetes can do to your kidneys and that diabetes is the number one cause of CKD. In case you’ve forgotten, this is from The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/diabetes for information.

With diabetes, the small blood vessels in the body are injured. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, your kidneys cannot clean your blood properly. Your body will retain more water and salt than it should, which can result in weight gain and ankle swelling. You may have protein in your urine. Also, waste materials will build up in your blood.

bladderDiabetes also may cause damage to nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder. The pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that has a high sugar level.

I’ve repeated this from last week’s blog because you need to understand diabetes so you can understand the importance of not letting your body develop it.

Now borderline diabetes. While WebMD calls that the former name for pre-diabetes, it also talks about insulin resistance at http://www.webmd.com/diabetes/guide/insulin-resistance-syndromeinsulin resistance Insulin is a hormone that controls your blood sugar levels. If you have insulin resistance, your body doesn’t respond as well as it should to the insulin it makes. That leaves your blood sugar levels higher than they should be. As a result, your pancreas has to make more insulin to manage your blood sugar.

What I’ve discovered is that sometimes even that extra insulin produced by the pancreas isn’t enough. The first line of treatment for borderline or pre-diabetes according to the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/prediabetes/basics/treatment/con-20024420 is

  • Eating healthy foods. Choose foods low in fat and calories and high in fiber. Focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Strive for variety to help you achieve your goals without compromising taste or nutrition. This type of diet may be referred to as a Mediterranean-style diet.
  • Getting more physical activity. Aim for 30 to 60 minutes of moderate physical activity most days of the week. Try not to let more than two blues dancersdays go by without some exercise. Take a brisk daily walk. Ride your bike. Swim laps. If you can’t fit in a long workout, break it up into smaller sessions spread throughout the day. The American Diabetes Association also recommends resistance training, such as weightlifting, twice a week.
  • Losing excess pounds. If you’re overweight, losing just 5 to 10 percent of your body weight — only 10 to 20 pounds (4.5 to 9 kilograms) if you weigh 200 pounds (91 kilograms) — can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To keep your weight in a healthy range, focus on permanent changes to your eating and exercise habits. Motivate yourself by remembering the benefits of losing weight, such as a healthier heart, more energy and improved self-esteem.

Book CoverPart 2

And then there are the folks like me. Despite a hard won nine pound weight loss, daily physical activity, and a renal healthy diet (Hey, I have Chronic Kidney Disease and have had it for the last seven years!), my body still is insulin resistant. That means medication.

I started out on 500 mg. Metformin daily.  This is controversial for kidney patients since there is a school of thought saying it can harm the kidneys.  That meant lots of discussion with my nephrologist, although my primary care doctor prescribed the drug.  The nephrologist felt that 500 mg. once a day would not harm the kidneys I’ve kept at stage 3 CKD since my diagnose.Metformin

What we hadn’t figured on was the stomach upset, nausea, and lightheadedness I’d feel.  I was at the point of immediately locating the waste paper baskets in any room I entered – just in case, you understand – when my PCP and I decided to halve the dose.  Things are still better as far as blood glucose and sort of getting there as far as the side effects.

This is all new to me.  As with anything else new, it’s foreign right now. But it’s important to me to protect that kidney function so I know I’ll figure out how to deal with the insulin resistance more effectively and soon.  Yet, I’m awfully thankful I also have nutritional counseling once a week for at least two months.

Until next week,Digital Cover Part 1

Keep living your life!

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