This Shouldn’t Hurt

Today is our second wedding anniversary, so I took a picture of me in my wedding dress.  While it is a one of a kind, handmade dress, it was far too2 year anniversary small when I bought it.  No problem, I figured.  I’ll just wear those slimming garments underneath.

That worked.  But I think they’re really torture garments. This year, after two years of exercising, renal dieting, and the new addition of high blood sugar dieting (oh, and blissful marriage), I was able to wear the dress without the torture garments.

What’s my point, you ask.  Simply, that there is hope, that exercise and following the correct diet for your health do pay off.  Since I only wear my wedding dress once a year on our anniversary, I got the chance to really see the difference in my body since last year…and, for once, I was pleased.

You know what pleases me. Now here’s what displeases me.  I didn’t know that lancets for testing blood glucose come in sizes.  Actually, I would have laughed had you told me that before I needed them and made some lewd comparison to a personal product that also comes in sizes.

I was working blind.  Now that my informative diabetes counselor told me about ultra-thin lancets, I’m a bit more comfortable sticking myself with them several times a day. But that doesn’t mean I understand the whole deal.  So today’s blog is pretty much about the mechanics of testing your own blood.

As usual, let’s start at the beginning.  Lancet is defined by The Medical Dictionary at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/lancet as

A surgical knife with a short, wide, pointed double-edged blade, used especially for making punctures and small incisions.

lancetsMine is a little different since it has a cylindrical stem with a detachable, disposable cap.  Under the cap is a sharp, needle looking device that is what pierces my skin. The first few days I used one, I cried. It hurt. Bear was not going to put up with that and went to the pharmacy to find something better for me.  No one had told me these little guys came in ‘ultra-thin.’ I gather my PCP thought my pharmacist would tell me and my pharmacist thought my PCP told me.  Wrong on both accounts.

So, what are the mechanics that allowed the ultra-thin lancets to hurt less than the regular (for lack of a better word)? According to Diabetics Answers at http://diabetes.answers.com/management/blood-glucose-monitoring-how-to-test-your-blood-sugar-at-home

Blood sugar is tested by obtaining a very small blood sample from tiny capillaries under the skin. You do not use a vein to obtain the blood sample. The test is sometimes referred to as a finger stick because the sample is most often obtained from the fingertip with the help of a lancet.

In other words, you’re not creating a deep puncture at all.  That also explains why I can use the ultra-thin lancets; you only need a small drop of blood from the capillaries just under the skin.  Because I can use these, however, doesn’t mean you can.  Each of us is different. The MedSupplyGuide at http://www.themedsupplyguide.com/lancets/ tells us

The higher the gauge, the smaller the perforation the lancet makes. Usually a higher-gauge lancet is less painful to use, but it may be harder to get an adequate amount of blood with a higher-gauge lancet.layers of skin

Okay then, if you can’t get enough blood for the testing with the higher gauge lancet, you’ve got to experiment with lower gauges until you find the right one for you. The lower gauge hurt more for me, but that could be because I didn’t know about the lancet device.

While I was no longer crying with each prick, I was still tearing up.  My loving husband (You don’t need one of these; you can go to the pharmacy yourself which is what I was going to do before he beat me to it.) still wasn’t pleased with my everyday experience, so back to the pharmacy he went and discovered the lancet device. I can only imagine I wasn’t told about this for the same reason I didn’t know about ultra-thin lancets: miscommunication.

lancet devicesThese, my friends, are just plain wonderful. I went to Diabetic Live at https://www.diabeticlive.com/diabetes-101/how-to-use-a-lancet-and-lancing-device/ for help in explaining this one.

This instrument has a spring inside those {sic} forces the lancet to prick or make an incision on your finger. Then it draws back quickly. With a lancing device, you can change how deep or shallow you want the incision to be. Depending on what measurement you choose, it can alleviate additional pain and discomfort.

No more crying; no more tearing up, just the prick I was told I would feel.  Mine has depth settings from 1 to 5.  I’m still on 1 which is the shallowest piercing.  As my device ages and the spring wears out, I may have to use a higher setting to pierce at the same depth.

When you think about it, this is really simple. But who thinks about it if you don’t have to?  For the last month, since I’ve started treatment for the high blood glucose, I have felt like I was in a foreign land and didn’t know the customs. I’m still learning, but am so much more comfortable with the physical part of it.t-shirt

Aha! Talk about being physical… you are joining us for the Kidney Walk in Phoenix, aren’t you?  It’s at Chase Stadium on Sunday,tshirt pix the 19th and you can register there from 7:30 in the morning.  Or, if you’re like me and don’t like to wait for the last minute, you can register early by going to Kidneywalk.kintera.org.  We’re Team SlowItDownCKD.  Can’t make it but want to support us?  You can donate at the same address.  Above are the pictures of the t-shirt I’ve been promising.

Digital Cover Part 1

Many thanks if you wrote reviews for The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 and The Book of Blogs: Part 2Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. I am asking for an anniversary present: please write a review.  Some people mentioned they don’t want their name posted anywhere; well, you can use a nickname or post a review anonymously.

Until next week,Book Cover

Keep living your life!

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