Water, Water Everywhere

11194487_10206480685479477_4614482644786730988_oYesterday was Mother’s Day here in the U.S.  Here’s what I posted on that day:

When I grew up, mothers were all married women. Not anymore! Happy Mother’s Day to the moms who are moms in a lesbian relationship, the dads who are moms in a gay relationship, the single dads who are both mother and father, the moms in straight relationships, the older siblings bringing up their brothers and sisters, the single moms and those who have lost their child. You’re all still mothers and I relish enjoying this day with you.

I hope yours was a very happy one, even if your children are far away like my Nima who is in New York. Nima

This mother (two biological daughters, two step-daughters, two significant others) has been writing about sea sickness remedies, both medical and natural, for the past two weeks.  That got me to thinking about another kind of water and why we need it.

I’ve mentioned that I see a nutritional counselor to help me prevent my pre-diabetes from becoming diabetes. We all know I need 64 oz. of fluid intake a day as a Chronic Kidney Disease patient, but it’s not all water.  There’s my beloved 16 ounces – or two cups – of coffee a day plus any solid that turns to a liquid when melted (think ices) and the liquid in fruits such as watermelon.  By the way, did you know that our bodies are 50-75% water depending upon our health and age?diabetes equipment

Debbie, my nutritional counselor, kept hitting the need to hydrate.  Until she realized I already take this into account daily, she asked me to keep count of the number of eight ounce glass of water I drank each day.  That’s how important she felt it was.  We know that; we’re CKD patients.

But, have you ever wondered why it’s so important that we keep hydrated?  That’s one of those questions that was answered when I was first diagnosed, but – being who I am – I don’t remember the answer.  And that got me to wondering if you did.

The most obvious answer is that we need water so that our metabolism can function at its best. This is important so we have energy and build new cell materials. Let’s explore this a bit more.

The Oxford Dictionary defines catabolism (love that name) as

the breakdown of complex molecules in living organisms to form simpler ones, together with the release of energy; destructive metabolism.

In this case, ‘destructive’ is a positive.  No destruction of complex molecules = no release of energy.  Heaven knows we already have enough problems with energy as CKDers.

I used the Medical-Dictionary at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/anabolism for an explanation of anabolism.

The phase of metabolism in which simple substances are synthesized into the complex materials of living tissue.

So catabolism is the function of metabolism which breaks down complex molecules for energy and anabolism is the function that builds up cell material.metabolism

Oh, almost forgot – metabolism simply means change. How can I remember a college etymology lesson from fifty years ago, but not remember what my nephrologist told me seven years ago????

All right, but why the need to hydrate? While a commercial site, Nestle Waters at http://www.nestle-waters.com/healthy-hydration/water-fonctions-in-human-body (I did wonder about that ‘o’ in fonctions.) lists the five reasons we need water.  Notice number five and remember that toxins need to be eliminated, too.  That’s the job of the kidneys… and they need water to do it.water to cells

  1. Cell life
  2. Chemical and metabolic reactions
  3. Transport of nutrients
  4. Body temperature regulation
  5. Elimination of waste

As I researched, I hit medical sites, sports sites, pregnancy sites, elder care sites, and even pediatric sites.  All included hydration in their how-to-stay-healthy advice.

As CKDers, we know that an excess of sodium, phosphorous, potassium, and protein is not good for us.  Guess what flushes out the excess.  That’s right.  Your kidneys filter it from your blood, it’s converted to urine, and leaves your system.  Of course, you don’t want to overtax your already compromised nephrons by going over your daily limits of each of the above.

We’ll pause for a moment here while you go get a drink of water.

409px-Glass-of-waterRefreshed?  Okay.

Did you know there are different types of water? Many thanks to Consumer Reports for the following chart.

Artesian

Water obtained from a well that taps a confined aquifer, an underground layer of rock or sand that contains water. Example: Fiji Natural Artesian Water.

Distilled

Water that has been boiled and then recondensed from the steam that the boiling produces. Distillation kills microbes and removes minerals, giving water a flat taste. Example: Glacéau Smartwater.

Mineral

Groundwater that naturally contains at least 250 parts per million of dissolved solids. All minerals and other trace elements must be present in the water when it emerges at the source. Example: Calistoga.

P.W.S.

Public water source, also known as municipal water supply, or tap water. Fun fact: Aquafina, one of the top 10 selling domestic brands, used to say “P.W.S.” on its label—but changed that in 2007 under pressure from Corporate Accountability International to make clear that the water came from a public supply and not some pristine mountain spring called P.W.S.

Purified

Water from any source that has been treated to remove chemicals and pathogens according to standards set by the U.S. Pharmacopoeia. Must contain no more than 10 parts per million of dissolved solids. Distillation, deionization, and reverse osmosis are all purification methods. Examples: Aquafina, Dasani. (Note from me: recently, Dasani has started added minerals to their water.)

Sparklingbottled water

Water that contains carbon dioxide at an amount equal to what it contained when it emerged from its source. Carbon dioxide lost during the treatment process may be added back. (Carbonated waters such as soda water and seltzer are considered soft drinks, not bottled waters.) Example: Perrier.

Spring

Water derived from an underground formation from which water flows naturally to the Earth’s surface. Spring water must be collected at the spring or through a borehole tapping the underground formation (aquifer) feeding the spring. Examples: Arrowhead Mountain Spring Water (Nestlé), Evian. (Hmmm, Nestle also has minerals added now.)

I stick to either spring water or osmosis filtered water.  Be wary of any water with minerals added. You don’t really need more of those.

Digital Cover Part 1

 

Book Cover

It’s contest time.  Post a picture of you reading any of my three books in the most unusual place you can think of and win a copy of Part 2The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1.  You can post your pictures at https://www.facebook.com/WhatHowearlyCKD which is SlowItDownCKD’s Facebook page.  Make sure the title and your face are clearly visible. Keep it clean and keep them coming!  The contest ends on May 31.  Thank you to inspired reader, Geo De Angelo, for sparking the idea in my mind. I’m eager to see how creative you can get.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

Advertisements

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://gailraegarwood.wordpress.com/2015/05/11/water-water-everywhere/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Thank you for your article of “different waters”. I have a hard time with tap water! I think it is full of micro-organisms and all sorts of germs that I am swallowing…..I know it’s a stupid, funny phobia, but, it’s true! Your weird friend, Cindy

    • I can’t agree with you, Cindy. If you’ve ‘got a feeling,’I say go with it. I’ll bet if you researched the tap water in your area, you’d find that is exactly what’s in it. Glad to be of service!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: