Going Mental

Ilana Contest Winner!  Congratulations to Ilana Lydia for winning the photo contest for the Weirdest Place to read one of my CKD books.  She took a little poetic license and had her cat read the digital version on her computer.  I never would have thought of that… or my Bear’s reading one of the books while welding or Abby’s reading one while walking the tightrope and twirling a hoola hoop.  (They were disqualified because they’re immediate family.)

Thanks for all the entries, you creative readers, you. Ilana, please contact me privately so I can send you a brand new, personally inscribed copy of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1.  If any of you have a contest idea you’d like to have me run, just let me know.  This contest idea was from avid reader, Geo DeAngelo.  Thanks again, Geo.DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Aha, looks like there’s a free Path to Wellness health screening coming up. This one is in Mesa, Arizona, at Adelante Healthcare 1705 W. Main St. on the 20th from 8 to 1:30. That’s a Saturday. There are two requisites here: you must be over 18 and have a nuclear family member with diabetes, heart disease, or kidney disease OR a history of diabetes or high blood pressure yourself.

Path to Wellness screenings include the screening itself, immediate blood and urine results, doctor consult, onsite health education, 6 week Healthy Living Workshops, and help finding a family doctor.  Just call the National Kidney Foundation of Arizona for an appointment at 602 840 1644 for English speakers or 602 845 7905 for those who would prefer Spanish.NKF-logo_Hori_OB

Have I mentioned enough times that this screening is free?  Early diagnose is important so you can slow down the progression of the disease. You can’t be treated for the disease if you don’t know you have it.  Now you’ve just lost the ‘I don’t have the money for that’ excuse.  Be good to yourself and get screened.

Now, about that blog title.  You know when you have a preconceived notion that you seem to make things come out that way?  Okay, we all go for periodic blood tests.  The procedure is called venipuncture which simply means puncturing the vein. Since I’m on a cholesterol medication, it’s once every three months for me.  I went for the blood draw on Friday.

There are two phlebotomists at the Lab Corp attached to my PCP’s practice.  One is so heavy handed that it hurts and I have discreetly requested that 1. She not draw my blood and 2. She be told why I made that request.  It turns out this was not news to her, yet she continues to work there. She was not the problem this time.Abby book

The other phlebotomist has the touch of a butterfly and a great deal of personality to boot.  I know if she draws my blood, it’s not going to hurt. My veins are also becoming ‘difficult’ after all these years of blood tests.  They roll, collapse, or seemingly disappear. I just realized these problems are all associated with elderly patients.  Hey, I’m not there yet! Truthfully, some of these problems may have to do with the placement and depth of the needle. If you’re interested, there’s a fairly easy to understand ARO Onsite Training and Consulting (for phlebotomists) site at blood drawhttp://arotraining.com/images/Documents/Venipuncture%20Module%206_Venipuncture%20Complications%20and%20Special%20Circumstances.pdf

Finally, we get to the mental part.  While I knew the preferred phlebotomist wasn’t going to make me hurt – other than the initial pinch – it did hurt. I just didn’t experience the sensation that way. I have a close to the surface vein in my upper left arm and, after palpating but not finding a really good vein in the crooks of either of my elbows or the back of my hands, she decided to use that one… with my blessing.  I’d been wondering why no one ever tried that vein before. Note the size of the bruise this resulted in:IMG_1220

It worked for 1 ½ of the 3 tubes that were needed, then it collapsed.  She knew I’d have a whopping bruise, but I still didn’t feel the pain I should have been feeling according to my past experience of venipuncture and hers.  Why?

Ah, the brain is a marvelous thing. According to About Health at http://pain.about.com/od/whatischronicpain/a/feeling_pain.htm

Special pain receptors called nociceptors activate whenever there has been an injury, or even a potential injury, such as breaking the skin or Bear and bookcausing a large indentation.

Venipuncture, although it is to help keep you healthy, is an injury to the skin and vein.  So have I somehow been manipulating my nociceptors? No, I don’t think so.

There are many sites on the internet that explain how you can use visualization, transference, mental imagery, meditation, and other such techniques to lessen chronic pain. That’s not what I was dealing with. I knew, absolutely knew, I wasn’t going to experience any pain. I usually do some deep breathing, do not look at the site being punctured (wrote a whole blog about that a few years ago), and cracked jokes with the young lady performing the procedure.

In other words, there was no anxiety, no fear, no foreboding, just a simple case of I-have-to-do-this-therefore-I-will-and- I-will-experience-the-pain-as-mildly-annoying. I know. I know. I wish I could do this at the dentist’s office, too.

brainI had expected to offer you loads of scientific information about this from alternative medicine sites, but they all seem to say the same thing I just did.  Over 40 years ago, I was involved with Seagull Mind Training. That was a company (now defunct) that claimed to teach you how to use more of your brain power. I say we are using more, all of us, with the quest into mind/body connection, alternative and complementary medicine, and an overall awareness of our general good health. The difference is that we now accept this as commonplace.

While this is not something I would try with major surgery, you might be surprised at how well it works during your next blood draw.

Poor books seem to get ignored until the very end of my posts lately.  I urge you to share, people, share. If you’ve bought the Kindle version, there is a share program available. You can also ask your library to order copies.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!Digital Cover Part 2 redone - CopyWhat is it

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