It’s Still There

I’ve gotten more questions this week about more different areas of health when you have Chronic Kidney Disease than I’ve gotten in a long time.  DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILBefore we start on the one that will be answered today, I have a question for you.

Will you please post a review of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 or Part 2 (or both) on Amazon?  My sales reports tell me they’re being sold, but I don’t see any reviews.  If we’re going to keep spreading awareness of CKD, we’re going to need these Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copyreviews.

A number of people – including my primary care physician – were shocked by the large bruise caused by last week’s partially successful venipuncture. She, of course, knew what happened after I told her how I got it, but many of my readers didn’t.  I’m not so sure I did, either. Nor did I know why it was taking so long to heal.

According to the New York Blood Center at http://nybloodcenter.org/media/filer_public/2013/05/03/bruising06.pdf

Bruising is caused by bleeding under the skin. For example, a hard knock that does not break the skin can damage fragile blood vessels that lie just beneath. These damaged blood vessels leak a small amount of blood, which collects in the area as a bruise. With time, the familiar blue-black discoloration changes to yellow and can move up and down the arm but eventually fades and disappears.

I’m beginning to wonder just how much time. Although, there was evidently a lot of under the skin bleeding happening here.IMG_1226

I remembered using brighthub some time ago and thought I would see what they had to say about this sometimes painful bruise. This is what I found at http://www.brighthub.com/science/medical/articles/92029.aspx

One cause of pain is a hematoma. A hematoma is a collection of blood that forms outside the vein. During a blood draw when the needle pierces the vein, it can become temporarily damaged causing blood to leak out into the tissue. The leaked blood forms a pocket of blood, which can be painful. It’s not uncommon for the area around a hematoma to turn red or blue, and the surrounding tissue to become swollen.

Fortunately, the body gradually reabsorbs the displaced blood cells, and the hematoma slowly resolves – although it can look pretty ugly in the meantime. A hematoma is quite easy to see and is a very visible cause of pain in the arm days after a blood test. Doctors usually recommend that people treat hematomas by applying ice packs, elevating the arm, and taking anti-inflammatory medications for the pain. Hematomas usually resolve in five to seven days.

ice packIce packs? No one said anything about that. Elevation? No mention of that, either. As for anti-inflammatories, I have to admit I wouldn’t have taken one even if it had been suggested.  Five to seven days, huh? I’m now on day ten and first starting to see a hint of yellow. Well, the site did say “usually.”

I wanted more on the treatment of bruising so I went to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/guide/bruises-article?print=true

A cold compress such as an ice pack or a bag of frozen vegetables should be applied to the affected area for 20-30 minutes in order to speed healing and reduce swelling. Do not apply ice directly to the skin. Wrap the ice pack in a towel.

If the bruise takes up a large area of the leg or foot, the leg should be kept elevated as much as possible during the first 24 hours after the injury.

Acetaminophen (This is me here.  Acetaminophen is not a NSAID and may be taken by CKD patients.) may be taken for pain as instructed on the bottle. Avoid aspirin or ibuprofen because they slow the blood from clotting and may, in fact, prolong the bleeding.

After about 48 hours, heat in the form of a warm washcloth applied to the bruise for 10 minutes or so two to three times a day may increase blood flow to the bruised area, allowing the skin to reabsorb the blood more quickly. Ultimately, the bruise will fade in color.

Funny, Bear took a look at my arm just this morning and suggested the heat, too.  I guess the man knows what he’s talking about.Bruising-Injectables-Botulinum-Toxin-Fillers

Have you ever wondered why veins, rather than arteries, are used for a blood draw? Or am I the only one who ever considered the question? I got my answer from the same site that was so helpful last week: Arotraining. The site address is http://arotraining.com/images/Documents/Venipuncture%20Module%201_Anatomy%20of%20the%20Arm%20and%20Vein%20Location.pdf

(My computer keeps trying to correct the British English spellings, but this is a British site.)

Arteries are:

  • Located deeper in the body to protect against haemorrhage.
  • Muscular, to withstand heavy pumping and therefore more difficult to puncture.
  • Supplied with abundant nerve fibres; therefore, arterial puncture tends to be more painful.
  • At risk of extended bleeding after puncture because blood flowing through is under great pressure.

Veins are:arteries_and_veins_of_the_arm_l

  • Generally located closer to the surface in the extremities and are easier to locate
  • Easier to puncture than arteries because vein layers contain less tissue
  • Supplied with fewer nerve fibres than arteries; therefore venipuncture is less painful.
  • Under less pressure so it is easier to stop bleeding after puncture

I hope this helped.  It certainly helped me understand what happened.

I am missing the excitement of a contest.  Since the name of my game is CKD awareness, I propose you send me a comment naming your favorite CKD book and why it’s your favorite.  You can keep it to a paragraph or two.  Notice, I did not write which one of MY CKD books is your favorite. You’ll be introducing us to books we may not be aware of and I will gladly compile the entries into a reading list for all of us.  Digital will be included. Let’s run this baby for a week. The prize? Why a print copy of The Book of Blogs: Part 1, of course.

Don’t forget about free Path to Wellness health screening coming up. This one is in Mesa, Arizona, at Adelante Healthcare 1705 W. Main St. on the 20th from 8 to 1:30 on Saturday, June 20th.What is it

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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