We Are Not Alone, Unfortunately

I have a friend who keeps telling me that Chronic Kidney Disease is not as widespread as I think it is and that I should stop scaring people by telling them it is. My usual way is to present facts, but not argue. In this case, I found myself arguing which made me wonder if I could be wrong.  Why protest so vehemently if I were sure I was right?

And that’s what today’s blog is about. First, you should know this has nothing to do with whether my friend is right, or if I am. It’s bigger than that… a lot bigger.

How big? Well, let’s start with the United States of America.  This diagram is from The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at http://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/Pages/kidney-disease-statistics-united-states.aspx.

ckd

I don’t want to scare you too, but 2008 was seven years ago.  How much more has the incidence of new CKD cases risen since then?  Notice it’s the over 65 population with the dramatic rise in new cases. That’s my age group.  Maybe it’s yours, too.

[Reminder from the glossary of What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: Medicare is the U.S. government health insurance for those over 65, those having certain special needs, or those who have end stage renal disease.]

This next bit of information is from the American Kidney Fund at http://www.kidneyfund.org/about-us/assets/pdfs/akf-kidneydiseasestatistics-2012.pdf and shows us the numbers for 2012.  That’s getting closer to today, but it’s still three years ago.

Kidney disease is the 8th leading cause of death in the United States.

An estimated 31 million people in the United States (10% of the population) have chronic kidney disease (CKD).

9 out of 10 people who have stage 3 CKD (moderately decreased kidney function) do not know it.kidney interior

CKD is more common among women, but men with CKD are 50 more likely than women to progress to kidney failure (also called end-stage renal disease or ESRD)

Some racial and ethnic groups are at greater risk for kidney failure. Relative to whites, the risk for African Americans is 3.8 times higher, Native Americans is 2 times higher, Asians is 1.3 times higher, and Hispanics also have increased risk, relative to non-Hispanics.

I was diagnosed at stage 3, age 60, and had never heard of CKD before. This chart from the National Kidney Fund at www.kidney.org demonstrates the stages. The numbers outside the half circle represent the percentage of kidney function at each stage.

stages of CKD

That means I was one of the 9 out of 10 people who had stage 3 CKD and didn’t know it, even though I was a woman over 50 (actually, well over 50). Talk about being blind-sided!

What is itTime for another reminder – from my first book again: CKD is damage to the kidneys for more than three months, which cannot be reversed but may be slowed.

Imagine being told you had an incurable disease.  What would your first thought be?  Mine was bizarre. I told the nephrologist that my daughter was getting married.  What I didn’t tell him because I was so shocked at this diagnose is that I thought it meant I was going to die very soon, but I couldn’t allow that because I wanted to be at her wedding.

By the way, that’s where my CKD Awareness activism comes from. I didn’t want any of us to think we were under threat of imminent death once we were diagnosed.  I’d rather explain how to get tested (Eighth leading cause of death in the U.S.) and – #SlowItDownCKD – slow down the progression of the decline of your kidney function.

Let’s take a look at over countries.  This is from Kidney Health Australia as of May this year at http://www.kidney.org.au/kidneydisease/fastfactsonckd/tabid/589/default.aspx

HOW MANY PEOPLE HAVE CKD?

  • Approximately 1.7 million Australians (1 in 10) aged 18 years and over have indicators of CKD such as reduced kidney function and/or the presence of albumin in the urine.
  • Less than 10% of the people with CKD are aware they have this condition.
  • This means over 1.5 million Australians are unaware they have indicators of CKD.

Unhealthy%20KidneyWHO IS AT INCREASED RISK OF CKD?

  • 1 in 3 Australians is at an increased risk of developing CKD.
  • Adult Australians are at an increased risk of CKD if they:
    • have diabetes
    • have high blood pressure
    • have established heart problems (heart failure or heart attack) and/or have had a stroke
    • have a family history of kidney disease
    • are obese (Body Mass Index BMI – more than or equal to 30)
    • are a smoker
    • are 60 years or older
    • are of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin

Notice their statistics are similar to ours, but there are two more are higher risk groups.

IMG_1398

“In 2013, nearly one million people died from chronic kidney disease. While this represents less than 2 percent of all deaths globally, it is a 135 percent increase from the number of chronic kidney disease-related deaths in 1990.

While the global increase in chronic kidney disease-related deaths is driven in part by people living to older ages, there is no scientific consensus on what is making this increasingly prominent among younger adults, with a near doubling of chronic kidney disease-related deaths among people ages 15 to 49 since 1990.”

The quote above is from Humanosphere at http://www.humanosphere.org/science/2015/01/visualizing-the-rise-of-chronic-kidney-disease-worldwide/ and is related to The Global Burden of Disease Study.

So you see, we are not alone.  Nor are we living under a death sentence. We can spread awareness of Chronic Kidney Disease and educate those diagnosed as to how to slow down the progression of the disease.

Kidney ArizonaTalking (I know, I know, writing) about this, The National Kidney Fund of Arizona will be holding a Path to Wellness screening on Saturday, September 19, 2015 at the Indo American Cultural Center. This includes free blood and urine testing, which is evaluated onsite using point-of-care testing devices to assess for the risk of diabetes, heart and kidney diseases. Those screened are also presented with chronic disease management education, an overall health assessment (weight, blood pressure, etc.) and a one-on-one consultation with a physician. Enrollment opportunities are offered for a follow-up 6-week series of Healthy Living workshops that teach chronic disease self-management skills.

Oh, one last thing. Have you heard about P2P’s Chronic Illness Buy & Sell page on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/P2PBuy.Sell/ ? It will be the place to go for anything chronic illness related. My first book is advertised there and both The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease books will be soon, too.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Really appreciated the last couple of posts Gail. Very good.

    >

    • It’s comments like yours, Suzanne, that help me feeling like I’m contributing.


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