Clogged Up?

That’s a good question and one I received from a reader just recently. Only this time, it doesn’t have to do with your nose or chest during a cold or the flu, but rather with cholesterol in your blood vessels.

For some of us, this is basic information, but for others… well, let’s just say we never bothered to find out about our cholesterol. After all, our doctors were managing this for us, weren’t they?

Ehhh, not my way. I like to be fully informed about what’s happening inside my body where I can’t see it. Let’s make that ‘especially where I can’t see it.’

What is itLet’s start with the basics from What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Early Disease.  This is the definition of cholesterol offered there:

While the basis for both sex hormones and bile, can cause blockages if it accumulates in the lining of a blood vessel.

If that doesn’t ring a bell, here’s the definition of Dyslipidemia:

Abnormal levels of cholesterol, triglyceride or both

Now we know there’s a normal and an abnormal level of cholesterol and that can’t be good.  So? Is that a big deal?

It is if you have Chronic Kidney Disease.  Dr. Joseph Vassalotti of The National Kidney Foundation explained it to reporter Jane Brody in an interview which is included in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1.DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAIL

Good  control  of  blood  sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol levels and body weight can delay the loss of kidney function.

I repeat, “…can delay the loss of kidney function.” That has been your ultimate goal since you were diagnosed, hasn’t it?

You may become confused by the three different kinds of cholesterol readings when you see the results of your blood tests.  I know I was, so I researched them and then wrote about them in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2.

Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy HDL is High Density Lipoprotein, the cholesterol that keeps your arteries clear or – as it’s commonly called – the good cholesterol.  VDL is Low Density Lipoprotein or the ‘bad’ kind that can clog your arteries. VLDL is Very Low Density Lipoprotein and one of the bad guys, too. It contains more triglycerides than protein and is big on clogging those arteries.

Wait a minute. Where did triglycerides come into this? According to the Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-cholesterol/in-depth/triglycerides/ART-20048186

Triglycerides and cholesterol are separate types of lipids that circulate in your blood. Triglycerides store unused calories and provide your body with energy, and cholesterol is used to build cells and certain hormones. Because triglycerides and cholesterol can’t dissolve in blood, they circulate throughout your body with the help of proteins that transport the lipids (lipoproteins).

Still with me?  Good, because you can do something about this.

cholestero

Sometimes, it’s as simple as lifestyle changes like adjusting your diet. While I don’t agree with all of this advice, DaVita at http://www.davita.com/kidney-disease/diet-and-nutrition/diet-basics/lowering-cholesterol-with-chronic-kidney-disease/e/5304 can get you started.

  •  Avoid foods high in saturated fat and cholesterol such as whole milk, cheese and fat from meat.
  • Bake, grill, broil and roast your poultry, fish and meat. Choose lean cuts of meat and trim off any fat.
  • Eggs are an excellent source of protein, but the yolks are high in cholesterol. Try egg substitutes like Egg Beaters® or Scramblers®, or substitute two egg whites for a whole egg.
  • Eat at least two servings of fish every week. Salmon, tuna, herring and trout contain good amounts of omega-3 fatty acids that lower your risk of heart disease.
  • Try spreads like Benecol® or Take Control® in place of butter or margarine. Plant sterols and stanols in these spreads help lower cholesterol levels.
  • Choose oils that are high in mono- and polyunsaturated fats: canola, olive, peanut, corn, safflower, soybean and sunflower.
  • Read food labels and try to eliminate foods with trans-fats (found in hydrogenated oils, margarine and many commercially prepared snack foods).
  • Eat kidney-friendly fruits and vegetables.water melon

Of course, if you’re diabetic or prediabetic, you need to modify these suggestions for your diet.  Last week’s blog may help with that.

Exercise will help, too. This is from Everyday Health at http://www.everydayhealth.com/high-cholesterol/fitness-and-cholesterol.aspx   and will give you an idea of how to start… just in case exercise is not in your vocabulary at this time.

       Try these exercise options to help shed pounds and manage high cholesterol:

  • Walking
  • Jogging or running
  • Swimming
  • Taking an aerobics class
  • Biking
  • Playing tennis, basketball, or other sports
  • Using weight machines or lifting free weights to build muscle tone

water walkingPlay around with the list. For example, I am not a water person and simply will not swim, although I’ve been known to water walk at the drop of a hat.  I love to walk and do as much as I can whenever I can.  Of course this is not a complete list.  Consider it a nudge to get started.

If life style changes don’t work for you, your doctor may prescribe a statin.  The Merriam-Webster Dictionary at http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/statin defines this as

 any of a group of drugs (as lovastatin and simvastatin) that inhibit the synthesis of cholesterol and promote the production of LDL-binding receptors in the liver resulting in a usually marked decrease in the level of LDL and a modest increase in the level of HDL circulating in blood plasma

There are substantial arguments against taking statins, but there are also substantial arguments for taking them.  This is something you have to discuss with your doctors since you have a unique medical condition. Is the risk of kidney failure or heart attack so great that you need the drug?  You might want to consider it then. But if it is being prescribed because “That’s protocol,” I would urge a serious heart to heart (good choice of words here) with the prescribing doctor or maybe even a second opinion.

4wedding

I hope you’ve enjoyed your cholesterol primer while I’m on my second attempt at a delayed honeymoon and busily avoiding all those goodies that are just plain bad for my cholesterol levels.

Until next week,

Enjoy your life!

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