Well, What About Mexico?

Last week, I was telling you about Chronic Kidney Disease in the ports of call on our delayed (but finally arrived) honeymoon, which turned out to be a family honeymoon. But then, I ran out of room to talk about Mexico and promised to do so next week. So, as in the punchline of an off color joke my dad used to tell, “Here t’is.”cozumel

Unless you’re a scuba diver like my step-daughter and her sweetheart or a partying young’un, you may have not been to Cozumel. It’s a small part of the country on the East Coast and – again – we were warned not to get off the bus unless we were told to. It’s also where we got to see some of the Mayan ruins and learn about the culture, as well as take a side trip to a cacao factory.  That smelled so good! The rest for us was some really beautiful scenery from the bus windows and an overwhelming shopping area at port.

I‘ve been to San Miguel de Allende, in Guanajuato State, for a writers’ conference and met both American and Canadian ex-patriates there as well as those that winter in the relative warmth there.  No one said it’s not safe. No one said stay on the bus or within the compound…and I got to meet the natives, too. What a lovely, warm people.

I’ve been to Ensenada decades ago and marveled at how uncommercialized it was.  Of course, I don’t know if it’s still like that. I only have my memories there. I also vague memories of visiting different areas in Mexico long ago, but vague is the operant word here.stages of CKD

Never once did I think about Chronic Kidney Disease treatment while I was there until this last time. Heck, I didn’t even know what CKD was much less that it could be treated.

So, what about Mexico? It would make sense to deal with the most shocking news first.  This is from National Public Radio in April of last year.  You can read more about the various theories as to what caused the vast number of deaths at http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2014/04/30/306907097/mysterious-kidney-disease-slays-farmworkers-in-central-america

nprThis form of kidney failure, known as insuficiencia renal cronica in Spanish (or chronic kidney disease of unknown origin in English), is now found from southern Mexico to Panama, Turcios-Ruiz says. But it occurs only along the Pacific coast.

The disease is killing relatively young men, sometimes while they’re still in their early 20s. Researchers at Boston University have attributed about 20,000 deaths to this form of kidney failure over the past two decades in Central America.

(More recent reports have suggested it was severe dehydration that caused CKD in these young men.)

This is from a 2010 report published in the National Institutes of Health PubMed at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20186176

In KEEP México City, CKD prevalence was higher than the overall prevalence among participants with diabetes (38%) or diabetes and hypertension (42%). Most KEEP México participants were unaware of the CKD diagnosis, despite that 71% in KEEP México City had seen a doctor in the previous year. CKD is highly prevalent, underdiagnosed, and underrecognized among high-risk individuals in México. KEEP is an effective screening program that can successfully be adapted for use in México.

Just in case you’ve forgotten, KEEP is The National Kidney Foundation’s Kidney Early Evaluation Program.K.E.E.P.

As you can probably tell, current information is not that readily available. But I didn’t give up.

I found an abstract at ResearchGate that demonstrated that the homeless in Jalisco State (on the Western Coast and the home of many Mexican traditions) had a higher incidence than the poor for undiagnosed hypertension and diabetes in 2007. You can look at the exact numbers in this small study at http://www.researchgate.net/publication/260208642_Chronic_kidney_disease_in_homeless_persons_in_Mexico

Finally, something more recent! Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research offered this information in their March 6, 2015 online issue.

BraziiIn Mexico, CKD prevalence among the poor is two-to three-fold higher than the general population, and the etiology is unknown in 30% of ESRD patients ….In Mexico, the fragmentation of the health care system has resulted in unequal access to RRT. In the state of Jalisco, the acceptance and prevalence rates in the more economically advantaged insured population were higher (327 per million population [pmp] and 939 pmp, respectively) than for patients without medical insurance (99 pmp and 166 pmp, respectively). The transplant rate also was dramatically different, at 72 pmp for those with health insurance and 7.5 pmp for those without it.

You may need some help understanding this, especially if you go to the source at http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S0100-879X2015000500377&script=sci_arttext, so here it is. ESRD means End Stage Renal Disease, the point at which your body is no longer serviced by your kidneys and you need dialysis or a transplant. RRT is renal replacement therapy or, as we know it, dialysis or transplant.

And lastly from the Clinical Kidney Journal from January 20th of this year at http://ckj.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/11/25/ckj.sfu124.full

In Mexico, the mortality on peritoneal dialysis is 3-fold higher among the uninsured population compared with Mexican patients receiving treatment in the USA, and the survival rate is significantly lower than the insured Mexican population….

Did you notice how often poverty and insurance were mentioned in the article (if you went to the websites)? I don’t know enough to make any conclusions, but it just might be that lack of money is at the root of such poor outcomes.

IMG_1398Meanwhile, between our honeymoon and a little jaunt to Las Vegas to meet cousins from New Hampshire when they come out to visit their mom who lives in Vegas, I am proud to say I am single handedly indexing The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Parts 1 and 2… and enjoying it! Expect an announcement when the indexes are ready.

But, hey, why wait for announcements?  Starting this afternoon, there will be a giveaway for What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.  Poor baby keeps getting ignored while I work on its younger twin siblings.

I’d better get back to those indexes.

Until next week,Book Cover

Keep living your life!

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