Time Flies When You’re Having Fun

IMG_1625Last week, Bear and I were in Las Vegas for a mini-family reunion. It was my mother’s nephew’s… let’s just say it was a combination of blood relatives and those we consider relatives without the blood connection.

What with the complimentary hotel room at the absolutely gorgeous SLS (which we understand was formerly the Sahara) and the gift of tickets to the outrageous show ‘Diva’ (male impersonators of female celebrities), an edifying tour of The Neon Boneyard, a family Las Vegas style buffet at Red Rock Casino, and a leisurely stroll down the overly-stimulating Fremont Street, we had a wonderful time.

I even got in my usual 20 minutes of gambling. I don’t really have tolerance or a liking for it, but it seemed the right thing to do since that was why the hotel gave us the two nights gratis. I won.IMG_1638

But in another way, I lost. My cousin Amy wasn’t there. She was part of this family. Her husband was there. Her uncle was there. Her mother and brothers were, but she wasn’t.  Three years ago she died of cancer.

She died within one week of my dearest, closest buddy on earth who also died of cancer. My buddy died of colorectal cancer. She’d refused any contact with the medical community for the last decade of her life and she paid the ultimate price for it.  A colonoscopy could have saved her life.

Almost five years ago, I had a colonoscopy… and now it’s time to have one again.  While this is not my favorite activity, I am willing to do so since cancer runs in my family and I’ve already had a bleeding polyp. These are not issues I usually share and, yes, it’s a bit awkward for me but if I can convince even one person who’s presently nauseated just thinking about colonoscopy to have one, it’s worth my personal discomfort.

While the term is becoming common, not everyone knows what a colonoscopy is. WebMd at http://www.webmd.com/colorectal-cancer/colonoscopy-16695 explains.

colonoscopy Colonoscopy is a test that allows your doctor to look at the inner lining of yoularge intestine (rectum and colon). He or she uses a thin, flexible tube called a colonoscope to look at the colon. A colonoscopy helps find ulcerscolon polyps, tumors, and areas of inflammation or bleeding. During a colonoscopy, tissue samples can be collected (biopsy) and abnormal growths can be taken out. Colonoscopy can also be used as a screening test to check for cancer or precancerous growths in the colon or rectum (polyps).

The colonoscope is a thin, flexible tube that ranges from 48 in. (122 cm) to 72 in. (183 cm) long. A small video camera is attached to the colonoscope so that your doctor can take pictures or video of the large intestine (colon). The colonoscope can be used to look at the whole colon and the lower part of the small intestine. A test called sigmoidoscopy shows only the rectum and the lower part of the colon.

Before this test, you will need to clean out your colon (colon prep). Colon prep takes 1 to 2 days, depending on which type of prep your doctor recommends. Some preps may be taken the evening before the test. For many people, the prep for a colonoscopy is more trying than the actual test. Plan to stay home during your prep time since you will need to use the bathroom often. The colon prep causes loose, frequent stools and diarrhea so that your colon will be empty for the test. The colon Normalprep may be uncomfortable and you may feel hungry on the clear liquid diet. If you need to drink a special solution as part of your prep, be sure to have clear fruit juices or soft drinks to drink after the prep because the solution tastes salty.

You have CKD; this is not the prep you will be using.

The National Institute of Health at https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/colonoscopy.html suggests you have a colonoscopy for the following reasons.

  • To look for early signs of cancer in the colon and rectum. It may be part of a routine screening, which usually starts at age 50.
  • To look for causes of unexplained changes in bowel habits
  • To evaluate symptoms like abdominal pain, rectal bleeding, and weight loss

Let’s talk about prep a bit more. You cannot take the usually prescribed Fleet enemas or anything with oral sodium phosphate. Get it?  Sodium?  Phosphate?  Both bad news for CKDers.  One possible alternative is a polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution such as Miralax.  As usual, check with your nephrologist.

DucolaxDucolax is also often prescribed as prep for the procedure, but everydayhealth.com at http://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/dulcolax-laxative makes clear it’s not automatically safe for CKD patients. (Bisacodyl is the compound name; Ducolax is the brand name.)  Take note of the first item on the list.

If you have any of these other conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely use bisacodyl:

  • kidney disease;
  • trouble swallowing;
  • a history of bowel obstruction, diverticulitis, ulcerative colitis, or other intestinal disorder; or
  • if you are taking a diuretic (“water pill”).

This is decidedly turning into a two part blog.  More on the curiously challenging concept of colonoscopy next week.

We’re not the only ones who took a vacation. Here’s a picture of the man behind the title of Loyal Reader, Geo De Angelo, on his vacation:

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Meanwhile, back at the ranch (better known as my office), I wonder if you’re one of the winners in the GiveAway for What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney DiseaseWhat is it. You know, the GiveAway in which I paid for ten of each eighth book bought. If you are, please announce yourself either here in the comments section, on the Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/WhatHowearlyCKD – or on Twitter @SlowItDownCKD so we can publicly congratulate you. If you haven’t seen the GiveAway yet, you can at http://www.amazon.com/What-How-Did-Get-Chronic/dp/1457502143/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1445197041&sr=8-1&keywords=What+Is+It+and+How+Did+i+gET+IT%3F+Early+stage+chronic+kidney+disease.

If you missed it, no worries.  I’m presently working on a different sort of GiveAway with a certain Facebook Kidney Disease Support Group.  More on that next week when I have all the details. Oh, and let’s not forget about the twins (presently being indexed) …IMG_1398

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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