It’s National Kidney Month

March is National Kidney Month.  In the last few years, I’ve offered a new Chronic Kidney Disease book for sale during this month, but free on IMG_1398World Kidney Day. This year that’s March 10th.  The third Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, this year’s offering, has been retitled SlowItDownCKD – 2015. If my CKD writing has a ‘brand name,’ that’s it. Same writer, same type of blogs; just a new title for the series.  Check both Amazon.com on March 10th for your free digital copy.

There’s a reason there’s such attention being paid to our kidneys.  Last year’s National Kidney Month ‘Dear Abby column’ explains.

“DEAR ABBY: Hypertension runs in my family, but as a pretty healthy 49-year-old, I didn’t think much about it. I never realized that my pounding headaches were a direct result of high blood pressure. To make matters worse, the same high blood pressure that was causing my head to throb was also destroying my kidneys.

I wish I had known about my high blood pressure sooner and taken it seriously. When I finally learned about my kidney damage, it was too late to save them.nephrons

More than 73 million people are at risk for developing kidney disease, and I sincerely want to help them avoid this fate. My battle with kidney disease has turned me into an advocate for patients and those who are at risk. In honor of National Kidney Month in March and World Kidney Day on March 12, (Me: That was the date last year.) Will you please help me spread the word? — Lance Taylor in Minnesota

DEAR LANCE: I’m pleased to help you in this worthwhile effort. According to the National Kidney Foundation, 1 in 3 American adults is at risk for kidney disease. Major risk factors for kidney disease include diabetes, high blood pressure, a family history of kidney failure and being age 60 or older. Additional risk factors include kidney stones, smoking, obesity and cardiovascular disease.

Kidney disease often goes undetected because it lacks physical symptoms until the very late stages. By then the organs have already failed. But early detection, healthy lifestyle changes and proper treatment can slow the progress of kidney disease. Those at risk should have simple blood and urine tests to check if their kidneys are working properly.

Readers, if you are at risk, during your next physical examination, ask your health care practitioner to check your kidneys. To learn more about prevention, visit kidney.org. You will also find information about free KEEP Healthy kidney screenings in your area.”

NKF-logo_Hori_OBI’ve written about the more than 50 local offices nationwide that help the NKF provide early-detection screenings and provide other vital patient and community services. I went to the website, clicked on ‘Keep Healthy Event in your area,” and up popped the locations of this particular event.

Several years ago, my daughter Nima asked if could guest blog during National Kidney Month from the perspective of someone who loves a person with CKD. These are some of the highlights of that blog.

“I have to admit when my mother first told me she had CKD I freaked out ever so slightly. My knowledge of CKD was minimal, if that, and it took more than a few times of Ma telling me that CKD was in fact manageable and not a death sentence to calm down…..

One thing I had to get used to was reminding myself to mention at doctor visits that a parent has CKD, and to please take blood work to keep an eye on my own GFR levels. Every now and then I’d also get a helpful reminder from Ma right before a doctor visit.

I … have another resource that not everyone else has: I have a mother who is also writing a very detailed book (Working on the 4th one now.) about her experiences with discovering she had CKD. Getting a chance to read the manuscript of her upcoming book was probably where I got the meat and potatoes of my CKD education. (Nima is the professional Reader for all the CKD books I write.)nima kidney

For those out there that have a loved one that was recently diagnosed with CKD ….don’t be afraid to ask questions about what you can do to help and what you should know about how CKD affects your family member or loved one. I was always worried about tiring my mother out until she finally explained to me that as long as she gets a chance to lay down/nap before we go out, she’s usually fine.”

But it’s not just getting tired; the following appeared on Yahoo’s PRWEB on Monday, March 14, 2011. I took the online test mentioned in the article (which is still there and highly recommended) and, sure enough, I need to see an audiologist. Consider taking the online test yourself after you read this little known information about CKD patients.

“People with Chronic Kidney Disease Should Have Their Hearing Checked:

March is National Kidney Month

 People with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) should take the Across America Hearing Check Challenge—a free, quick, and confidential online hearinghearing test at http://www.hearingcheck.org. The non-profit Better Hearing Institute (BHI) is offering the test as part of its effort to raise awareness of the link between Chronic Kidney Disease and hearing loss. March is National Kidney Month. BHI’s online test will help people determine if they need a comprehensive hearing check by a hearing professional.”

Every part of you is affected by your Chronic Kidney Disease. That means that everyone in your life is affected by it, too. Bear knows I’ve got to exercise each day no matter what we have planned. My friends and family know that inviting us for dinner means I may not be able to eat what they’ve cooked, even if it’s ‘healthy.’ Think about that a bit and you’ll realize CKD is serious.What is it

Until next week,

Keep living your life.

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