All Is Not Lost

Last week, I told you the good news about SlowItDownCKD 2015 being available in print and digital on Amazon.com. And last week, I told the bad news about yet another member of my family being stricken with Parkinson’s disease.SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)

I didn’t know much about the medication to ameliorate the symptoms of the disease, so that’s what I’m exploring this week. But… we need to go back a little bit to see what this myriad of symptoms consists of. Let’s start with a simple definition of Parkinson’s disease. We’ll call it PD, but remember that doesn’t mean peritoneal dialysis in this particular blog.

According to Consumer Health Digest at https://www.consumerhealthdigest.com/health-conditions/parkinsons-disease.html,

“Parkinson’s disease is a disorder of the nervous system that progresses with time. It primarily affects the movement of a person. It develops steadily typically beginning with a slight tremor in one hand. Aside from causing tremor that is the most well-known sign of the disease, it also usually causes stiffness or the slowing of movement. During the early stages, the face may show very little, or no expression at all and the arms may not swing when the affected individual walks. Speech can also become softer or slurred.”no expression

I do see most of these symptoms in the newly diagnosed member of my family.  (Anecdote to lighten this heavy blog: one of my brothers has the ‘no expression’ symptom. A young fellow snidely called him stone face. I quietly told him my brother has Parkinson’s and can’t smile. My brother laughed. I laughed. Finally, the young fellow laughed, too.) What else?

The Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/parkinsons-disease/basics/symptoms/CON-20028488 answered my question:

“Tremor. A tremor, or shaking, usually begins in a limb, often your hand or fingers. You may notice a back-and-forth rubbing of your thumb and forefinger, known as a pill-rolling tremor. One characteristic of Parkinson’s disease is a tremor of your hand when it is relaxed (at rest).

Slowed movement (bradykinesia). Over time, Parkinson’s disease may reduce your ability to move and slow your movement, making simple tasks difficult and time-consuming. Your steps may become shorter when you walk, or you may find it difficult to get out of a chair. Also, you may drag your feet as you try to walk, making it difficult to move.

Rigid muscles. Muscle stiffness may occur in any part of your body. The stiff muscles can limit your range of motion and cause you pain.

Impaired posture and balance. Your posture may become stooped, or you may have balance problems as a result of Parkinson’s disease.

Loss of automatic movements. In Parkinson’s disease, you may have a decreased ability to perform unconscious movements, including blinking, smiling or swinging your arms when you walk.

Speech changes. You may have speech problems as a result of Parkinson’s disease. You may speak softly, quickly, slur or hesitate before talking. Your speech may be more of a monotone rather than with the usual inflections.

micrographiaWriting changes. It may become hard to write, and your writing may appear small.”

Oh, I’d seen all of these in him. Maybe he should have taken his neurologist’s suggestion that he begin medication, but it hadn’t been explained very well. Actually, it hadn’t been explained at all. So what was it?

Oh, my, there are so many different medications listed depending upon your unique set of symptoms. The most common is a combination of L-dopa and carbidopa according to WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/parkinsons-disease/guide/drug-treatments.

“Levodopa (also called L-dopa) is the most commonly prescribed and most effective drug for controlling the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease, particularly bradykinesia  and rigidity.

Levodopa is transported to the nerve cells in the brain that produce dopamine. It is then converted into dopamine for the nerve cells to use as a neurotransmitter.

…carbidopa increases its effectiveness and prevents or lessens many of the side effects of levodopa, such as nauseavomiting, and occasional heart rhythm disturbances.”

Hey, wait a minute! Drugs.com at http://www.drugs.com/cdi/carbidopa-and-levodopa-suspension.html is emphatic that you tell your doctor if you have diabetes or kidney disease BEFORE this is prescribed for you. Ummmmm, we have CKD; that’s kidney disease… and many of us have diabetes which caused the CKD. There’s the same warning about kidney disease on the same site for carbidopa.

Last week, I discovered that if you have ESRD, you’ll more likely to develop Parkinson’s. This brings up more and more questions for me. My newly diagnosed with Parkinson’s family member doesn’t have CKD, but I do… and you do. What if we reach end stage? What if we develop Parkinson’s? You know what? That’s what the specialists are for.parkinsons-disease-info

Thank you to MichaelJFox.org for sharing the infogram above.

Looking at the medical treatments of a disease that’s fairly new to me, what I’ve realized is that your drug treatment has to be specifically tailored for you. You may have symptoms my loved one doesn’t; he may have symptoms you don’t. You may well tolerate a drug; he may need secondary drugs to counteract the side effects of the same drug. He may well tolerate a drug you just can’t without several secondary drugs to counteract the side effects.

When one of my brothers told me this is a complicated disease, I don’t think I realized just how complicated. I’m not a doctor as I keep repeating. I know when we need one, a specialist at that, and now is the time.

Does that mean lose hope? Of course not, drugs are only one type of treatment for Parkinson’s. There’s a whole new field of physical therapy especially for movement disorders. Most of these will cover:

Strengtheningpd ex

Flexibility

Balance

Gait Training

Transfer Training

I’ve been watching my loved one struggle to lift himself off the couch, navigate turns while walking, and keep his balance. It could be heart breaking if we didn’t know help is available. The program he’ll be attending is intensive, four weeks of four days a week. The retired teacher over here told him to think of it as school. Honestly, I don’t care how he thinks of it as long as he does it.

What is it

Well, it’s time to try out some of his until therapy starts exercises with him.IMG_1398

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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