Connected

dictionaryFull Definition of connected from the Merriam-Webster Dictionary

 1:  joined or linked together

2:  having the parts or elements logically linked together <presented a thoroughly connected view of the problem>

3:  related by blood or marriage

4:  having social, professional, or commercial relationships <a well-connected lawyer>

5: of a set:  having the property that any two of its points can be joined by a line completely contained in the set; also:  incapable of being separated into two or more closed disjoint subsets

Growing up in New York, I often heard the word used to suggest someone was associated with the Mafia.  You know, like you see in gangster movies. But, that’s not what today’s blog is about. It’s about the connection among all the chronic ailments you have. That would be the second definition.

Before we start, I need to remind you that I’m not a doctor and have never claimed to be one. This is my thinking from my research. This blog was sparked by a conversation on the Facebook page Stage 3 ‘n 4 CKD Kidneybeaners Gathering Place and Robin Rose who got me to thinking about the connection between CKD and inflammation. Maybe it will give you something to think about, too.

PubMed, part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health at http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19083024 tells us:banner-nihlogo

“Inflammation is the response of the vasculature or tissues to various stimuli. An acute and chronic pro-inflammatory state exists in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), contributing substantially to morbidity and mortality. … Inflammation contributes to the progression of CKD by inducing the release of cytokines and the increased production and activity of adhesion molecules, which together contribute to T cell adhesion and migration into the interstitium, subsequently attracting pro-fibrotic factors. Inflammation in CKD also causes mortality from cardiovascular disease by contributing to the development of vascular calcifications and endothelial dysfunction. … “

In that one quotation, you have the definition of inflammation and its causes. I thought I’d try easing into this difficult explanation.

DIGITAL_BOOK_THUMBNAILIn The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1, I accepted the connection, but without thought:

“And to answer your question about what colon cancer has to do with Chronic Kidney Disease, you have to remember you are medically compromised already. Cancer is a disease caused by inflammation, just as Chronic Kidney Disease is.”

That’s two chronic diseases caused by inflammation: CKD and colon cancer. There are more, many more.

By the time I wrote The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, I was aware that sinusitis is another inflammatory disease.

“According to Canada.com at http://bodyandhealth.canada.com/channel_section_details.asp?text_id=5694&channel_id=1020&relation_id=70842:Digital Cover Part 2 redone - Copy

‘The narrowed nasal passageway caused by a deviated septum can cause mucus to become blocked by preventing the drainage of mucus from a sinus into the nasal cavity. Excess mucus inside the sinuses presents an attractive environment for bacteria, leading to a sinus infection. This in turn causes inflammation of the sinuses (sinusitis), and because it can happen regularly, chronic sinusitis can occur.’”

That’s three chronic diseases caused by inflammation: CKD, colon cancer, and sinusitis. But there are more, many more.

Last year, I wrote SlowItDownCKD 2015 and included this information:

“Another standby, WebMD, at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/understanding-bladder-infections-basic-information explains:

‘Bladder infections are known as cystitis or inflammation of the bladder. They are common in women, but very rare in men. More than half of all women get at least one bladder infection at some time in their lives. However, a man’s chance of getting cystitis increases as he ages, due to in part to an increase in prostate size….”

SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)That’s four diseases caused by inflammation: CKD, colon cancer, sinusitis, and cystitis. But there are more, many more.

According to MedicineNet at http://www.medicinenet.com/psoriasis/article.htm :

“Psoriasis is a noncontagious skin condition that produces plaques of thickened, scaling skin. The dry flakes of skin scales are thought to result from the excessively rapid proliferation of skin cells triggered by inflammatory chemicals produced by specialized white blood cells called lymphocytes. Psoriasis commonly affects the skin of the elbows, knees, and scalp.”

That’s five diseases caused by inflammation: CKD, colon cancer, sinusitis, cystitis, and psoriasis. But there are more, many more.

Let’s not forget rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis.com at http://arthritis.com/rheumatoid_arthritis_symptoms tells us:

“Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease where the body’s immune system attacks normal joint tissues, causing inflammation of the joint lining.

rheumThis inflammation of the joint lining (called the synovium) can cause pain, stiffness, swelling, warmth, and redness. The affected joint may also lose its shape, resulting in loss of normal movement. RA is an ongoing disease, with active periods of pain and inflammation, known as flares, alternating with periods of remission, when pain and inflammation disappear.”

That’s six diseases caused by inflammation: CKD, colon cancer, sinusitis, cystitis, psoriasis, and rheumatoid arthritis. But there are more, many more.

I wouldn’t lose hope even though inflammation seems to be the common thread in chronic disease, though. According to an article in last year’s Blood Purification Journal at https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/368940 , simple lifestyle modifications can help with inflammation:

“Chronic inflammation should be regarded as a common comorbid condition in CKD and especially in dialysis patients. A number of interventions have been proven to be safe and effective in well-designed clinical studies. This includes such inexpensive approaches as modification of physical activity and dietary supplementation. “

For example:  Dr. Richard Synder, O.D.,  suggested an alkaline/anti-inflammatory based diet when he guest blogged.

If you know an expert in the field of Chronic Kidney Disease and inflammation, let me know who that is so I can contact them to ask if they’d like to guest blog for us.

I know you each have a great deal more to say about Chronic Kidney Disease and inflammation… and so do I, so before you protest that this isn’t all there is to the topic: you’re right, but one weekly blog can only go so far. Please feel free to comment about other inflammatory diseases and how they’re affecting your CKD. I only mentioned six of them.

Until next week,Book Cover

Keep living your life!

Advertisements

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://gailraegarwood.wordpress.com/2016/06/13/connected/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s