A Cautionary Tale

Last week, I found myself crushed for time: a friend was coming to visit from Florida, we had a Father’s Day brunch at our house, there were Ave Qtheater tickets, one of the kids needed immediate aid since she was in her own time crunch, the list goes on and on. Taking that into account and not wanting to add that old demon ‘stress’ to the list, I thought I’d do a quick, easy blog about acupuncture/acupressure and Chronic Kidney Disease.

But while researching I discovered a number of sites with online doctors and changed my topic immediately. The ones I clicked on were:

I’m sure there are more, but rather than be an alarmist, I want to be an explainer.

Explainer of what you ask. Not acupuncture or acupressure.  There’s a discussion of how acupressure works in the May 4th blog in SlowItDownCKD 2015 Book Cover (76x113)SlowItDownCKD 2015.  Acupuncture works on the same principle, but using very fine needles rather than pressure. I happily and confidently made use of both before my CKD diagnose and only ceased my treatments when the senior acupuncturist working on me told me these treatments would not help with the CKD. That was over nine years ago. He may have changed his opinion since then.

I want to explain why online doctors are not such a great idea. I can practically see some of you rolling your eyes at me while others are thinking, “Why not?” Okay, maybe they’re legal, but are they ethical? I found a fairly straight forward abstract on ResearchGate which states:

“…online medical consultations pose greater dangers to patients compared to traditional off-line consultations…. while new technologies may aid doctors in making better diagnoses at a distance, they often bring new concerns.”

You can read more about this yourself at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228234723_Online_Medical_Consultations_Legal_Ethical_and_Social_Perspectives

arthritisI find myself struggling here. I am all in favor of online doctor summaries by your doctors, test reports from your labs, and general medication explanations from the internet. However, I simply cannot understand how someone who has never met you, someone who has not examined your body, someone who has never spoken with you can advise you on your health.

I’ve mentioned before that I have psoriasis, arthritis, neuropathy, sleep apnea, and probably a host of other as-yet-undiagnosed-inflammatory based diseases (This might be a good time to reread last week’s blog about inflammation caused disease. Connected) How can someone who’s never met me take all of this into account when dealing with my health?

A perfect example of what I’m talking about is from the IMPRESSIONS section of my rheumatologist’s recent report,

“This is a very complex patient that presents today with generalized myalgias and arthralgia….Her health history is complicated by carpal tunnel syndrome, neuropathy and chronic kidney disease, stage 3.”

She has not missed a trick. Myalgia, according to the Medical Dictionary at http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/myalgia is muscular pain. The Mayo Clinic at http://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/joint-pain/basics/definition/sym-20050668 tells us arthralgia is joint pain.  So my muscles and joints hurt. Without seeing me, without testing my joints and muscles, without seeing if the joints are disfigured or the muscles flaccid (for example) how could she help me?

I’m not one to take pain killers, especially NSAIDS which are defined in the glossary of What Is It and How Did I Get It? What is itEarly Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.

“NSAID: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen, aspirin, Aleve or naproxen usually used for arthritis or pain management, can worsen kidney disease, sometimes irreversibly.”

So I have pain and I can tolerate it. I can’t help but wonder what an online doctor would diagnose. I decided to become a test case. I contacted an online doctor from one of the sites listed above. This is the transcript of that online chat, errors and all.

Welcome! This is a real online-doctor, not a robort. If you have any questions on kidney disease, feel free to type your questions, you will surely         get reply. No consultation fee.

If the online doctors are all busy and you can’t get response for a long time, you can contact us by phone or email. (Contact information                       followed.)

renal-onlinedoctor: Hello, I am renal-onlinedoctor, I am very glad to talk with you!

You: I have pain. What do I do about it?

renal-onlinedoctor: hello, your age and gender?

You: 69 female

renal-onlinedoctor:  ok, what is the current kidney function or creatinine level? do you knowonline doc

You: 50%

renal-onlinedoctor:  ok, Any symptoms? foamy urine, swelling, fatigue, back pain, anemia, itching,  etc

You: Just joint and muscle pain.

renal-onlinedoctor: i see. Do you have Diabetes, high blood pressure, or other problem?

You: HBP, neuropathy, arthritis, psoriasis

renal-onlinedoctor:  ok, What are the current medicines or treatment?

You:  Only hbp meds and arthritis meds.

renal-onlinedoctor: okay  i see. I’d like to send you related info and advice. What is your Email address?

At this point, I ended the chat since I thought I might be deluged with emails if I responded.  Have I proven anything? Only that the online portion of dealing with an online doctor is extremely general.

Where are the questions about my weight? As I wrote in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2:

“Keeping your weight down is one of the ways to help retard the progression of the disease.  How? By not allowing yourself to become obese. Obviously, if you keep gaining weight, you can become obese.  Obesity is one of the contributing factors for developing diabetes.  Diabetes may lead to, and complicates, the treatment of, CKD.”IMG_1398

And what about exercise? In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1, I included the following from the American Kidney Fund:

“Exercise can help you stay healthy.  To get the most benefit, exercise for at least 30 minutes, 5 days of the week.”

Yes, it is possible the online doctor may have included such information in the emails(s) he wanted to send me, but how specific to my unique, complex medical situation would they have been… or how specific to yours?

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. I agree totally with what you have said regarding on-line doctors. I often ask myself are they even qualified, or perhaps have been struck off. They make me quite nervous,

    • Thanks for taking the time to comment, Kris. I find myself down right leery of online doctors at this point. Come to think of it, I have since I first stumbled upon one.


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