I’m Wearing Out

I’ll hold off the Cuba blog for another week because something else seems more relevant right now. I was thinking about last week’s blog and what my friend’s surgeon told her about slow bone healing when you have Chronic Kidney Disease. Some vague memory was nagging me.  And then I got it. Yay for those times we conquer mind fog.

fluRemember I’d had the flu that morphed into a secondary infection recently? My breathing was so wheezy and I was feeling so poorly that I went back to immediate care a second time just ten days after the first time I’d been there.

What is immediate care you ask? That’s a good question. Let’s allow HonorHealth at https://www.honorhealth.com/medical-services/immediate-care-urgent-care to answer.

“If you need medical care quickly for a non-life-threating illness or injury.… Patients of all ages can walk into any one of the four HonorHealth Medical Group immediate care centers, with no appointment needed, for such ailments and injuries as lacerations, back pain, cough, headache, or sinus or urinary tract infections.

…advantages:

  • Your co-pay is lower with immediate care compared to urgent care.
  • All four Valley locations are within offices of HonorHealth primary care physicians. That means any follow-up care you might need will be easy to access.
  • Your medical records, including labs and radiology images, soon will be linked systemwide with other HonorHealth facilities. So if you find yourself in an HonorHealth hospital or at an HonorHealth specialist, your medical information will be easily accessible by trusted caregivers. In addition, you won’t need to provide the same information over and over again; it will be in your medical record.”

It’s also clean, well equipped, and the wait is never too long. That’s where I go when I can’t get an appointment with my primary care doctor. There may be a different immediate care facility in your area.

Back to the bone issue. While I was there, an x-ray of my chest was ordered to check for pneumonia. I’m lucky: there wasn’t any. But, there was the unfolding of the thoraxthoracic aorta which I blogged about, and there was “levoconvex curvature and degenerative spurring of the thoracic spine.”

I am way past the point of panicking when I encounter a medical term I don’t know in a report about my body, but I am still curious… very curious. As I wrote in the blog about the unfolding aorta:

IMG_2982“…. In The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 there’s an explanation of thorax. … ‘the part of the human body between the neck and the diaphragm, partially encased by the ribs and containing the heart and lungs; the chest’ according to The Free Dictionary at http://www.thefreedictionary.com/thorax. Thoracic is the adjective form of thorax.” Adjectives describe the noun – the person, place, thing, or idea.

And degenerative? There’s a poignant discovery about that in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease: “Ah, CKD is a degenerative disease.”  Well, all right then. Both CKD and the spurring of my thoracic spine are degenerative. What exactly does degenerative mean, though? My all-time favorite Merriam-Webster Dictionary tells us it’s the adjective (yep, that means describing) form of degeneration. Their definition of degeneration at https://www.merriam- webster.com/dictionary/degeneration is “deterioration of a tissue or an organ in which its function is diminished or its FullSizeRender (2)structure is impaired.” This doesn’t sound too great; it sounds like CKD.

What about “levoconvex curvature”? I understand curvature and I’m sure you do, too, so let’s just deal with levoconvex. I see convex in the word and know that means curving outward. Levo is new to me. GLOBALRPh at http://www.globalrph.com/medterm6b.htm, which defines itself as The Clinician’s Ultimate Reference, tells us this simply means left. Now how did I miss that when I studied Greek and Latin all those years ago?  Looks like my spine curves outward to the left. I couldn’t find any relationship between this and CKD except that it may cause kidney pain if the curvature is severe enough.

FullSizeRender (3)Sure enough, there is a connection between CKD and the spurring of my thoracic spine and it’s degeneration. But wait. I forget to explain spurring. This is how it was explained in The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2:

“…bone spur.  A what?  Oh, an osteophyte!  Osteo comes from the Latin osseusosossis meaning bone and the Greek osteon, also meaning bone. {Thank you for the memory, Hunter College of the City University of New York course in Greek and Latin roots taken a zillion years ago.}”

Funny how the memory works sometimes and others it doesn’t. I can just see one of my kids rolling her eyes and saying, “So?”

So, it means that there is extra bone growing on my poor thoracic spine as part of the degeneration of my body. Even though it’s my body I’m writing about, I find it amusing that bone is growing rather than diminishing as part of the degeneration. It seems backwards to me.

However, there you have it: chronic kidney disease is a degenerative disease.  The spurring of the thoracic spine is also degenerative. Since I just turned 70, I’m not surprised about the spine thing. Keep in mind that CKD can hit at any age.

You knew it. This is turning into a plea to get tested for CKD. Here’s a bit of information from the National Kidney Foundation of Arizona at NKF-logo_Hori_OBhttps://azkidney.org/path-wellness that can help with that:

“Path to Wellness screenings provide free blood and urine testing, which is evaluated onsite is using point-of-care testing devices to assess for the risk of diabetes, heart and kidney diseases. Those screened are also presented with chronic disease management education, an overall health assessment (weight, blood pressure, etc.) and a one-on-one consultation with a physician. Enrollment opportunities are offered for a follow-up 6-week series of Healthy Living workshops that teach chronic disease self-management skills. For more information, click the link above or call our main line at: (602) 840-1644.”

IMG_2980

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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