Memories of Another Sort

When I was teaching Creative Non-Fiction at Phoenix College, I got into the habit of taking my classes to The Poisoned Pen, an award winning independent book store here in Arizona. I wanted them to hear well known authors talk about their writing process and see that these people were human beings just as they, my students, were. I retired from teaching several years ago, but I still go to writers’ workshops at the Pen. Last time I was there, I stumbled upon an advance copy of a book by Lisa Stone.

What’s an advance copy? It means either Advance Reading Copy of Advance Review Copy – depending upon who you talk to and is abbreviated ARC. TCK Publishing at https://www.tckpublishing.com/advance-review-copies/ informs us:

“Big traditional publishers often print thousands of ARC copies to send out to trade reviewers, bloggers, booksellers, librarians, and other people who can generate word of mouth for the book. In today’s technological environment, digital ARCs are gaining rapidly in popularity, sent out in email blasts and through various online services. ARCs are also used in giveaways and contests to give ordinary readers early access to books in an effort to build buzz.”

Lisa Stone, the author of the ARC of The Darkness Within (the one I picked up), is the nom de plume of Kathy Glass. She’s a bestselling British author who wrote about cellular memory – alternately called cellular memory phenomenon – after organ transplant. I was transfixed. We all know I rarely write about transplantation, but today I am. Here’s a reminder from SlowItDownCKD 2015 as to just what that is:

“WebMD at http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/kidney-transplant-20666 tells us:

‘A kidney transplant is surgery to replace your own diseased kidneys with a healthy (donor) kidney.’

I should mention that while there are transplants from both living and cadaver donors, both will require lifelong drugs to prevent rejection. “

Now for the biggie: what is cellular memory? According to Medical Daily at http://www.medicaldaily.com/can-organ-transplant-change-recipients-personality-cell-memory-theory-affirms-yes-247498:

“The behaviors and emotions acquired by the recipient from the original donor are due to the combinatorial memories stored in the neurons of the organ donated. Heart transplants are said to be the most susceptible to cell memory where organ transplant recipients experienced a change of heart.”

Lisa Stone’s protagonist had a heart transplant and his personality became that of his donor. Far fetched? Maybe.

But what about the case of Demi-Lee Brennan, the Australian young lady who had a liver transplant that changed her blood type and immune system back in 2008? The Sydney Morning Herald at http://www.smh.com.au/news/national/transplant-girls-blood-change-a-miracle/2008/01/24/1201157559928.html included this quote from one of her doctors.

“We didn’t believe this at first. We thought it was too strange to be true,” Dr Alexander said. ‘Normally the body’s own immune system rejects any cells that are transplanted … but for some reason the cells that came from the donor’s liver seemed to survive better than Demi-Lee’s own cells. It has huge implications for the future of organ transplants.’”

And those who have received kidney transplants? Is there anything to report about cellular memory there? I turned to the Daily Mail, a British newspaper, at http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-533830/My-personality-changed-kidney-transplant–I-started-read-Jane-Austen-Dostoevsky-instead-celebrity-trash.html#ixzz4t3Ml4sAt and found this:

“’A spokesman for UK Transplant said: ‘While we are aware of the suggestion that transplant recipients take on aspects of the personality of the organ donor, we are not aware of any evidence to support it.

While not discarding it entirely, we have no reason to believe that it happens. We would be interested to see any definitive evidence that supports it.’

Examples cited as proof of cellular memory include a U.S. woman terrified of heights who became a climber and a seven-year-old girl who had nightmares about being killed after being given the heart of a murdered child.”

The Liberty Voice, a publication that is new to me and seems to be part of The Guardian, at http://guardianlv.com/2013/06/organ-transplants-cellular-memory-proves-major-organs-have-self-contained-brains/ had the sort of background information I was looking for:

“In our modern culture, cellular memory was first studied in heart transplant recipients when the patients displayed strange cravings, change in tastes, cravings and mild personality. Major organs like the heart, liver, kidney, and even muscles are known to contain large populations of neural networks, which are self-contained brains and produce noticeable changes. Acquired combinatorial memories in organ transplants could enable transferred organs to respond to patterns familiar to the organ donors, and it may be triggered by emotional signals. Science discovered evidence that nervous system organs store memories and respond to places, events, and people recognized by their donors.

Gary Schwartz has documented the cases of 74 patients, 23 of whom were heart transplant recipients. Transfers of memories have not been reported in simpler transplants like corneas because they don’t contain large population of neurons. Dr. Andrew Armour a pioneer in neurocardiology suggests that the brain has two-way communication links with the “little brain in the heart.” The intelligence of neural brains in organs depends on memories stored in nerve cells.”
You can find the Schwartz study at http://www.newdualism.org/nde-papers/Pearsall/Pearsall-Journal%20of%20Near-Death%20Studies_2002-20-191-206.pdf.

Since I didn’t know the publication, I checked on some of the contributors…especially since the documentation was on such a small population. Well, will you look at that; Gary Schwartz is a local teaching at The University of Arizona. This is his faculty entry at http://neurology.arizona.edu/gary-e-schwartz-phd  

“Dr. Schwartz is Professor of Psychology, Medicine, Neurology, Psychiatry and Surgery. He is the Director of the Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health (LACH, formerly the Human Energy Systems Laboratory). After receiving his doctorate from Harvard University, he served as a professor of psychology and psychiatry at Yale University, director of the Yale Psychophysiology Center, and co-director of the Yale Behavioral Medicine Clinic. Dr. Schwartz has published more than four hundred scientific papers, edited eleven academic books, is the author of several books including The Afterlife Experiments, The Truth About Medium, The G.O.D. Experiments, and The Energy Healing Experiments.”

As for Dr. Armour, his full name seems to be Dr. John Andrew Amour. I found a host of books he’s edited or written and conferences where he’s spoken.

I’m convinced cellular memory exists. I leave it up to you if you can – or even want to – accept this theory.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. As I have received a kidney from a college friend, I find this fascinating. My husband has attributed a few personality changes to Pam’s kidney. I dismissed the idea but you have me thinking with this column. I have found myself surprised by my own feelings sometimes. I expect to feel one way but I actually feel another. Interesting….

  2. Sorry for the delay, Suzanne. Family business took precedence this week. I find your response fascinating. Would you be comfortable sharing specifics with us?

    • I don’t have any concrete examples I’m afraid. I initially thought the idea was ridiculous because a kidney is not a heart. That would make sense to me. I am pretty driven about details, putting things back where you find them, sweating the small stuff. I’ve always been that way and mostly I still am. I make a bigger deal of things than necessary. And yet, sometimes I’m not like that and it surprises even me. I can offer several explanations besides my transplant, like just getting older, years of daily meditation, living through a serious illness. I like the idea of being more like my dear life-saving friend though.

      • This is impressive anecdotal information. Thanks for sharing it, Suzanne. I knew there was a reason I was so happy to see you following the blog, fb page, and twitter.


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