There’s Always the Exception

And this is one of them. We all know I don’t write about dialysis, but I’ve been receiving bunches of emails lately asking if I would consider including this product, that book, or the other social media kidney disease awareness item. My response is usually thank you, but I don’t allow advertising or product promotion on the blog. When Dr. Bruce Greenfield, a Los Angeles nephrologist with 37 years experience, sent me a link to his dialysis rap with the following message, I was forced to think twice: “My goal is to reach every dialysis patient in America, in part to make people more informed, in part to shed a little light into their world in a fun way, and of course- to make them smile!”

But why? Are smiles and laughter necessary in the treatment of illness? According to Dr. Jordan Knox, a resident in family medicine, they are. This is how he summarized the need for physicians to use humor in his essay on KevinMD.com at http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2017/10/theres-place-humor-medicine.html last Friday: “Patch Adams, MD is one of the best-known physicians to use humor in healing. He focuses more on silliness to reach pure joy, nourishing the soul as much as the body. There is something about the contrast, when silliness uproots the expectation of seriousness, that is more powerful than pure humor alone. I think that’s why humor can be so powerful in the doctor’s office; because the expectation is all business, seriousness, and authority. Humor can break down those rigid roles of “patient” and “doctor,” or “team leader” and “team member.” It can level the playing field and align people on the same side, working toward a shared goal.”

Being a Groucho Marx fan, I keep thinking of his one liner, “A clown is like an aspirin, only he works twice as fast.” Hey, CKD patients can’t take aspirin (if they’re NSAIDS or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), so why not take humor instead?

But what happens to us physically when we laugh? I checked in with my old standby, The Mayo Clinic, at https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/stress-relief/art-20044456?pg=1 and found the following information about laughter and your body.

Short-term benefits

Laughter can:

Stimulate many organs. Laughter enhances your intake of oxygen-rich air, stimulates your heart, lungs and muscles, and increases the endorphins that are released by your brain.

Activate and relieve your stress response. A rollicking laugh fires up and then cools down your stress response, and it can increase your heart rate and blood pressure. The result? A good, relaxed feeling.

Soothe tension. Laughter can also stimulate circulation and aid muscle relaxation, both of which can help reduce some of the physical symptoms of stress.

Keep in mind that I am not a dialysis patient but hope that this rap is helpful to those who are. Sit back, turn up the speakers, and have some short term benefits courtesy of Dr. Greenfield.

I laughed… and I learned, but I was really interested in the effects of laughter that could help Chronic Kidney Disease patients in the early and moderate stages. WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/balance/features/give-your-body-boost-with-laughter#2 had a bit more information about that. Mind you, these results are observational or the results of very small studies.

Blood flow. Researchers at the University of Maryland studied the effects on blood vessels when people were shown either comedies or dramas. After the screening, the blood vessels of the group who watched the comedy behaved normally — expanding and contracting easily. But the blood vessels in people who watched the drama tended to tense up, restricting blood flow.

Immune response. Increased stress is associated with decreased immune system response, says Provine. (He’s a professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County and author of Laughter: A Scientific Investigation.) Some studies have shown that the ability to use humor may raise the level of infection-fighting antibodies in the body and boost the levels of immune cells, as well.

Blood sugar levels. One study of 19 people with diabetes looked at the effects of laughter on blood sugar levels. After eating, the group attended a tedious lecture. On the next day, the group ate the same meal and then watched a comedy. After the comedy, the group had lower blood sugar levels than they did after the lecture.

Reminder: Diabetes is the number one cause of CKD. CKD means a compromised immune system. Healthy blood flow is necessary for healthy kidneys.

Tomorrow is Halloween (Happy birthday to my brother Paul!), so I wanted to try my hand at some macabre humor.

 

Obituary –

The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 died peacefully on October 20th, 2017, on Amazon.com and B & N.com at the age of three. The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 is survived by SlowItDownCKD 2011 & SlowItDownCKD 2012, which were both born of a need for larger print, more comprehensive indexes, and a less wieldy book to hold. The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 was preceded by What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney DiseaseThe Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 1 gave birth to The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2, SlowItDownCKD 2015 and SlowItDownCKD 2016. Flowers and condolences in the form of Chronic Kidney Disease Awareness may be sent to any and all vehicles for spreading awareness of this disease.

Researching laughter and CKD led to only laughter and dialysis sites. I wasn’t satisfied with that and kept looking only to find this generalized, but easily understood, image from The Huffington Post Partners at .

I don’t think we can forget that anything that’s good for your heart will benefit the kidneys. Since CKD is an inflammatory disease, reducing inflammation of any kind in the body can only be a good thing. Look at that! Both bad cholesterol and systolic blood will be lowered. These are all kidney related. Hypertension is the second most common cause of CKD. Cholesterol makes the heart work harder, which can raise your blood pressure. Uh-oh.

Another thing I realized is that if I find something wrong, you know like the termite invasion or the a/c breaking in 100 degree weather, my first response is laughter. I never knew why. Hmmm, maybe I’ve been protecting my body all along.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. I agree. There’s nothing better than laughing. When I’m with my sister it seems like that’s all we do.

    • You and your sister are lucky women, Sherry. Confession time: whenever I need a laugh, I picture my brother laughing and, before you know it, so am I.

  2. Nice post.


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