Movin’ On Up

Considering my family’s history, I’m vigilant about having colonoscopies. This year, however, there was an additional test – an endoscopy. You may have heard of this as an upper endoscopy, EGD or esophagogastroduodenoscopy. The names are interchangeable. Whatever you call it, I was intrigued.

What is an endoscopy, you ask. According to the Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/endoscopy/basics/why-its-done/PRC-20020363:

An upper endoscopy is used to diagnose and, sometimes, treat conditions that affect the upper part of your digestive system, including the esophagus, stomach and beginning of the small intestine (duodenum).

Okay, but that doesn’t explain what the procedure is. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases at https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diagnostic-tests/upper-gi-endoscopy can help us out here:

Upper GI endoscopy is a procedure in which a doctor uses an endoscope—a flexible tube with a camera—to see the lining of your upper GI tract. A gastroenterologist, surgeon, or other trained health care professional performs the procedure, most often while you receive light sedation to help you relax.

Relax? I was out like a light. First I was being shown was the device that was going to hold my mouth open and hold the tube that would be going down my throat, the next second I awoke in my room… or so it seemed.

Now the biggie: why have an endoscopy in the first place? I went to Patient Platform Limited at https://patient.info/health/gastroscopy-endoscopy and found this,

A gastroscopy may be advised if you have symptoms such as:

• Repeated (recurring) indigestion.
• Recurring heartburn.
• Pains in the upper tummy (abdomen).
• Repeatedly being sick (vomiting).
• Difficulty swallowing.
• Other symptoms thought to be coming from the upper gut.

The sort of conditions which can be confirmed (or ruled out) include:

• Inflammation of the gullet (oesophagus), called oesophagitis. The operator will see areas of redness on the lining of the oesophagus.
• Stomach and duodenal ulcers. An ulcer looks like a small, red crater on the inside lining of the stomach or on the first part of the gut (small intestine) known as the duodenum.
• Inflammation of the duodenum (duodenitis) and inflammation of the stomach (gastritis).
• Stomach and oesophageal cancer.
• Various other rare conditions.

Wait a minute. I can already hear you asking what that has to do with Chronic Kidney Disease. Claire J. Grant, from the Lilibeth Caberto Kidney Clinical Research Unit in London, Canada, and her colleagues’ answer was reported in PhysciansEndoscopy at http://www.endocenters.com/chronic-kidney-disease-adversely-affects-digestive-function/#.WiLwjrpFxaQ,

“CKD adversely affects digestive function,” the authors write. “Abnormalities in digestive secretion and absorption may potentially have a broad impact in the prevention and treatment of both CKD and its complications.”

Not good. We know that CKD requires close monitoring and life style changes. This may be another facet of the disease to which we need to pay attention.

I had some biopsies while I was under sedation. Nope, didn’t feel a thing.

But I now know I have gastritis and an irregular Z-line. The silver lining here is that I don’t have Helicobacter pylori or H. pylori, a type of bacteria that infects the stomach which can be caused by chronic gastritis. Mine seems to be the food caused kind. Generally it’s alcohol or caffeine, spicy foods, chocolate, or high fat foods that can cause this problem. I don’t drink, eat spicy or high fat foods, and rarely eat chocolate, but nooooooooooooooooo, please don’t take away those two luscious cups of coffee a day.

I wasn’t sure what this Z-line thing was so started poking around on the internet, since I didn’t catch it before seeing the gastroenterologist for my after visit appointment. Dr. Sidney Vinson, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences/UAMS College of Medicine explained:

This refers to the appearance of the tissue where the esophagus and stomach meet. The z-line is a zig-zag line where these 2 different type tissues meet. Occasionally it can be irregular and protrude more into the esophagus and not have the typical appearance. This is generally a benign condition but can occasionally represent mild barrett’s esophagus, a precancerous change caused by reflux.

My source was HealthTap at https://www.healthtap.com/user_questions/198269-in-regards-to-upper-gi-endoscopy-what-is-an-irregular-z-line

Apparently my normal duodenum was biopsied to see if my doctor could find a reason for the pain I was experiencing in the upper stomach. Well, it was more discomfort than pain, but he wanted to be certain there wasn’t an ulcer… and there were no ulcers. Yay!

Hmmm, I have gastritis which is an inflammation and CKD, which is an inflammatory disease. Which came first? Did it matter? If I treat one will the other improve? I’ve been following the renal diet for all nine years since my diagnose and have made the appropriate life style changes, too.

What more could I do? There’s the ever present to struggle to lose weight. That could help. I wasn’t willing to take more medication as my gastroenterologist understood and accepted. I was already taking probiotics. I examined the little booklet produced by Patient Point that I was given more closely ignoring all the advertisements for medication.

Look at that. It seems sleeping on your left side can help. “Since your stomach curves to your left, part of it will be lower than your esophagus.” I can do that, although I wonder if it will be awkward while wearing the BiPap.

I also learned that skipping late night snacks and eating smaller meals would be helpful since there would be less acid produced by smaller meals and I wouldn’t have to deal with acid while I slept if I stopped eating at least two hours before bedtime. Acid is produced to help digest your food.

For Thanksgiving, I was part of a video produced by Antidote Me (the clinical trial matching program I wrote about several weeks ago). The topic was What I Am Thankful to Medical Research for. I think I can safely add endoscopy to that list. https://drive.google.com/file/d/1Mwv-vBRgzRFe8-Mg6Rs7uUIXMOgOMJHX/view

I was also invited to participate in two separate book signings and have a video from one of them. I’ll post it as soon as I can figure out how since I don’t own the rights yet. Oh, I feel a new year’s resolution coming on – learn more about the technology I need for my writing.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

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4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Thanks for this writing, my husband just had an endoscope and colonscopy. Prior he had H Pylori and polyps removed. The HPylori was cleared with antibiotics and polyps removed, biopsies were negative but he too has gastritus. Treatment is propantazole. His years on Plavix and low dose Asprin are to blame but this med is suppose to help. At any rate I enjoy reading your articles, my Dad was on dialysis so it’s all close to my heart. Thank you.

    • Thanks, Pam. It may sound odd, but I write about the kidneys from my heart. Every time I receive a comment like yours, I know I’m doing what I was meant to be doing.

      It sounds like your husband went through quite the ordeal. I’m glad to hear he’s better now.

      • Gail thank you and I am wishing you the best of health.

  2. You are very welcome and the same good thought to you and your husband. Happy holidays!


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