Smoke Gets In Your Hair

Last weekend I was in Las Vegas renewing my vows to Bear as my brother and sister-in-law renewed their vows to each other. It was their 50th year of marriage, our 5th. I listened to what they had to say to each other during the ceremony and realized that was what I would have said to Bear on our 50th, if we were young enough to be able to count on having a 50th. And then I began to wonder how many people do reach this milestone in their lives.

More than the ceremony, it was the smoke in the casinos, the restaurants, the shops, and the cabs that got me to thinking about this. Even our non-smoking rooms had the scent of cigarettes. I know how much harm smoking can do to my kidneys, but what was this second hand smoke doing to them? If it clung to our hair and clothes, what else was it doing to us?

The very minute I was told I have CKD, I stopped the social smoking I had been doing. I would be surprised if I smoked a whole pack of cigarettes each month back then. But I wasn’t taking any chances on not raising my GFR. It was 39% at diagnose, so the smoking had to stop. Yet, it wasn’t until this past weekend that I became concerned about second hand smoke.

It appears that I’m not the only one concerned about second hand smoke. The National Kidney Fund (NKD) at https://www.kidney.org/blog/staying-healthy/second-hand-smoke-may-be-harmful-kidneys offers the following:

“Secondhand smoking was defined as living with at least 1 person who smoked, or having an elevated level of cotinine (a breakdown product of nicotine) in their blood. The researchers found that active smoking was associated with slightly lower kidney function and higher amounts of protein in the urine. Interestingly, secondhand smoke exposure was also associated with slightly lower kidney function in this study even after taking [into] account differences in age, sex, weight, demographics and parental education level. Differences in kidney function observed in the study were relatively small, but these small differences could have important effects on risk of developing hypertension and chronic kidney disease.”

What makes it worse is that hypertension, or high blood pressure, is one of the two leading causes of CKD. So second hand smoke could lead to CKD itself and/or one of the leading causes of CKD. Either way, it sounds like a losing proposition to me.

Of course, I needed to know more about cotinine. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) at https://www.cdc.gov/biomonitoring/Cotinine_FactSheet.html was able to help me out here:

“Cotinine is a product formed after the chemical nicotine enters the body. Nicotine is a chemical found in tobacco products, including cigarettes and chewing tobacco. Measuring cotinine in people’s blood is the most reliable way to determine exposure to nicotine for both smokers and nonsmokers exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS). Measuring cotinine is preferred to measuring nicotine because cotinine remains in the body longer.

How People Are Exposed to Cotinine

Nicotine enters people’s bodies when they smoke or chew tobacco. When exposed to ETS from nearby smokers, smaller amounts of nicotine enter the body of the nonsmoker. Workers who harvest tobacco and produce tobacco products can also be exposed through their skin.”

While I don’t usually write about younger people and Chronic Kidney Disease, this quote from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health at https://www.jhsph.edu/news/news-releases/2013/navas-acien-smoking-may-impact-kidney-function-among-adolescents.html caught my eye:

“’Tobacco use and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke are major health problems for adolescents, resulting in short-term and long-term adverse health effects,’ said Ana Navas-Acien, MD, PhD, senior author of the study and an associate professor with the Bloomberg School’s Department of Environmental Health Sciences. ‘In this nationally representative sample of U.S. adolescents, exposure to tobacco, including secondhand smoke and active smoking, was associated with lower estimated glomerular filtration rates—a common measure of how well the kidneys are working. In addition, we found a modest but positive association between serum cotinine concentrations, a biomarker of tobacco exposure, among first-morning albumin to creatinine ratio. These findings further support the conclusion that tobacco smoke may damage the kidneys.’”

Lower estimated glomerular filtration rates???? No, thank you. I rarely go to casinos or any other place that allows smoking for that matter. I just don’t like the odor. Now I have a much more important reason to avoid such places.

Switching topics here. Something else I rarely mention is CKD cookbooks, probably because I don’t cook that often and firmly believe CKD patients need to eat according to their lab results. Months ago I received one such book in the mail and carefully explained to the author’s representatives that I don’t review CKD cookbooks on the blog. It’s an attractive book and always caught my eye just lying there on the kitchen counter for the last several months. During one of those in-the-house-trying-to-recoup-my-energy days after we got back from Las Vegas, I did the logical thing and picked it up to read.

Susan Zogheib, a registered dietitian with a Master’s in Health Science fulfilled my CKD cookbook dreams in her The Renal Diet Cook for the Newly Diagnosed in that she suggested repeatedly that we, as CKD patients, must work on our diets with our doctors and/or renal dietitians, especially if we have high blood pressure or diabetes. I also like that she clearly made the point that you have to take into account the stage of your CKD, your labs, your concurrent medical problems, and more. This, while including fairly easy recipes for some good looking meals. I never thought I’d like a cookbook. Well, there was the Betty Crocker one pre-CKD when I was a young bride still in college.

My 71st birthday is Friday. Naturally that means it’s time for a book giveaway. My birthday equals your gift. Three is my favorite number, so the first three book giveaway virgins (haven’t won a book before) to offer another bit of information about second hand smoke or CKD cookbooks win one of my CKD books. Sounds fair to me.

Until next week,
Keep living your life!

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7 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. I figured second-hand smoke was really bad for us, but I never actually put two and two together with respect to it being so harmful to our CKD. I grew up with parents who smoked like stacks, and now my sister has followed in their footsteps, no matter how hard we are on her about it. My husband hates the smell and doesn’t like for us to go to their house anymore because of it – and if we do, I have to wash all the clothes we wore immediately. Too much work, so I don’t get to see my sister as often as I’d like. But being that I’m Stage 4, I’m trying to protect my GFR as long as possible! Thank goodness the casino here in Massachusetts is smoke-free! lol

    • Donna, thank you for the info on your family’s smoking and your CKD. You have just won yourself a copy of The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2. Please email me your physical address and I’ll send it right out.

  2. Congratulations on renewing your vows with your love and also to your brother and sister in law on renewing their vows. I want to wish you a wonder Birthday as well. On the subject of smoke I dearly despise trying to go in or come out of a building and being caught in the nasty smoke, it not only enters your lungs but attaches to your hair and clothes. I feel those smoking need a closed in pavilion to do so. I am not one to rip rights away from anyone but it’s my opinion they have the right to smoke but I have the right not to so move it along. As I get older I think more about good and bad habits.

    • Thank you, Pamela, for all the good wishes.

      I couldn’t agree with you more about smoke. I think the closed pavilion, much like the smoking rooms in New York restaurants, is a wonderful idea.

      Talking about wonderful, you are winner #3 in the birthday book giveaway. Please send me your physical address so I can send out your copy of SlowItDownCKD 2016. Congratulations!

      • Oh thank you Gail I never win anything.
        Pamela Thacker
        48 Dixon Lane
        Elkton Maryland 21921

  3. You never won anything BEFORE; your luck is changing now, Pamela.

    • Thank you


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