Just a Little Bit Pregnant

We are in Dayton, Ohio, right now and have attended the surprise baby shower for one of my daughters. Wow, just wow! Every other phrase from the guests’ lips was baby this or baby that… and rightly so. It was a baby shower, for goodness’ sake. I loved the oohing and aahing, the happy tears, the stories about when the mom and dad to be were babies themselves. I loved seeing how excited the parents to be were and how thrilled we all were for them.

Yep, I got to thinking. Is it the same for those pregnant moms with CKD? When I first started writing about Chronic Kidney Disease back in 2010, this was included in What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease:

“Pregnancy is risky for women with CKD. The risks for both the mother and fetus are high as is the risk of complications.  You’ll need to carefully discuss this with your nephrologist and your gynecologist should you absolutely, positively want to bear a child rather than adopt.”

How dismal. And how outdated. Eight years can make one heck of a lot of difference in the medical field.

The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/atoz/content/pregnancy has information which is far more recent so I’m going to turn this week’s blog over to them for a while:

“A new baby is a joy for any family. But pregnancy can put a lot of stress on your body. If you have kidney disease or kidney failure, it can put you and the health of your unborn child at risk.

Are you thinking about pregnancy? If so, you should discuss it beforehand with your doctor or other healthcare provider. They know you, and they can help you make a decision that is based on your own personal health. There are many things to consider. You and your doctor should discuss them all very carefully. Some things that can affect a healthy pregnancy include:

  • Your stage of kidney disease
  • Your general health
  • Your age
  • Having high blood pressure, diabetes, or heart disease
  • Having other serious health conditions
  • Protein in your urine

Here are a few brief answers to some common questions about kidney disease and pregnancy.

Can a woman with “mild” kidney disease have a baby?

That depends. There is good evidence to suggest that women with very mild kidney disease (stages 1-2), normal blood pressure, and little or no protein in the urine (called “proteinuria”) can have a healthy pregnancy. What is proteinuria? It’s a sign of kidney damage. Your body needs protein. But it should be in your blood, not your urine. Having protein in your urine usually means that your kidneys cannot filter your blood well and the protein is leaking out.

In women with moderate to severe kidney disease (stages 3-5), the risk of complications is much greater. For some women, the risk to mother and child is high enough that they should consider avoiding pregnancy.

If you are thinking of becoming pregnant, ask your doctor or other healthcare provider about your stage of kidney disease, your risk for complications, your degree of proteinuria, and any other health conditions you may have.

Can a woman who is on dialysis have a baby?

Some changes in your body make it hard to become pregnant. For example, most women on dialysis have anemia (a low red blood cell count) and hormone changes. This may keep them from having regular menstrual periods.

Women with kidney failure are usually advised against becoming pregnant. The rate of complications is very high. Risks to both the mother and developing baby are high. If you are thinking of becoming pregnant, talk to your healthcare provider. If you become pregnant, you will need close medical supervision, changes in medicine, and more dialysis to have a healthy baby.

Can a woman who has a kidney transplant have a baby?

Yes. If you have a kidney transplant, you are likely to have regular menstrual periods and good general health. Therefore, getting pregnant and having a child is possible. But you should not become pregnant for at least one year after your transplant, even with stable kidney function. Some medicines that you take after a kidney transplant can cause problems to a developing baby. In some cases, pregnancy may not be recommended because there is a high risk to you or the baby. Another reason is if there is a risk of losing the transplant.

Talk with your healthcare provider if you have a transplant and are thinking about getting pregnant. Your healthcare provider may need to change your medications so that it is safe for you to become pregnant. It is very important to use birth control until you and your healthcare provider have agreed that it is safe for you to become pregnant.”

There is even more information at the URL for this article. What I found encouraging is that for each stage of kidney disease – chronic, dialysis, transplant – there is hope. I see the cautions, I know it means extra care and extra work, but it is possible. Nowhere did I read that pregnancy is not for those with CKD.

By the way, I didn’t develop CKD until my youngest was in her twenties and my doctor still had to take my general health, age, and if I had high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, or other serious health conditions into account.

The baby whose shower we attended is our first grandchild. When I was diagnosed with CKD a decade ago, I doubted I would live to see this day… and that had nothing to do with the fact that I had just met the man who was to be my husband and hadn’t yet met his daughter who will be this baby’s mother.

My point here is that I’ve learned so much about keeping my CKD under control and it’s pretty much been through asking questions and working with my nephrologist, as well as researching. And now I’m urging you to learn as much as you can if you’d like to have a baby. Well, in general too, but today’s blog is about pregnancy.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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3 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Congrats on becoming a grandma! There is nothing like it. My only sadness is the little place where I keep my worry that my genetic CKD be inherited by my daughters. If so, my wonderful grandkids will be at risk too.

  2. So Nice.


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