The Nation and the World are Working Together

It’s National Kidney Month and the country is burgeoning with kidney education in one way or another. I’ll be doing my part, too. Tomorrow, I’ll be speaking on eCareDairy. There are two links  to listen in:

https://www.ecarediary.com/EFCRadioShow.aspx and http://www.blogtalkradio.com/ecarediary/2018/03/06/coping-with-chronic-kidney-disease. This is my favorite kind of show – unscripted. If there’s anything you’d like me to include in my talk, leave a comment sometime today.

Of course, some of you are now asking yourselves how National Kidney Month started. Aha! I’ve got that covered. The National Kidney Foundation thought this would be a good way to bring awareness of kidney disease, and how to treat – and even prevent – its complications. Considering the many walks, golf tournaments, dances, free screenings, and other kidney disease education events that are scheduled throughout the year, I’d have to agree with them.

I’ll also be guest blogging on MyTherapyApp at https://www.mytherapyapp.com/blog on World Kidney Day which is Thursday, March 8. (World Kidney Day is always the second Thursday in March.) This is an app to help you remember to take your medications, test your blood glucose, blood pressure, or whatever else you have to test, even to take a walk.

And World Kidney Day? What’s that? This is from The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2 (Maybe this year will be the one I finally get to split this book into SlowItDownCKD 2013 and SlowItDownCKD 2014). I’ve updated it to reflect the most current information. The updates are bolded:

“I discovered this is a fairly new designation. It was only twelve years ago that it was initiated.

According to http://worldkidneyday.org, “World Kidney Day is a global awareness campaign aimed at raising awareness of the importance of our kidneys.”

Sound familiar?  That’s where I’m heading with What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease; SlowItDownCKD 2011; SlowItDownCKD 2012; The Book of Blogs: Moderate Stage Chronic Kidney Disease, Part 2; SlowItDownCKD 2015; SlowItDownCKD 2016; the daily CKD tidbits on Facebook; and this blog. We may be running along different tracks, but we’re headed in the same direction.

The 58 year old International Society of Nephrology (ISN) – a non-profit group spreading over 155 countries – is one part of the equation for their success.  Another is the International Federation of Kidney Foundations with membership in over 40 countries. Add a steering committee and The World Kidney Day Team and you have the makings of this particular concept….

This year’s theme is Chronic Kidney Disease and Women’s Health.

While there are numerous objectives for this year’s World Kidney Day, the one that lays closest to my heart is this one: ‘Encourage systematic screening of all patients with diabetes and hypertension for CKD.’

Their site offers materials and ideas for events as well as a map of global events. Prepare to be awed at how wide spread World Kidney Day events are.

Before you leave their page, take a detour to Kidney FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) on the toolbar at the top of the page.  You can learn everything you need to know from what the kidneys do to what the symptoms (or lack thereof) of CKD are, from how to treat CKD to a toolbox full of helpful education about your kidneys to preventative measures.

If only my nurse practitioner had been aware of National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day, she could have warned me immediately that I needed to make lifestyle changes so the decline of my kidney function could have been slowed down earlier. How much more of my kidney function would I still have if I’d known earlier?.. That was a decade ago and this shouldn’t still be happening… but it is.

I received a phone call a few years ago that just about broke my heart.  Someone very dear to me sobbed, “He’s dying.” When I calmed her down, she explained a parent was sent to a nephrologist who told him he has end stage renal disease and needed dialysis or transplantation immediately.

I pried a little trying to get her to admit he’d been diagnosed before end stage, but she simply didn’t know what I was talking about. There had been no diagnose of Chronic Kidney Disease up to this point. There was diabetes, apparently out of control diabetes, but no one impressed upon this man that diabetes is the foremost cause of CKD.

What a waste of the precious time he could have had to do more than stop smoking, which he did (to his credit), the moment he was told it would help with the diabetes.  Would he be where he was then if his medical practitioners had been aware of National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day, especially since this man was high risk due to his age and diabetes?  I fervently believe so.

I have a close friend who was involved in the local senior center where she lives.  She said she didn’t know anyone else but me who had this disease.  Since 1 out of every 7 people does nationally and being over 60 places you in a high risk group, I wonder how many of her friends were included in the 96% of those in the early stage of CKD who don’t know they have CKD or don’t even know they need to be tested.  I’d have rather been mistaken here, but I’m afraid I wasn’t. National Kidney Month or World Kidney Day could have helped them become aware.

For those of you who have forgotten (Easily read explanations of what results of the different items on your tests mean are in What Is It And How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease.), all it takes is a blood test and a urine test to detect CKD.  I have routine blood tests every three months to monitor a medication I’m taking.  It was in this test, a test I took anyway, that my family physician uncovered Chronic Kidney Disease as a problem.

There is so much free education about CKD online. Maybe you can start with the blogroll on the right side of the blog.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Great post! I’m so worried about my kidneys. I’ve tested 3 times to be in stage 3, but my GP doesn’t do anything. Since I have a new rheumatology appt soon, I plan to press them to do something. I also have Sjogrens, EDS, and more. Thanks for spreading awareness.

    • I’m so sorry to hear of your medical conditions.

      Some nephrologists don’t recommend any treatment until end stage, but I say, “Why wait?” The longer you do, the more damage may be done.

      My rheumatologist feels stage 3 is “not really CKD.” We have agreed to disagree.

      I’m not sure it is my place to suggest this, but have you considered changing nephrologists?

      By the way, thanks for the kudo.


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