Rising to the Challenge

Remember Loyal Reader from a few years ago? He and I are still in touch and toss around ideas here and there. He sent me an article about Chronic Kidney Disease patients being at higher risk for Hepatitis C along with the comment, “Hmmm, I wonder why?” I know a challenge when I see one, so let’s find out.

Back to basics: what is Hepatitis C anyway? As I mentioned in SlowItDownCKD 2013, Hepatitis is from the … Greek word root, hepa, which means liver.” Interesting, but not enough information for our purposes.

According to our old friend the MayoClinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/hepatitis-c/symptoms-causes/syc-20354278,

“Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated blood.”

The National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/sites/default/files/HepC_Infographic.pdf explained why hepatitis C is associated with Chronic Kidney Disease:

“Hepatitis C infection is strongly associated with kidney disease. Hepatitis C is more common in people with kidney disease than the general population. Hepatitis C can be a cause of kidney disease, or make existing kidney disease worse. People receiving a kidney transplant, or donating a kidney, are routinely tested for hepatitis C.

Hemodialysis and Hepatitis C People receiving long-term hemodialysis have a risk of getting hepatitis C through transmission in the dialysis clinic. The risk is small because of strict standard health precautions used in dialysis units today. However, some cases of hepatitis C being spread between patients have been reported.”

By the way, NKF uses infographs which are easy to understand.

In SlowItDownCKD 2017, I explained what KDIGO is. We’re going to need that explanation in just a moment.

“This stands for KIDNEY DISEASE | IMPROVING GLOBAL OUTCOMES. Their homepage at KDIGO.org states, “KDIGO MISSION – Improving the care and outcomes of kidney disease patients worldwide through the development and implementation of global clinical practice guidelines.”

Here’s where KDIGO comes in. Way back in 2008, the following was published in the April issue of the official journal of the International Society of Nephrology, Kidney International, which supports the KDIGO:

“‘HCV infection is associated with an increased prevalence of reduced kidney function, albuminuria, and an increased risk of developing end stage renal disease,’ says Dr. Jaber, who is also vice chair for clinical affairs, Department of Medicine at Caritas St. Elizabeth’s Medical Center, ‘HCV infection is also associated with increased mortality among patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis and among kidney transplant recipients.'”

But, in 2018, KDIGO updated their recommendations: “We recommend screening all patients for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection at the time of initial evaluation of chronic kidney disease (CKD).”

Hmmm, as Loyal Reader would say, I wonder if this has something to do with the albuminuria Dr. Jaber mentioned in 2008.

Let’s see what we can find out. I found this in SlowItDownCKD 2015:

“Albumin is a protein.  It will show up as microalbumin in your urine test.  It may also show up as proteinuria since albumin is a protein.”

We can figure out that microalbumin is extremely small particles of albumin, but what about proteinuria? I went back, back, back to my first CKD book, What Is It and How Did I Get It? Early Stage Chronic Kidney Disease for the definition:

“Protein in the urine, not a normal state of being.”

Does anyone else feel like we’re going down the rabbit hole here? Of course it’s not normal! It means we have CKD. Now, if there’s any amount   of protein in our urine… and there may be since we do have Chronic Kidney Disease… it looks like Hepatitis C Virus can raise that amount and lower our GFR. Not good, not good at all.

So what do we do about it? WebMD at https://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/digestive-diseases-hepatitis-c#2 held the least medicalese answer about the drugs that all the sites I viewed saw as the best treatment plan:

“Your treatment will depend on many things including what type of hepatitis C virus you have. In the U.S., the most common type is genotype 1, followed by genotypes 2 and 3. Genotypes 4, 5, and 6 are very rare in the U.S. Your doctor will help you figure out what’s right for you, based on your medical needs and insurance coverage. “

I know. I had the same question. What is a genotype? Hello, Dictionary.com, my old friend, at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/genotype.

“the genetic makeup of an organism or group of organisms with reference to a single trait, set of traits, or an entire complex of traits.”

Well, that makes sense. Just one more thing, though. Is it possible to know we have Hepatitis C before we’re diagnosed with CKD – at which time we should be tested for HCV – or even if we don’t have CKD? That is a loaded question. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), fully 80% of those with acute or short term HCV won’t have any symbols. The other 20% may experience mild symptoms you might experience with any illness: fever, joint pain, being tired and/or nauseous, and the like. However with chronic or long term HCV, you might experience dark urine and/or jaundice of the skin and eyeballs. To complicate matters even more, there are three different kinds of hepatitis. You can read much more about hepatitis at https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hcv/cfaq.htm

There’s one thing that I haven’t yet made clear. Your body rids itself of wastes and excess fluids through either the kidneys or the liver. If you have CKD, your kidneys are already not functioning as well as they should which means you’re not getting rid of either wastes or excess fluids efficiently. Guess what. One of the functions of the liver is to also clean your blood. Having two organs that are not effectively cleansing your blood is not a position you want to be in… ever.

This was a difficult blog to write. There were so many little pieces to link together. But thanks for the challenge, Loyal Reader, I learned a lot.

Switching topics now. Since the weather has been,uh, difficult lately (to say the least), I thought this might be helpful.  Use this link rather than clicking below: https://ecs.page.link/SVpB 

Until next week,

 

Keep living your life!

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