What’s That Got to Do with My Occupation?

I’ve written about neuropathy, but what is this occupational therapy that may treat it? I know about physical therapy and have made use of it when necessary. Remember a few years ago when knee surgery was indicated? Physical therapy helped me avoid the surgery.

This time I was offered gabapentin for the neuropathy. That’s a drug usually used for epilepsy which can also help with neuropathy. I would explain how it works, but no one seems to know. I had two problems with this drug:

  1. Gabapentin became a controlled substance in England as of April of this year. England always seem to be one step ahead of the U.S. re medications.
  2. It is not suggested if you have kidney disease.

My other option was occupational therapy. That’s the one I chose. Let’s backtrack a bit for a definition of occupational therapy. Thank you to my old buddy (since college over 50 years ago) the Merriam-Webster Dictionary at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/occupational%20therapy for the following definition.

“therapy based on engagement in meaningful activities of daily life (such as self-care skills, education, work, or social interaction) especially to enable or encourage participation in such activities despite impairments or limitations in physical or mental functioning”

That got me to wondering just how occupational therapy differed from physical therapy, the kind of therapy with which I was already familiar. I went to my old buddy again, but this time at https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/physical%20therapy for any hints I could pick up from the definition for physical therapy.

“therapy for the preservation, enhancement, or restoration of movement and physical function impaired or threatened by disease, injury, or disability that utilizes therapeutic exercise, physical modalities (such as massage and electrotherapy), assistive devices, and patient education and training”

Made sense to me. Physical therapy was for the movement of the body, while occupational therapy was to help you carry out the tasks of your daily life. For example, it takes me longer to write a blog because my tingling, yet numb, fingers often slip into the spaces between the keys on the keyboard. Another example is that I now use a cane since I can’t tell if my tingling, yet numb, feet are flat on the floor as I walk.

Something I found interesting about occupational therapy is that it uses many forms of therapy that were once considered alternative medicine… like electrical energy. What’s that you say? You’d like an example?

Well, here you go. My therapist uses a machine called a Havimat. The following is from the National Stem Cell Institute at https://nsistemcell.com/hivamat-how-it-relieves-edema/  and explains what the Havimat can do and how.

“….The therapist connects an electronic lead to his/her wrist while the patient grasps a small cylinder grip. The vinyl gloves that the therapist wears prevents the circuit of electric current from closing, thus creating the ‘push-pull’ effect that penetrates deeply into tissues. Meanwhile, the patient’s experience is one of a pleasant, deep massage maintained by the therapist’s gentle pressure as he/she directs the deep oscillation.

…. The therapy “un-dams” trapped fluid. Tissues are decongested and edema is significantly reduced. This shrinks swelling in the area being treated. Hivamat has been shown to be exceptionally effective in relieving lymphedema when used by therapists to enhance manual lymphatic drainage.

…. Besides the reduction of edema, therapists use Hivamat for ridding tissues of toxins [Gail here: like chemotherapy.]  When used by a certified therapist during a manipulation technique known as manual lymphatic drainage, the therapy improves lymph fluid movement. This encourages better flow through the lymphatic system, which then carries away metabolic waste and toxins more quickly. Hivamat also promotes the production of lymphocytes, which improve the function of the immune system. [Gail here again: as CKD patients, our immune systems are compromised.]”

There is one thing, though. Apparently, the Havimat is NOT suggested if there is an active tumor. Uh-oh, I had three treatments with the Havimat before I uncovered that fact. I’ll have to speak with my therapist today and find out why she didn’t know that. But it is clear that using electrical energy as treatment is another case of what was formerly considered alternative medicine becoming mainstream medicine.

Topic switch. I’ve written about the American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP), precision care, and clinical trials many times before. You’re probably already aware of the new initiative for patient care. AAKP wants your help in doing their part as far as patient experience with this survey.

“As part of AAKP’s National Strategy, we have expanded our

capacities to involve a far larger, and more representative, number

of patients in research opportunities and clinical trials. The

results of these research opportunities and clinical trials will help

create a clearer understanding of the patient experience and help

shape the future of kidney disease treatment and care. AAKP is

fully committed to changing the status quo of kidney care

and to better aligning treatment to personal aspirations.

To achieve this goal, the AAKP Center for Patient Research &

Education is working with top researchers to ensure that the

patient voice, patient preferences and patient perceptions are

heard.

AAKP is very pleased to partner with Northwestern University

and University of Pennsylvania on an important research

project organ donation.

Please consider taking part in this online survey and help

shape the future of kidney care for you and those yet to

be diagnosed.

Volunteers Needed for Research Study!

Researchers at Northwestern University and University of Penn-

sylvania invite kidney transplant candidates to participate

in a survey about your opinions of research done on donor

organs. Such research aims to help organs work better and

make more organs available for transplantation.

Your responses will help to improve the informed consent

process for transplant candidates.

You are eligible to participate if you:

•  Are 18+ years old

•  Speak English

•  Are currently a transplant candidate on the waitlist for only

    one organ

This anonymous survey is voluntary, and will take about 45

minutes of your time.

Your decision about participating will not affect your place on

the waiting list. Your participation may help improve the informed

consent process for transplant candidates.

Find out more information and take the survey by clicking

the link below [Gail here yet again: Don’t forget to click

control at the same time.]:

https://redcap.nubic.northwestern.edu/redcap/surveys/index.php?s=TEMXLDLF8A

Thank you to those taking part in the survey for helping

AAKP help those awaiting a transplant.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Hi Gail, So glad to see that you keep on truckin’, as we used to say. My nephrologist at the transplant clinic prescribed gabapentin when I had headaches my first 3 years post transplant. Since they frequently started in the middle of the night the idea was if I had better sleep, I wouldn’t get the headaches. I took gabapentin once. I felt so out of it the next day I wouldn’t take it again. My headaches have gradually disappeared over the last couple of years for which I’m grateful. I’ve since learned gabapentin can be habit forming.
    Thanks for another great blog. Always glad to see it arrive. Best!

    • Thanks, Suzanne. My fiction and creative non-fiction may be on hold, but never the blog. I’m glad you figured out the gabapentin on your own. As you can tell, I’m leery of it.


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