Saving CKD Lives

Last week, I wrote about Covid-19 and a little about precautions explaining why we – as Chronic Kidney Disease patients – need to take extra care. A reader in Ireland was shocked that this was all we had in the way of protecting ourselves (as much as possible) from contacting the virus here in the United States. The precautions weren’t that much different than the precautions for everyone else.

There are a few things going on here. First is that we have no leadership from Mr. Trump who seems to have decided this is not his responsibility. That leaves us with the governors of each of the fifty United States and, in some cases, the mayors of individual cities in each of these states to lead us. They may have very different ideas.

There is this post I found on Facebook that exemplifies our situation in the U.S. Unfortunately, it is not attributed to anyone. I would love to give credit where credit is due.

“WE ARE NOT IN THE SAME BOAT …

I heard that we are all in the same boat, but it’s not like that. We are in the same storm, but not in the same boat. Your ship could be shipwrecked and mine might not be. Or vice versa.

For some, quarantine is optimal. A moment of reflection, of re-connection, easy in flip flops, with a cocktail or coffee. For others, this is a desperate financial & family crisis.

For some that live alone they’re facing endless loneliness. While for others it is peace, rest & time with their mother, father, sons & daughters.

With the $600 weekly increase in unemployment some are bringing in more money to their households than they were working. Others are working more hours for less money due to pay cuts or loss in sales.

Some families of 4 just received $3400 from the stimulus while other families of 4 saw $0.

Some were concerned about getting a certain candy for Easter while others were concerned if there would be enough bread, milk and eggs for the weekend.

Some want to go back to work because they don’t qualify for unemployment and are running out of money. Others want to kill those who break the quarantine.

Some are home spending 2-3 hours/day helping their child with online schooling while others are spending 2-3 hours/day to educate their children on top of a 10-12 hour workday.

Some have experienced the near death of the virus, some have already lost someone from it and some are not sure if their loved ones are going to make it. Others don’t believe this is a big deal.

Some have faith in God and expect miracles during this 2020. Others say the worst is yet to come.

So, friends, we are not in the same boat. We are going through a time when our perceptions and needs are completely different.

Each of us will emerge, in our own way, from this storm. It is very important to see beyond what is seen at first glance. Not just looking, actually seeing.

We are all on different ships during this storm experiencing a very different journey.”

Let’s take a look at the Chronic Kidney Disease boat to see what I can find out for us. I immediately went to the National Kidney Foundation at https://www.kidney.org/coronavirus/kidney-disease-covid-19. If you’ve read last week’s blog, then you already know we are more vulnerable to Covid-19 and why.

Are there special precautions that someone with kidney disease should take?

Older adults and people with kidney disease or other severe chronic medical conditions seem to be at higher risk for more serious COVID-19 illness. If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should:

  • Stock up on supplies
  • Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact
  • Wash your hands often
  • Avoid crowds as much as possible
  • During an outbreak in your area, stay home as much as possible.

Please remember that if you are on dialysis, you should not miss your treatments. Contact your clinic if you feel sick or have any questions or concerns.

If you have a kidney transplant, it is important to remember to keep taking your anti-rejection medicines, maintain good hygiene and follow the recommendations from your healthcare team. Contact your healthcare team with any questions or concerns….

Should CKD patients wear masks in public?

It is best to stay home, unless you need to attend a dialysis treatment. If you must go out in public, ask your healthcare provider if it is necessary as a CKD patient to wear a face mask since each individual case is different.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends face masks for those who are infected with COVID-19, have symptoms of COVID-19, or taking care of someone with COVID-19.

The CDC also recommends wearing cloth face coverings to slow the spread of COVID-19 in areas where community-based transmission is significant. These homemade cloth face coverings are not masks and do not replace the President’s Coronavirus Guidelines. (Gail here: As you can see, Trump doesn’t have much more to offer than what we already know. To be fair, this site hasn’t been updated since March 16th, over a month ago. Wait a minute! Why isn’t this site updated daily?)

Tips for using a mask include a snug but comfortable fit covering the bridge of the nose and the entire mouth. Also, be sure to be laundered [sic] the cloth mask after use each outdoor use, ideally without damage to the shape or structure of the mask. … The CDC also recommends coffee filters as an alternative. Use of any mask is in addition to practicing social distancing or at least 6 feet from others to limit coronavirus spread. All patients at high risk, such as immunosuppressed transplant recipients or people receiving dialysis should follow the directions of their clinicians regarding the type of face covering that should be used outside of a clinic setting.

When in public it is important to practice social distancing by staying 6 feet away from other people and to also avoid touching your face. Wash your hands immediately after you have been in public.”

This is still paltry information at best. Emedicine at https://www.emedicinehealth.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=228849 gives us just a bit more insight about patients on dialysis according to the CDC:

“The CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention) guidance recommends that for medically stable patients facilities give the option of waiting in a personal vehicle or outside the facility and to be contacted by mobile phone when they are ready to be seen.

  • Dialysis facilities should have space allocated to allow patients who are ill to sit separately from other patients by at least 6 feet.
  • Patients experiencing respiratory symptoms should promptly be taken to appropriate treatment areas to reduce time in waiting areas.
  • For those with symptoms, ideally, dialysis treatment should be provided in a separate room from other patients, with the door closed.
  • If a separate room is not available, the masked patient should be treated at a corner or end-of-row station not near the main traffic flow. A separation of at least 6 feet should be maintained between masked, symptomatic patients and other patients during treatment.
  • Use of hepatitis B isolation rooms should only be considered for patients with respiratory symptoms if the patient has hepatitis B or if no patients treated at the facility have hepatitis B.

Healthcare personnel caring for patients with undiagnosed respiratory infections should further observe standard contact and droplet precautions with eye protection unless a suspected diagnosis such as tuberculosis requires airborne precautions, according to the guidance.

Precautions should include using gloves, facemasks, eye protection, and isolation gowns.”

And transplantees? I am so frustrated by the lack of more concrete information that might be more helpful than that given to non-kidney patients. UNOS (United Network for Organ Sharing) at https://optn.transplant.hrsa.gov/governance/policy-notices/ offers the following information:

COVID-19 Policy Actions Implemented

The table below contains information for actions taken to address OPTN operational issues in the COVID-19 crisis.

Policy Summary Documents & supporting resources Effective date
Policy 1.4.F: Updates to Candidate Data during 2020 COVID-19 Emergency This emergency policy will allow transplant programs to refresh candidate clinical data with data obtained through previous testing in order to maintain current waitlist priority.

This policy prevents candidates who cannot undergo routine testing due to the COVID-19 crisis from being adversely affected on the waitlist.

OPTN Policy Notice March 17, 2020
Policy 3.7.D: Applications for Modifications of Kidney Waiting Time during 2020 COVID-19 Emergency This emergency policy allows transplant programs to submit a waiting time modification application to retroactively initiate waiting time for affected candidates.

This policy prevents potential non-dialysis candidates who meet creatinine clearance or glomerular filtration rate (GFR) criteria from being disadvantaged because they cannot obtain other testing required.

OPTN Policy Notice April 3, 2020
Policy 18.1: Data Submission Requirements
Policy 18.2: Timely Collection of Data
Policy 18.5.A: Reporting Requirements after Living Kidney Donation
Policy 18.5.B: Reporting Requirements after Living Liver Donation
This emergency policy change relaxes requirements for follow-up form submission.

The intent of the policy is to prevent unnecessary exposure risk to transplant recipients and living donors, and also to alleviate data burden for centers in the midst of COVID-19 crisis.

 

Longer blog or not today – and it is much longer – I wish you all would adhere to these conditions. Are they restricting? Possibly. Are they uncomfortable? Could be. Are they lifesaving? It seems they are. Be safe.

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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3 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. Hi Gail

    I am on Rituxan and scheduled for an infusion in a very high risk city in two weeks. I am worried about going. Have you heard anything about aritusin and the virus.

    Thank you ..

    Beth

    >

  2. Dear Gail, Thank you for caring blog, research, & honesty. May God bless you in your own struggles for health and wholeness.

    Best Blessings, Susan

    • Thank you, Susan. It’s hard to criticize your own government, but it has missed the all important mark to save lives this time.
      I am getting better and hope to be finished with chemotherapy by the summer. It would be nice to taste food again.


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