I Never Knew

I’ve already mentioned that I read a lot while undergoing chemotherapy for my pancreatic cancer. I don’t have the energy for much else, although I do find my energy slowly increasing day by day. Often, I come across words or terms that are new to me as I read. One such term is ‘hypertensive nephrosclerosis.’ That’s a mouthful, so let’s start slowly.

‘Hypertensive’ is not a problem since we know that hyper means,

hyper– a prefix appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant “over,” usually implying excess or exaggeration (hyperbole); on this model used, especially as opposed to hypo-, in the formation of compound words (hyperthyroid).”

Thank you, Dictionary.com at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/hyper-. A little reminder: a prefix is a group of letters added at the beginning of a word which changes its meaning. Aren’t you glad I was an English teacher for over forty years?

You’ve probably already figured out that ‘tensive’ has to do with some kind of tension. According to Dictionary.com again, but this time at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/tensive?s=ts, it means,

adjective

stretching or straining”

That is a sort of tension, so you’re right. Add the prefix to the root word and suffix and you get ‘hypertension.’ Maybe a little grammar lesson would help here. A suffix is a group of letters added at the end of a word that change its meaning by expressing tendency, disposition, function, connection, etc. (By the way, some of this was taken from – yep – Dictionary.com again. This time at https://www.dictionary.com/browse/-ive?s=t.) What else? Oh, yes, ‘root.’ That’s the main part of the word; in this word, it’s tens. I know, I know, you didn’t come here for a grammar lesson.

Good thing ‘nephrosclerosis’ is a compound word. We know all about ‘nephro’ since it means kidney. And ‘sclerosis?’ That means hardening. This is a good point to mention this can be fatal. A former colleague recently died of sclerosis.

So ‘nephrolsclerosis’ is a hardening of the kidneys. Let’s check that out just to be sure. According to MedicineNet at https://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=4533:

 Nephrosclerosis: A progressive disease of the kidneys that results from sclerosis (hardening) of the small blood vessels in the kidneys. Nephrosclerosis is most commonly associated with hypertension or diabetes and can lead to kidney failure.

With me so far? Just one more step, let’s add ‘hypertensive’ to ‘nephrosclerosis.’ Emedicine at https://emedicine.medscape.com/article/244342-overview tells us,

“The term hypertensive nephrosclerosis has traditionally been used to describe a clinical syndrome characterized by long-term essential hypertension, hypertensive retinopathy, left ventricular hypertrophy, minimal proteinuria, and progressive renal insufficiency. Most cases are diagnosed based solely on clinical findings….”

Okay, let’s break down the definition of what we just added together to understand this term. You already know what ‘hypertension’ and ‘proteinuria’ are from reading my blogs. If you forgot, use the click throughs in the above definition. That leaves ‘hypertensive retinopathy’ and ‘left ventricular hypertrophy’ since we also know what ‘progressive renal insufficiency’ is.

‘Hypertensive retinopathy’ is summarized by DoveMed, a new site for me whose stated mission is

“We provide reliable unbiased medical information to healthcare consumers and providers by leveraging our unique ecosystem of world class products and services.”

at https://www.dovemed.com/article-synonyms/stage-4-hypertensive-retinopathy/ in this manner:

  • “Hypertensive Retinopathy (HR) refers to abnormal changes of the retina that is located in the back of the eye, due to chronic hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • The retinal arteries are autoregulated, meaning they can control their own shape based on changes in systemic blood pressure. However, at extremely high blood pressures, such as a blood pressure of 140/110 mmHg or over, they are unable to autoregulate. This can result in retinal complications
  • Depending on the severity of the signs and symptoms, Hypertensive Retinopathy can be classified to 4 stages – stage 1, 2, 3, and 4. Stage 1 Hypertensive Retinopathy has mild signs and symptoms, whereas Stage 4 Hypertensive Retinopathy has severe signs and symptoms
  • These changes typically occur in individuals who have had very high blood pressure for several years. The signs and symptoms of Hypertensive Retinopathy may include leakage of fats from the blood vessels, retinal edema (fluid in the retina), and swelling of the optic nerves
  • Some of the complications can include lack of oxygen delivered to the retina, as well as swelling of the macula and optic nerve that can result in the vision being affected
  • The treatment typically consists of controlling systemic hypertension with medications. Prognosis is generally good for individuals with stage 1 or 2 Hypertensive Retinopathy”

That leaves ‘left ventricular hypertrophy.’ Have no fear! The Mayo Clinic at https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/left-ventricular-hypertrophy/symptoms-causes/syc-20374314 is here to help us out:

“Left ventricular hypertrophy is enlargement and thickening (hypertrophy) of the walls of your heart’s main pumping chamber (left ventricle).

Left ventricular hypertrophy can develop in response to some factor — such as high blood pressure or a heart condition — that causes the left ventricle to work harder. As the workload increases, the muscle tissue in the chamber wall thickens, and sometimes the size of the chamber itself also increases. The enlarged heart muscle loses elasticity and eventually may fail to pump with as much force as needed.

Left ventricular hypertrophy is more common in people who have uncontrolled high blood pressure. But no matter what your blood pressure is, developing left ventricular hypertrophy puts you at higher risk of a heart attack and stroke.

Treating high blood pressure can help ease your symptoms and may reverse left ventricular hypertrophy.”

Adding all this information together, it’s clear that hypertensive blood pressure is going to do you no good in any way. So what do we do to avoid high blood pressure? That’s right! And the CDC backs you up. Take a look at https://www.cdc.gov/bloodpressure/prevent.htm.

“Prevent High Blood Pressure

….Eat a Healthy Diet

Choose healthy meal and snack options to help you avoid high blood pressure and its complications. Be sure to eat plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.

Talk with your health care team about eating a variety of foods rich in potassium, fiber, and protein and lower in salt (sodium) and saturated fat. For many people, making these healthy changes can help keep blood pressure low and protect against heart disease and stroke.

The DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) eating plan is a healthy diet plan with a proven record of helping people lower their blood pressure….

Visit the CDC’s Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity website to learn more about healthy eating and nutrition.

Keep Yourself at a Healthy Weight

Having overweight or obesity increases your risk for high blood pressure. To determine whether your weight is in a healthy range, doctors often calculate your body mass index (BMI). If you know your weight and height, you can calculate your BMI at CDC’s Assessing Your Weight website. Doctors sometimes also use waist and hip measurements to assess body fat.

Talk with your health care team about ways to reach a healthy weight, including choosing healthy foods and getting regular physical activity.

Be Physically Active

Physical activity can help keep you at a healthy weight and lower your blood pressure. The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommends that adults get at least 2 hours and 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise, such as brisk walking or bicycling, every week. That’s about 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. Children and adolescents should get 1 hour of physical activity every day.

Visit the website for CDC’s Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity to learn about ways you can be physically active.

Do Not Smoke

Smoking raises your blood pressure and puts you at higher risk for heart attack and stroke. If you do not smoke, do not start. If you do smoke, quitting will lower your risk for heart disease. Your doctor can suggest ways to help you quit.

For more information about tobacco use and quitting, see CDC’s Smoking and Tobacco Use Web site.

Limit How Much Alcohol You Drink

Do not drink too much alcohol, which can raise your blood pressure. Men should have no more than 2 alcoholic drinks per day, and women should have no more than 1 alcoholic drink per day. Visit the CDC’s Alcohol and Public Health website for more information.

Get Enough Sleep

Getting enough sleep is important to your overall health, and enough sleep is part of keeping your heart and blood vessels healthy. Not getting enough sleep on a regular basis is linked to an increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, and stroke…. Visit CDC’s Sleep and Sleep Disorders website for resources on how to get better sleep.”

Until next week,

Keep living your life!

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